Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ottawa promises to clean up water, offers to move aboriginal community

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ottawa promises to clean up water, offers to move aboriginal community

    ************************************************** ************
    This Message Is Reprinted Under The Fair Use
    Doctrine Of International Copyright Law:
    _http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
    (http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html)
    ************************************************** ************
    FROM: CBC NEWS ONLINE
    _http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/national/2005/10/27/kashechewan-scott051027.ht
    ml_
    (http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/natio...ott051027.html)

    Ottawa promises to clean up water, offers to move aboriginal community
    Last Updated Thu, 27 Oct 2005 23:54:53 EDT
    _CBC News_ (http://www.cbc.ca/news/credit.html)

    Ottawa has offered to relocate the entire aboriginal community of Kashechewan
    in northern Ontario to higher ground.
    * INDEPTH: _Boil-water advisories_
    (http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/wa...radvisory.html)
    Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

  • #2
    Andy Scott
    The offer was made during a meeting between native leaders and Indian Affairs
    Minister Andy Scott on Thursday night.

    There has been no formal reaction yet from the leaders of the Cree reserve
    ion the shores of James Bay that has been at the centre of a political storm
    for the past week because of a contaminated water crisis.
    * INDEPTH: _Aboriginal Canadians_
    (http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/aboriginals/)
    Prime Minister Paul Martin has promised to clean up the E. coli contaminated
    water. "We are very concerned about this totally unacceptable situation,"
    Martin told the House of Commons.
    The Opposition demanded repeatedly during question period Scott resign.
    Conservative Leader Stephen Harper called Scott "incompetent."
    Harper criticized Scott for visiting the community in August and refusing to
    drink the water, and then doing nothing for eight weeks after his return to
    Ottawa.
    Calgary Conservative Jim Prentice backed Harper, saying: "While the people of
    Kashechewan were being poisoned by E.coli and hepatitis, this minister
    slept."
    Martin defended his cabinet minister, accusing the Opposition of being
    insincere.
    "We've had cabinet meetings with aboriginal leaders, we've had round tables
    ... day after day, this Opposition has said nothing for aboriginal Canadians,
    day after day, they have voted against every single proposition we've had for
    aboriginal Canadians."
    Earlier in the day, Scott shouted down questions by reporters over whether he
    will resign after emerging from a cabinet meeting. Dozens of residents on
    the Cree reserve have had to leave the community to get medical treatment.
    The minister has been under scrutiny since the Ontario government decided to
    fly dozens of people from Kashechewan to Sudbury, 650 kilometres to the
    south. They are being treated for skin rashes and other medical problems
    aggravated by five years of on-and-off water contamination. Another 175 people are
    scheduled to be flown out Thursday night.
    Scott told CBC News that he met with representatives from Kashechewan in
    mid-August to discuss what should be done with the water treatment plant that
    seems to be at the root of the problem.
    A young protester draws attention to Kashechewan's water woes. (File Photo)
    "The community said they wanted no more Band-Aid solutions," Scott said about
    why he did not take immediate action to fix the problem. "They wanted to
    live like the rest of Canada, and I agreed with that ...
    Scott also rejected criticism of Ottawa's decision to put an intake pipe for
    the water treatment plant downstream along the Albany River from the
    reserve's sewage lagoon.
    "The problem is the community is within tidal waters, so within the course of
    the day, the tide comes up and reverses the flow," he said.
    The federal government did not ignore the immediate problems at Kashechewan
    while it worked on a long-term plan for the community, Scott insisted. Ottawa
    sent in extra water engineers, more health officials and "thousands – I think
    16,000 – 18-litre bottles [of water] a day."
    Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty has accused the federal government of being
    "missing in action" in addressing the problems at Kashechewan and other native
    communities living under boil-water orders.
    Scott denied that Ottawa has neglected its duties on Canada's reserves,
    saying that in 2003 it initiated a $1.6-billion, five-year plan to improve water
    services.
    * INDEPTH: _Boil-water advisories_
    (http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/wa...radvisory.html)


