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“Do you have Native American DNA?”

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  • Mama Bear
    replied
    Originally posted by ndnlady1306
    I think that being Native is to live, breathe, eat, drink, sleep, and practice all of the Native traditions that have been passed down from generations long ago.
    I totally agree with you ndnlady!
    Of course there may be exceptions, like adoption out to whites.

    These ndns may want to connect with their tribe and heritages. In that instance their should be some family left from that tribe to help that person, if there is not, I think it would be more hard to join with their tribe, without the proper paperwork.



    Originally posted by ndnlady1306
    If someone is claming Cherokee ancestory from a Cherokee princess, they are most likely lying. There were no princes until about 94 years age, and that was brought about by the council for the annual fair held in October.

    LOL.. I don't know about princes and princesses!

    Although I am white and claim being white cause I think I look purty white, I do have indian blood from my Fathers side, and on both Grandparents side, that run all through NC, TN border, to be specific Hanging Dog, Madison, Grape Creek,Cherokee, and Marshall, NC. I have traced it back as far as 1740. Its just that from about 1840 there were marriages to white people.
    Why?.. possibly assimilation, love , who really knows that far back.
    Still looking into a part of that.



    Originally posted by ndnlady1306
    All non-natives who are trying to be who they are not are just denying themselves out of their own heritage and culture. I think that it is sad when people are so lost that they don't who they are so they try to borrow other peoples lives and thier past.
    Would that be the true definition of a wannabe, hobbyist?
    I think so.


    To be of euro/ native descent and wanting to learn more about Native Americans and their history, is part of my heritage and ancestory. I do not want to participate in ceremony or get a card, just learn alittle more about Native's and the issues at hand for them.

    What about all the DNA reasearch going on?

    Lots of Native Tribes don't want to submit DNA to scientist, because they all have their stories of Creation and feel that they don't feel the need to explore their Mitcondrial DNA..

    I wonder if they did would they want to know the results?
    Can I get a view point from a native, please?

    Leave a comment:


  • ndnlady1306
    replied
    I think that being Native is to live, breathe, eat, drink, sleep, and practice all of the Native traditions that have been passed down from generations long ago. If someone is claming Cherokee ancestory from a Cherokee princess, they are most likely lying. There were no princes until about 94 years age, and that was brought about by the council for the annual fair held in October.
    All non-natives who are trying to be who they are not are just denying themselves out of their own heritage and culture. I think that it is sad when people are so lost that they don't who they are so they try to borrow other peoples lives and thier past.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mama Bear
    replied
    I guess, if that were the case, there should be a line beside each entry to describe ancestry.
    But since the government doesn't work like that, check two or three boxes and mess with their minds...

    I think the point being made by that statement is.. if you claim to be Native American, do you or were you raised with some traditional heritage? Not just because 3 generations back your grandma was 1/2 native.

    Leave a comment:


  • greagirl
    replied
    Another Point of Interest...

    When I went to register my son in school, I noticed that under the racial profiles for Native American it had in parenthesis "actively practicing culture". Strange, I thought whether or not you wanted to be Native American or actively practice traditional cuture, if that's in your blood line, it's in your bloodline. Of course they don't say African American "actively speaking African language" or Caucasian "not mixed with any other race". They did however have under one of the other categories "not being of hispanic heritage".... as if having some hispanic heritage voids all other parts of one's ancestory! (laugh) I protested stating that I wanted all of my son's racial identity on his school record and asked when mixed race people were going to able to freely express that mixture without being forced by bureacracies to place themselves in one little box. Strangely enough, they had no answer for me. (grin)

    Leave a comment:


  • ~Journey~
    started a topic “Do you have Native American DNA?”

    “Do you have Native American DNA?”

    That is the question asked by Terry Carmichael, vice president for sales and marketing at GeneTree, whose advertising asks, “Do you have Native American DNA?”

    How do you feel about this?

    Is it the DNA or traditions passed down thru known bloodlines?



    Link for article....

