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  • Indians Want Reality Of Sovereignty -- Their Own Embassy

    ************************************************** ******************
    This Message Is Reprinted Under The FAIR USE
    Doctrine Of International Copyright Law:
    _http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
    (http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html)
    ************************************************** ******************
    FROM: THE MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE NEWSPAPER
    _http://www.startribune.com/587/story/359902.html_
    (http://www.startribune.com/587/story/359902.html)
    Indians Want Reality Of Sovereignty -- Their Own Embassy
    One Minnesota tribe has put up 'challenge' money to buy a building along
    Embassy Row in the nation's capital.


    Kevin Diaz, Star Tribune
    Last update: April 08, 2006 – 10:07 PM





    WASHINGTON -- It's a question from one of the dustbins of history: If
    American Indian tribes are truly sovereign nations, why don't they have an embassy
    in the nation's capital?


    It was one of the demands of Vernon Bellecourt and other American Indian
    Movement leaders from Minnesota when they occupied the Bureau of Indian Affairs
    (BIA) in Washington in November 1972.
    Now the idea is being revived by a more prosperous Minnesota group: The
    Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, owners of Mystic Lake Casino. The tribe has
    put up a $1 million "challenge grant" to buy a building on Massachusetts
    Avenue -- known as "Embassy Row" -- which would house the National Congress of
    American Indians, the nation's oldest Native American advocacy organization.
    An Embassy of Tribal Nations -- even if it doesn't achieve full diplomatic
    status like those of foreign nations -- is seen by backers as a symbol of
    American Indians' evolution from an era of reservations and tribal allotments to
    the modern era of tribal government.
    Among the first to get involved were the Prairie Island Sioux Community,
    owners of the Treasure Island Casino, and former BIA chief Dave Anderson,
    founder of the Minnesota-based Famous Dave's BBQ chain. They have each contributed
    $50,000.
    Whether many Indian tribes nationwide respond still remains to be seen. So
    far, the effort has received its biggest push from Minnesota, a reflection of
    the new wealth of the Mdewakanton Sioux, the Prairie Island Sioux Community,
    and other Indian tribes that rely on their sovereign status to run profitable
    casinos with little state interference.
    Bellecourt says he's happy to see the idea of an embassy resurrected, as long
    as "it does something for Indian people and it's not just another building
    with a name."
    Whatever else it becomes, an embassy could at least be a more suitable home
    for Indian leaders who come to Washington, says the American Indian Congress'
    executive director, Jackie Johnson.
    For now, the organization leases offices above the Luna Grill Diner, sharing
    a block just off of DuPont Circle with a psychic reader and Fatty's Tattooz
    and Body Piercing.
    The building it wants is a modern five-story office building next to the
    Embassy of Chile just a few blocks away.
    "So close," Johnson says, "and yet so far."
    The group still has a long way to go on its $12 million fundraising goal
    before any of the nation's 562 tribal flags fly above the building, now the home
    of the National Cable & Telecommunications Association.
    "It's a tremendous financial leap for a historically under-funded
    non-profit," Johnson said.
    Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Vice Chairman Glynn Crooks said that while he
    understands that tribes across the nation have pressing social, health and
    education needs, there's enough wealth in Indian Country to create an Embassy of
    Tribal Nations.
    "I know there are many tribes that aren't able to give that much, but I also
    know that there are a lot of tribes that can," he said.
    American Indian Congress President Joe Garcia, who would be the de-facto
    "ambassador," called the Minnesota tribe's gift "a huge step in securing a home
    in Washington."
    For too long, Anderson said, Indian concerns have been represented in
    Washington mainly by the BIA, an agency that falls under the vast bureaucracy of
    the Interior Department.
    Anderson said it is now time to recognize the reality of Indian sovereignty,
    a concept recognized by the framers of the U.S. Constitution.
    "It's amazing that you can have every other country represented in
    Washington, but not the people who were here to greet the 'first visitors,' " Anderson
    said. "It would be historic."
    As Anderson and others see it, a new embassy would become the center for
    doing much of what the American Indian Congress already does: Push for full
    federal funding of Indian health and service programs, mediate disputes over
    Indian trust funds, and serve as a political voice for tribes.
    Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

  • #2
    Well, I guess an embassy to prove our sovereignty (as limited as it is) will be a lot easier to attain than forming a trained American Indian army or printing our own American Indian money.
    Powwows will continue to evolve in many directions. It is inevitable.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by WhoMe
      Well, I guess an embassy to prove our sovereignty (as limited as it is) will be a lot easier to attain than forming a trained American Indian army or printing our own American Indian money.
      could be like the euro ... a standard indian currency
      Oh yeah, I used to know Quentin...He's a real...He's a real Jerky

      ~Flat Beat~

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Emmy
        could be like the euro ... a standard indian currency

        Whose picture would we put on the Indian 3-dollar bill?
        Powwows will continue to evolve in many directions. It is inevitable.

        Comment


        • #5
          <-- all hail mots...queen of turtle island

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by WhoMe
            Whose picture would we put on the Indian 3-dollar bill?

            why, you're pic WhoMe, WhoElse?

            I'm curious about this National Congress of American Indians. Do they have any voice or clout nationally at this point, and if not, why? They could and should speak for the thousands, common interest things.

            Comment


            • #7
              We would need our own gold buillion to print our own money... ndn mini for knoxs'.

              But why a three dollar bill? How about the buck, ninety five bill? ROFLMAO!!
              Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by streamhawk
                why, you're pic WhoMe, WhoElse?

                I'm curious about this National Congress of American Indians. Do they have any voice or clout nationally at this point, and if not, why? They could and should speak for the thousands, common interest things.


                Oh heck no. My mug would ruin it. *L

                NCAI does lobby on behalf of thousands of Indians to national political decision makers.

                Too bad they don't make monetary contributions to these decision makers.

                Money talks in Washington.
                Powwows will continue to evolve in many directions. It is inevitable.

                Comment

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