    That kind of talk did not go over well with Phil Fontaine, leader of the
    Assembly of First Nations.
    . "It needs to be addressed immediately. We can't afford to wait ...,
    Fontaine said in Ottawa on Thursday
    "There are at least 100 First Nations communities that are in a boil-water
    situation. There are at least 40 of those in Ontario."
    Kashechewan Chief Leo Friday called it a "travesty." "If [the federal
    government] had listened about four years ago, this would have been prevented."
    In 2001, he said, Kashechewan commissioned an engineer to look at its
    problem-plagued water service and other infrastructure in the community. The report
    was handed to Scott on Aug. 17 – it was the community's second meeting with
    the minister concerning its critical water situation.
    "We did the study ourselves, with our resources," he said. "At that time and
    to date, we never got anything from the government ...
    Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

    Comment


    • #3
      ************************************************** ************
      This Message Is Reprinted Under The Fair Use
      Doctrine Of International Copyright Law:
      _http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
      (http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html)
      ************************************************** ************

      FROM: THE TORONTO STAR NEWSPAPER

      _http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Articl
      e_Type1&c=Article&cid=1130449805546&call_pageid=96 8332188492&col=968793972154&
      t=TS_Home&DPL=IvsNDS%2f7ChAX&tacodalogin=yes_
      (http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/Con...cid=1130449805
      546&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968793972154&t=TS _Home&DPL=IvsNDS/7ChAX&tacod
      alogin=yes)

      (http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/Con...l=968793972154
      &t=TS_Home&DPL=IvsNDS/7ChAX&tacodalogin=yes)
      Hot dogs cost $11.19 on reserve
      Low incomes, high prices are among Kashechewan's enemies

      RICHARD BRENNAN
      QUEEN'S PARK BUREAU

      KASHECHEWAN RESERVE—Daily life here revolves around a few places, but none
      holds the kind of grip on residents that the Northern Store does.
      It is the only game in town, the modern-day version of the Hudson Bay
      trading post. But instead of fur changing hands, it's cold hard cash — and lots of
      it.
      A jar of Cheese Whiz costs $17.39, a box of concentrated Tide fetches
      $21.89, a package of 30 diapers sells for $21.99, a 24-pack of Cottonelle, $19.39
      and wieners, $11.19.
      "Remember, we have to fly this stuff in," said a manager, who prefaced this
      by saying he's been told not to talk to reporters.
      Most people on the reserve, about 450 kilometres north of Timmins, get by on
      welfare, shared 80-20 by Ottawa and the province respectively, and find it
      tough to get by. Many make ends meet by sharing the wild game brought home by
      the few who still hunt and carry on a traditional way of life.
      "Everything in that store is so expensive," said Peter Wesley, a janitor at
      the local elementary school, which is closed because of the E. coli scare.
      "We spend between $300 to $400. That lasts about four to five days and we are
      just buying dry goods and maybe some cheap meat like bologna.
      "It's been like that since I've lived here and I've lived here all my life,"
      said Wesley, who has 10 people living in his home, a house that five people
      would find crowded.
      In the winter the natives can get slightly cheaper food brought in on
      seasonal roads from Moosonee, about 125 kilometres away.
      While people don't have far to drive — it might take 15 minutes to drive
      around the reserve — they face high prices for gasoline, which recently sold for
      $1.85 a litre.
      James and Bernice Koosees, who both work, say they find it very difficult to
      make ends meet. He works at the elementary school as a teacher's assistant
      and she works at the high school as a guidance counsellor.
      "The prices in our store keep going up and up every month. The cost of
      living in our community is too much and that's why our people are hungry. They
      can't afford to eat nutritious stuff," Bernice said.
      Her concern over prices easily slides into her concern for the children who
      aren't getting an education because the elementary and high school are
      closed.
      "The children need that education. They kids are even talking about going
      back into the school despite the water because they are getting behind. Some
      students graduate this year and they want to finish it off. They need to
      graduate," she said.
      Dan Larose, a Grade 8 teacher in his second year at Kashechewan, is asked
      why he chose to live in a remote area like this, where the young people appear
      to have no future.
      "I'm here for the kids. I saw last year the difference I was making and
      that's why I came back. It's amazing to see the self-esteem rise in these kids,"
      the 34-year-old Sudbury native said.
      "I'm teaching them that Kash is not the end-all and be-all, that there is a
      whole different world out there. ... As far as I'm concerned, I would love to
      see those kids graduate from university in (a bachelor of education) program
      and take over my job."
      Kashechewan is supposedly a dry reserve, meaning that alcohol is not
      permitted, but all it really means is that it sells for prices that would make
      bootleggers in southern Ontario blush.
      A mickey sells for $50 to $80, while a 26-ounce bottle of liquor goes for
      more than $100. In the summertime, an ice-cold can of beer will fetch $10.
      "Alcoholism is a problem for so many people," said Douglas Wesley, 43, his
      broad shoulders framed by the doorway to his home.
      Wesley is familiar with the disease. He's headed to Thunder Bay for his
      fourth attempt to deal with his addiction. His wife Giselle, 47, has also been
      away trying to kick the habit.
      Over at the band office, charts and graphs cover the walls where David
      Wesley, the economic development officer, is trying to make Kashechewan a better
      place to live. But even for this upbeat individual, it seems like a losing
      battle.
      If someone opens up a takeout restaurant in his or her home it's considered
      major economic development.
      "Life is very poor here," he said. "There are unhealthy living standards.
      There are overcrowded conditions ... the houses don't meet building code
      standards. Inflation is very high. People cannot save money. We don't even have a
      bank."
      Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

