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The Flyer

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  • The Flyer

    Hanging on the wall in my shop at work is a print of John White's water color of a southeastern Algonquian 'conjurer' he called

    The Flyer

    It inspired this poem -

    Fully charged and all but bare
    Aside from the stuffed bird in his hair
    Skillfully preserved it’s wings spread
    Slowly dancing around the fire, he sings
    His arms stretched like soaring wings
    A journey to the realm of the dead

    Another memory from so long ago
    I can clearly remember the fire’s glow
    Magical night in a wild remote place
    From there to here, into another time
    Scratched upon paper, put into rhyme
    Fading from the page, leaving no trace

    From here to there, ever going somewhere
    No bonds to break, no relations to tear
    Not beholden to god, kings or queens
    Soaring over lofty tree tops and ever higher
    Arms spread like wings, dances the flier
    Over blue mountains and cloud shrouded scenes

    Thoughts swirling like whirlwinds in my head
    While the flier softly conversed with the dead
    In a strange tongue from a forgotten time
    With a hawk’s cry, he leaped over the flames
    Looking into the outer darkness, invoking names
    Of wild elder spirits, names never put to rhyme

    Spirits of the dead and those still living
    Helpful to each other in times of misgiving
    Even more so through dark days of pain
    And feverish nights of maddening unrest
    While in the company of ghostly guests
    From there to here, never to remain

    Last edited by Atehequa; 04-10-2013, 06:37 AM.

  • #2
    Very Nice writing!!
    Asema Is Sacred
    Traditional Use, Not Misuse
    Wakan Tanka please have compassion on me.
    OK Niji we are running a train with red over yellow at this powwow.

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    • #3
      I really like the poem, and the picture!

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      • #4
        It's only through John White's watercolor paintings that we see something of how these southeastern Algonquians looked. Although English, White did not depict these people in a romanticized manner as did many European artists of those early days of contact.

        White and other English visitors gave account of these 'conjurers and sorcerers' defying and going beyond the laws of nature.

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        • #5
          Painted from life in the late 16th century -

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Atehequa View Post
            It's only through John White's watercolor paintings that we see something of how these southeastern Algonquians looked. Although English, White did not depict these people in a romanticized manner as did many European artists of those early days of contact.

            White and other English visitors gave account of these 'conjurers and sorcerers' defying and going beyond the laws of nature.
            Do you know of any good history books on these nations? I am reading Parkman, don't remember how I got started reading him, I pick it up and put it down. Its a weird read, I treat it like fiction, some of those priests and nuns were nuts. There isn't much about the southeastern nations.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by muskrat_skull View Post
              Do you know of any good history books on these nations? I am reading Parkman, don't remember how I got started reading him, I pick it up and put it down. Its a weird read, I treat it like fiction, some of those priests and nuns were nuts. There isn't much about the southeastern nations.
              There is a lot of information regarding southeastern tribes on the net.

              Comment

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