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7298465/



    By Adam Tanner
    Updated: 10:15 p.m. ET March 25, 2005

    SAN FRANCISCO - The United States has treated its indigenous people poorly for much of its history, yet today thousands of people are anxious to show their Native American heritage and are turning to DNA testing for help.

    Some white Americans have long claimed distant ties to Cherokee princesses or other legendary figures among the peoples whom explorer Christopher Columbus mistakenly called Indians.

    Now Indian heritage — which can make a person eligible for federal assistance programs, qualify them for a share of tribal casino profits, or just satisfy their curiosity — can be determined through genetic testing. Advances in DNA screening have provided new tools to document Native American ancestry, although some say such data are open to be interpretation.


    “If you are interested in determining your eligibility for Native American rights or just want to satisfy your curiosity, our ancestry DNA test is the only method available for this purpose today,” one firm, Genelex, advertises.


    A question of fractions
    Although U.S. citizens typically know the broad outlines of their ancestry, for Native Americans the exact fractions of their heritage can take on heightened importance.

    Nineteenth-century treaties obligate the U.S. government to provide education, health care and other services to many tribes. Indian sovereignty also means tribes can set up casinos on reservations. Indian casinos now generate $18 billion annually, and the numbers are growing.

    Many tribes set as a membership standard that a person must have at least one Indian grandparent or one great-grandparent. Others among the 562 federally recognized tribes require links to members on a tribal membership roll in past generations.

    With individuals seeking to affirm membership in recognized tribes and dozens of unrecognized tribes seeking federal acknowledgment, commercial firms have in the last two years stepped up marketing of genetic ancestry tests. A positive test result is not sufficient to enable someone to claim Indian benefits, because they must prove a link to a specific tribe.

    “Nobody else in this nation has to prove their ancestry except for American Indians,” said Ken Adams, chief of the Upper Mattaponni Tribe in Virginia, which is not recognized by the U.S. government. “It’s so ironic, because we were the original ones.”

    Three types of tests
    Since Genelex started offering the test more than a year ago, 600 people have paid $395 to learn the degree of their Native American heritage, said Kristine Ashcraft, director of client relations.

    Firms such as Genelex offer three types of tests: on male ancestors, on female ancestors, and a third to determine a percentage of Native American, East Asian, Indo-European and African heritage.

    DNAPrint, a company based in Sarasota, Fla., processes that third test, and has done it for 12,000 to 13,000 people since 2000, said firm director Richard Gabriel. DNAPrint uses data from South American Indians as a genetic reference point, he said.

    Testing has its limits
    Mark Shriver, an anthropologist at Pennsylvania State University who helped develop the DNAPrint ancestry test, cautions that without a filled-out family history, the DNA results prove little.

    “Just simple belief in a test without considering all the other data is, you know, foolish,” he said. “The science is not simply true and objective. ... It is one clue in the picture.”

    He cited one of his graduate students from France, whose test found a 14 percent Native American heritage. He said that number was likely the result of intermixing following the 13th-century invasion of Europe by Mongols, who hailed from the same region of Asia as the forefathers of Native Americans.

    The DNA tests are also unable to differentiate between Indian tribes.

    Who is an Indian?
    The issue of who is an Indian also hangs over future generations. For members whose tribes share revenues from casino operations, marrying outside the tribe could have major financial implications.

    As in many cultures, some parents encourage children to marry within the tribe, but some, especially in smaller tribes, see the request as very limiting.

    “Everyone in the tribe is a distant cousin,” complained one 18-year-old Indian woman who works at a casino in the Pueblo of Acoma, N.M. She hoped to marry outside the tribe.

    As important as identity is in Native American culture, for some the motivation for a DNA test is just curiosity.

    “It’s growing in popularity much faster than any of our expectations,” said Terry Carmichael, vice president for sales and marketing at GeneTree, whose advertising asks, “Do you have Native American DNA?”

    “A lot of people out there primarily want to find out if they have Native American ancestry, not for purposes of claiming rights to a casino, but more for their own understanding,” he said. “They want to be able to understand their ancestry a little bit more.”

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