      Comment


      • #4
        shyt ... i currently live on one of the first nations mentioned in some of these articles .. the great and infamous (thanks to our government - but that's another issue or the start of this issue ... who knows for sure?!?) Poundmaker Cree Nation in north central saskatchewan.

        and i haven't drank from the water coming from the taps since i was before i was 15 and i am now 33. we have been constantly under a boil water advisory for many reasons for many years. and have had to wash myself and my children in water that comes out of the faucet sometimes looking like tea. sometimes it smells like rotten eggs, other times like javex straight out of the jug (clorox for you american ppl). sometimes there's grass and other unnatural items in it ... things that shouldn't be coming out of your faucet.

        for years i have dealt with skin conditions with myself and my children - sometimes sooo bad that my daughters couldn't stand because of the sores.

        for some time before i got work and was on welfare, a whole whopping $240 for the whole month, i had to pay $15 a week ($60 a month) for bottled water and not to include the gas to go get this water. constantly having to monitor how much water you are using. but now that both me and my husband work we "splurged" and got a reverse osmosis water system for our house but i still get the water tested to "make sure."

        not everyone can afford to do this on their own and i still know of ppl who drink from the faucet here and now just because they can't afford to buy the bottled water. they don't even BOIL it first - some have conditioned themselves to the water. but others no - my nephew drank from the faucet at a friends house last summer and fell gravely ill and had to be hospitalized for a week or two...this after drinking a small glass of water ...

        i'm not going to hold my breath waiting for the federal/provincial/band government to do anything soon for any of the communities on the lists ... if i was after the first advisory i'd be long gone ...
        Watch your broken dreams...
        Dance in and out of the beams of a neon moon

        Comment


        • #5
          Chazziff, you guys are in my prayers. I know how serious this water deal must be because I have experienced a small bit of it myself.

          THANK YOU for talking about this too. I was getting kinda miffed last night because this is the second time I've posted about this and the last posting only got 6 views and this is a serious issue! This is one that more people need to be aware of in my opinion, and no one even had a word to say about it... but hey, white people at powwows has always been more important right?
          Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

          Comment


          • #6
            thanks blackbear - it pisses me off too. but hey for now there's nothing really i can do about other than what i have. it's not only native communities that have these problems with water - there's a lot of small non-native communities out there that have e. coli in their water ...

            nobody talked bout this until now, maybe something will be done. i was kinda shocked when i read that a first nation in sask (yellow quill) has a state the art water system for their members. i had to go there a couple of years ago for my grand-nephew's funeral and it was POOR community (to put it nicely). i guess it kinda matters WHAT you ask for - it was probably funded by INAC or at least partly. we finally got a waterline put in last year that runs the length of the reserve. we had a sistern until then and had to have water delivered by a truck once a week.

            the only ones that suffer in this situation are children. there is a high mortality rate for native infants in this country - maybe this could be one the contributing factors ....
            Watch your broken dreams...
            Dance in and out of the beams of a neon moon

            Comment


            • #7
              Okay, this is relaly annoying, I just wrote a reply and I couldn't post it,so I will write it again and post it later

              Comment


              • #8
                ************************************************** ************
                This Message Is Reprinted Under The Fair Use
                Doctrine Of International Copyright Law:
                _http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
                (http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html)
                ************************************************** ************

                FROM: CANADA.COM NEWS NETWORK - NATIONAL NEWS SECTION

                _http://www.canada.com/news/national/story.html?id=aa1a7ec2-e752-4559-b9e5-cc1
                9ce0f6aad_
                (http://www.canada.com/news/national/...5-cc19ce0f6aad)

                240 Ontario Reserve Residents Headed For Ottawa; Search On For More Shelter
                Steve Erwin Canadian Press

                Sunday, October 30, 2005

                1 | _2_
                (http://www.canada.com/news/national/...e0f6aad&page=2) | _NEXT >>_
                (http://www.canada.com/news/national/...e0f6aad&page=2) A
                native girl walks past moose heads on the Kashechewan native reserve in northern
                Ontario, Oct. 29, 2005. (CP/Jonathan Hayward)
                KASHECHEWAN FIRST NATION, Ont. (CP) - About 240 residents of this northern
                Ontario reserve were told Sunday that they will be evacuated to Ottawa but
                nearly 200 others were still waiting for news.
                Flights to the nation's capital will begin Monday and residents will be
                evacuated according to medical priority.
                The 240 residents were on a waiting list of more than 400 people who wanted
                to leave the reserve for medical treatment and assurances of clean drinking
                water.
                It's been more than two weeks since E. coli was discovered in the reserve's
                water supply and chlorine to kill the bacteria has worsened skin infections
                such as scabies and impetigo.
                Meanwhile, the search was on for more Ontario communities who can receive
                evacuees.
                Municipalities such as Sudbury and Cochrane accepted many of the 500 people
                who left the 1,900-resident reserve last week but they ran out of shelter.
                After the evacuees reach Ottawa there will still be approximately 190 people
                waiting for flights this week. Toronto has been rumoured as a likely
                destination.
                "There's a problem finding communities with the facilities to handle the
                people from Kashechewan," said Sgt. Peter Moon of a Canadian Ranger patrol group
                that is co-ordinating the evacuation of nearly half the community.
                Ottawa has offered undisclosed hotels and motels - which is what's needed to
                house people over a long period since it could be weeks, if not months,
                before residents are allowed to return to Kashechewan, located on the southern
                shores of James Bay.
                "If these people are going out for a long-term evacuation, they don't want to
                be in big gymnasiums," Moon said. "You've got families, you've got pregnant
                mothers, you've got mothers breast-feeding children. They need a degree of
                privacy and comfort."
                Those still remaining in Kashechewan are relying on bottled water shipped in
                by the federal government for consumption, though many residents are using
                taps and faucets for bathing.
                There is a more than adequate supply of bottled water and the military is
                setting up a water purification unit in a Kashechewan creek that could turn
                dirty water into an indefinite supply of clean drinking water.
                But some residents on the waiting list to leave are getting impatient.
                "This is my third day waiting now," grumbled Rachel Monias, who wants
                check-ups for her three-year-old daughter and six-month-old baby boy.
                Her son has a rash on his chest.
                "I don't know what it is," Monias said.
                Others don't want to leave, worried that abandoned homes and belongings make
                easy targets for thieves.
                "I don't want to leave my stuff, my valuables, behind," said Noah Wynn.
                There has been quiet speculation that some are asking to get on flights for
                what amounts to a free trip out of the isolated reserve. The evacuation is not
                mandatory.
                But Kashechewan Chief Leo Friday insists people are in urgent need of care.
                At the local Sunday church service, Friday gave a sermon to just three people
                in the 100-seat building. The minister was evacuated last week.
                "Pray for all those evacuated. For those in Cochrane, and for those in
                Sudbury. Pray for the sick and the elderly," Friday read from a pulpit at St.
                Paul's Anglican Church.
                It's unclear when residents can return to Kashechewan, but Friday hopes that
                determination will be made soon.
                "As soon as that (water treatment) plant is fixed up, we'll know," he said.
                Provincial environment and health ministry officials will get a better grip
                on when residents can return based on a report being filed by Jim Smith,
                Ontario's chief drinking water inspector. But that report may take as long as two
                weeks to prepare.
                Smith and a team of water system and sewage treatment experts have been
                assessing source water that goes into the plant and its effect on drinking water,
                as well as any mechanical problems at the plant.
                A boil-water advisory by Health Canada remains in place for Kashechewan and
                dozens of other northern Ontario reserves.
                "What needs to be done to lift the advisory is ensuring that the water system
                can reliably provide clean water - a day, a month, a year from now," Smith
                said.
                There has been speculation that at least some evacuees who have left
                Kashechewan have been diagnosed with gastrointestinal conditions related to E. coli.
                But officials here won't confirm whether the bacteria blamed for deaths of
                several Walkerton, Ont., residents several years ago has been detected.
                © The Canadian Press 2005
                Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

                Comment


                • #9
                  ************************************************** ************
                  This Message Is Reprinted Under The Fair Use
                  Doctrine Of International Copyright Law:
                  _http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
                  (http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html)
                  ************************************************** ************
                  FROM: CBC NEWS ONLINE
                  _http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/national/2005/10/30/kashechewan051030.html_
                  (http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/natio...wan051030.html)
                  McGuinty visits Kashechewan evacuees
                  Last Updated Sun, 30 Oct 2005 17:39:17 EST
                  _CBC News_ (http://www.cbc.ca/news/credit.html)

                  Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty made a surprise visit to Sudbury Sunday to
                  visit some of the evacuees from the Kashechewan reserve.
                  He spent about 45 minutes chatting with roughly 30 evacuees.
                  A dump truck carries boxes of bottled water into the Kashechewan native
                  reserve in northern Ontario Sunday, Oct. 30, 2005. (CP Photo/Jonathan Hayward)
                  Up to 1,000 people from the Kashechewan First Nation may be evacuated from
                  the remote community because of medical problems resulting from tainted water.
                  The federal and provincial governments share jurisdiction in the Cree
                  community of 1,900 on James Bay.
                  On Sunday, residents were waiting for the military to set up a water
                  purification unit.
                  Canadian Forces personnel arrived in Kashechewan on Saturday, but they said
                  clean water may not start flowing until Monday because of the time needed to
                  set up the equipment.
                  Once the unit is at full capacity, it will be able to produce 50,000 litres
                  of purified water a day.
                  Ontario has sent its Emergency Medical Assistance Team (EMAT) to Sudbury to
                  help deal with the health needs of the evacuees in the city.
                  EMAT, a team of emergency health-care professionals, has a self-sufficient
                  56-bed field unit with equipment and supplies, a communications centre,
                  electricity and water, the government said.
                  About a quarter of the 1,900 residents have been airlifted to the northern
                  Ontario communities of Timmins, Sudbury and Cochrane because of E. coli in
                  their drinking water.
                  Another 230 residents will be flown to Ottawa on Monday.
                  Meanwhile, there is a waiting list of 430 people who want to leave to get
                  medical treatment, or just access to clean water.
                  * FROM OCT. 25, 2005: _Ontario to airlift 1,000 from Cree reserve_
                  (http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/natio...wak051025.html)


                  * FROM OCT. 28, 2005: _Cheers greet news that reserve will be moved _
                  (http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/natio...reaction051028.
                  html)
                  * FROM OCT. 28, 2005: _Ont. seeks places for Kashechewan evacuees_
                  (http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/natio...uation051028.h
                  tml)
                  Ontario's drinking water inspector, Jim Smith, has said his report on
                  Kashechewan's water supply will be handed over to environment ministry officials on
                  Monday.
                  Smith said his recommendations could help determine when residents can return
                  to the reserve, 450 kilometres north of Timmins.
                  Kashechewan became a national embarrassment for the federal and Ontario
                  governments last week as its leaders travelled to Ottawa, then Toronto, to draw
                  attention to the state of their water.
                  The province ordered an evacuation because of residents who needed treatment
                  for skin conditions that included scabies and impetigo, which are aggravated
                  by over-chlorination of the water.
                  The government said the use of EMAT is a first since the unit was established
                  in 2004.




                  ************************************************** ************
                  This Message Is Reprinted Under The Fair Use
                  Doctrine Of International Copyright Law:
                  _http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
                  (http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html)
                  ************************************************** ************

                  FROM: THE TORONTO STAR NEWSPAPER

                  _http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Articl
                  e_Type1&c=Article&cid=1130687638303&call_pageid=96 8332188492&col=968793972154&
                  t=TS_Home&DPL=IvsNDS%2f7ChAX&tacodalogin=yes_
                  (http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/Con...cid=1130687638
                  303&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968793972154&t=TS _Home&DPL=IvsNDS/7ChAX&tacod
                  alogin=yes)

                  Reserve Evacuation Resumes


                  STEVE ERWIN
                  CANADIAN PRESS


                  (http://ads.thestar.com/click.ng/site...edesc=windowad) CHARLA JONES/TORONTO STAR Residents of the
                  Kashechewan Reserve begin boarding a plane that will evacuate them to other
                  locations in Ontario.



                  KASHECHEWAN FIRST NATION, Ont. - About 240 residents of this northern
                  Ontario reserve were told today they will be evacuated to Ottawa, but nearly 200
                  others were still waiting for news.
                  Flights to the nation's capital will begin Monday, and residents will be
                  evacuated according to medical priority.
                  The 240 residents were on a waiting list of more than 400 people who wanted
                  to leave the reserve for medical treatment and assurances of clean drinking
                  water.
                  It's been more than two weeks since E. coli was discovered in the reserve's
                  water supply, and chlorine to kill the bacteria has worsened skin infections
                  such as scabies and impetigo.
                  About 30 more Kashechewan residents were evacuated Sunday to nearby
                  reserves.
                  The search is still on for more Ontario communities who can receive
                  evacuees.
                  Municipalities such as Sudbury and Cochrane accepted many of the 500 people
                  who left the 1,900-resident reserve last week, but they ran out of shelter.
                  After the evacuees reach Ottawa there will still be approximately 190 people
                  waiting for flights this week. Toronto has been rumoured as a likely
                  destination.
                  "There's a problem finding communities with the facilities to handle the
                  people from Kashechewan," said Sgt. Peter Moon of a Canadian Ranger patrol group
                  that is co-ordinating the evacuation of nearly half the community.
                  Ottawa has offered undisclosed hotels and motels - which are needed to house
                  people over a long period since it could be weeks, if not months, before
                  residents are allowed to return to Kashechewan, located on the southern shores
                  of James Bay.
                  "If these people are going out for a long-term evacuation, they don't want
                  to be in big gymnasiums," Moon said. "You've got families, you've got pregnant
                  mothers, you've got mothers breast-feeding children. They need a degree of
                  privacy and comfort."
                  Those still remaining in Kashechewan are relying on bottled water shipped in
                  by the federal government for consumption, though many residents are using
                  taps and faucets for bathing.
                  There is an adequate supply of bottled water, and the military is setting up
                  a water purification unit in a Kashechewan creek that could turn dirty water
                  into a supply of clean drinking water.
                  But some residents on the waiting list to leave are getting impatient.
                  "This is my third day waiting now," grumbled Rachel Monias, who wants
                  check-ups for her 3-year-old daughter and 6-month-old son.
                  Her son has a rash on his chest.
                  "I don't know what it is," Monias said.
                  Others don't want to leave, worried that abandoned homes and belongings make
                  easy targets for thieves.
                  "I don't want to leave my stuff, my valuables, behind," said Noah Wynn.
                  There has been quiet speculation that some are asking to get on flights for
                  what amounts to a free trip out of the isolated reserve. The evacuation is
                  not mandatory.
                  But Kashechewan Chief Leo Friday insists people are in urgent need of care.
                  At the local Sunday church service, Friday gave a sermon to just three
                  people in the 100-seat building. The minister was evacuated last week.
                  "Pray for all those evacuated. For those in Cochrane, and for those in
                  Sudbury. Pray for the sick and the elderly," Friday read from a pulpit at St.
                  Paul's Anglican Church.
                  It's unclear when residents can return to Kashechewan, but Friday hopes that
                  determination will be made soon.
                  "As soon as that (water treatment) plant is fixed up, we'll know," he said.
                  Provincial environment and Health Ministry officials will get a better grip
                  on when residents can return based on a report being filed by Jim Smith,
                  Ontario's chief drinking water inspector. But that report may take as long as two
                  weeks to prepare.
                  Smith and a team of water system and sewage treatment experts have been
                  assessing source water that goes into the plant and its effect on drinking water,
                  as well as any mechanical problems at the plant.
                  A boil-water advisory by Health Canada remains in place for Kashechewan and
                  dozens of other northern Ontario reserves.
                  "What needs to be done to lift the advisory is ensuring that the water
                  system can reliably provide clean water - a day, a month, a year from now," Smith
                  said.
                  There has been speculation that at least some evacuees who have left
                  Kashechewan have been diagnosed with gastrointestinal conditions related to E. coli.
                  But officials here won't confirm whether the bacteria blamed for deaths of
                  several Walkerton, Ont., residents several years ago has been detected.
                  Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    i have been really thinking about what the severity of what these people have had to deal with - and how our situation differs from there's. i have been saying prayers for them ... i can't imagine having to be evacuated having to leave my home but at the same time i would have to think of my children first and putting their health and safety first.
                    Watch your broken dreams...
                    Dance in and out of the beams of a neon moon

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      it sucks man...

                      but i had to create an account just to post in this particular thread. conflict of interest prohibits me from saying anything derogatory against my place of work..but for all of you who will recognize my writing style - then it's all good. you know who i be.

                      not only to i have to abide my conflict of interest policies - i also feel terribly conflicted about the way our people are being treated. i do know that the gov't is swiftly putting together and engaging plans that will get the Natives in Kash away form the contaminents - but this is a short term Band-Aid for a long term problem.

                      Last week, I participated in a candle light vigil on the Hill which essentially tore me apart. I mean, my rez is just as tore up and polluted - in fact, we were mentionned during Question Period by an Alberta Premier .. but just to see the pictures and here, first hand, the abhorrent conditions that are currently being experienced in this country. It killed me to hear about people having to sleep in shifts because there wasn't enough room on the floors (let along beds) for everyone to sleep at teh same time. Or children suffering from impetego and scabies due to the excessive amounts of chlorine being pumped into the water to coutneract the e-Coli. But what got me the most is how the residential school survivors must feel like being encaged once again. This time by land mass that the gov't likes to call "dykes". It's bad enough to be placed on barren land prone to flooding - but to be completely excluded from society? To be held prisoner in your own community. No different than conecntration camps man. It's deplorable that in this day and age - people are being forced to live like barbarians. In a country that prides intself in it's humanitarian and global aide efforts.

                      A document has since been released indicating that a multitude (we're talking close to 100) communities that are currently under BWA's (Boil Water Advisories) - this is unacceptable, yall! Who remembers Walkerton? Remember the media coverage and subsequent frenzy surrounding this small community that expereinced deaths form tainted water? Well, what about these hundreds of communities that face death every single day ? Can you imagine not taking a shower for weeks on end because you are terrified of what may be in the water? Wathcing your children grow ill? Witnessing your elders becomming weak? Not right, man. It just ain't right.

                      Write your MP, submit comments on Globe and Mail and other news sites. Express your critisism of the state of affairs. But most of all, send your prayers out to our people. Let them know we stand in solidarity and Creator will pull them through.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by what the deuce?
                        A document has since been released indicating that a multitude (we're talking close to 100) communities that are currently under BWA's (Boil Water Advisories) - this is unacceptable, yall! Who remembers Walkerton? Remember the media coverage and subsequent frenzy surrounding this small community that expereinced deaths form tainted water? Well, what about these hundreds of communities that face death every single day ? Can you imagine not taking a shower for weeks on end because you are terrified of what may be in the water? Wathcing your children grow ill? Witnessing your elders becomming weak? Not right, man. It just ain't right.

                        Write your MP, submit comments on Globe and Mail and other news sites. Express your critisism of the state of affairs. But most of all, send your prayers out to our people. Let them know we stand in solidarity and Creator will pull them through.
                        that whole walkerton situation was handled sooo differently. the nation wide media coverage for weeks ... and the two men who were responsible for making sure that the community water suppy are currently serving jail time for their "in"actions - however U want to view what they did.

                        the people in charge of making sure the first nations water supplies are mostly uneducated and untrained people. most were the "water man" - who drove a water truck and delivered water to the houses on a weekly basis.

                        then when the so called water treatment plants were built, they were given a manual to read on the requirements to keep the water safe and to keep the plant "running smoothly." with a band counsellor with the water treatment plant in their portfolio - with the same understanding of the manual/water safety requirements.

                        i sincerely doubt any of the people who are in charge of the water safety for the first nations will be facing jail time ...

                        i too have had to watch Elders who are sick and getting weak. they drink the water straight from the tap - some without the understanding of what it means to have contaminated water, "waters - water" to them and has "always" been safe ... no understanding the importance of WHY you have to boil it first, this too can be said some of the first nation general public.

                        i have had to watch my own children suffer with skin ailments, sometimes soo bad they couldn't walk. i can remember when i was their age and having the same skin problems. and here's me trying to keep them clean with tainted water - unaware that we were even under a boil water advisory. sometimes having to give them baths in chlorine smelling water ... it's only now that after I (me and my spouse) could afford to install a reverse osmosis system in our home that it has been controllable ... and i'm not even on one of the "bad" reserves!!
                        Watch your broken dreams...
                        Dance in and out of the beams of a neon moon

                        Comment

                        Join the online community forum celebrating Native American Culture, Pow Wows, tribes, music, art, and history.

                        Related Topics

                        Collapse

                        Trending

                        Collapse

                        There are no results that meet this criteria.

                        Sidebar Ad

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X