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A Funny Thing About Extinctions – Meet The Extinct Taino’s

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  • A Funny Thing About Extinctions – Meet The Extinct Taino’s

    The truth is that it is not really funny. I am saddened by the extinction of many species and populations. The Great Spirit put all plants, insects, birds and animals on Mother Earth, because all have an important role to play in the grand scheme of life.

    According to the Utah Education Network, about 125 bird species and 60 species of mammals have gone extinct since the year 1600. Another 1100 bird and mammal species are under a considerable threat of extinction today. If one takes into account invertebrates and plants into the near-extinction considerations, a full 20,000 species are at-risk of imminent extinction. http://www.uen.org/utahlink/activities/view_activity.cgi?activity_id=3820

    In the early 1500’s, the dodo birds were found living on three islands east of Madagascar, off the eastern coast of Africa. The dodo’s made their homes in Mauricio, Reunion and Rodriguez Islands. Men hunted the flightless dodo birds and stole their eggs, leading to the annihilation of a species. The last recorded sighting of a live dodo bird was in 1681. If it were not for the movie Ice Age, most of our children would not even comprehend what this bird had looked like in life.

    Hands down, humans account for more extinctions than any other factor. Man has hastened the extinctions of many animal species through hunting, habitat destruction, and by introducing non-native species that prey on the natives or compete for the same resources. By and large, most experts will tell you that the leading cause of species extinction is habitat destruction, and as humans progress, we are encroaching on the living space of even more species.

    Contrary to the European viewpoint, people were put on this earth to protect Mother Nature’s resources. The species of the earth have been put here to help us to survive generations, rather than to feast fat and happy for a single generation. If we do not protect species in the present, we will have to continue relying on the Twentieth Century Fox animators to teach our children of our past.

    The Story of the Extinction of the Taino Nation…

    Another story in the chain of extinctions is the story of the Arawakan Taino Nation (http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/41/013.html). The popular story is that Christopher Columbus “discovered” the America’s in 1492, and during his stay in the region, he also “discovered” the Taino people who lived on the various islands of the Caribbean, including the Bahamas and the Greater and Lesser Antilles.

    It is storied that within a few years of Columbus’ arrival in the Caribbean, the great Taino Nation had been decimated. The same story professes that by 1650, the Jatibonicu Taino were an extinct race of people. Even respected story tellers have given themselves to the telling of this story as fact. Here are some examples:

    • In a story called “The American Empire,” written by: Wade Frazier. (http://www.ahealedplanet.net/america.htm), two statements were made on this account: 1) the Taino people were “were completely extinct long before the year 1600,” and 2) the story of the Taino’s is “the only complete genocide of millions of people in world history.”
    • In a document written for the Portland Public Schools in 1993 titled “American Indian Civilizations and the Social Sciences” and written by Chris R. Landon, states on page 190 in the section for the year 1650: “the Arawakan Taino, Ciboney, and Ciguayo had been exterminated…” (http://www.pps.k12.or.us/depts-c/mc-me/be-ai-ss.pdf)
    • In a document written for http://www.ProjectSouth.org, called “The Original Southerners: The Native Peoples of the American South,” it was stated again that “the Taino People were extinct by 1650.” Notably, all three documents point to chapter four of the Howard Zinn book as the source of their statement.
    • All three documents reference the source material to be the 1980 book called “A People's History of the United States,” written by Howard Zinn, who holds his Ph.D. in history. Zinn’s book is recommended reading in most educational venues.

    Back From The World Of Extinction

    If science fails to document the existence of a particular species for a number of years, that species will be moved to the “Extinct” or “Extinct In The Wild” status. But if the species does a better job of hiding than the searcher does searching, existing species can remain hidden for years or generations. Here are some examples:

    • The Philippines Bare-backed Fruit Bat was declared extinct in 1964. Yet, this bat was rediscovered to exist on the Philippine islands of Cebu and Negros, in 2000 and 2003 respectively.

    • The world-famous Komodo Dragon was long-considered to be a myth until 1912, when it was finally “discovered” by science.

    • The coelacanth is a bluish-colored fish that grows to be six-feet in length. It had been noted in the fossil records from 400 million to 65 million years ago, and then it disappeared from the fossil records. Science had written off the coelacanth to extinction until one was found in a fisherman’s catch off the coast of South Africa in 1938. It took another 14 years before another was caught and validated by science in 1952.

    The first item was documented by the “International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources” website, which hosts the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species at: http://www.iucnredlist.org/info/faq#trends-6

    The second and third items, as well as other “previously-considered to be extinct” creatures, were documented on a crypto zoology website at: http://www.wyrdology.com/cryptozoology/found.html

    Scientists Are Smarter Than Historians And Government Bureaucrats…

    There may be a few historians who want to kick my native behind, but I stand behind my words! The white man’s historians are not as smart as they would like you to believe.

    You may be asking yourself why I would make such a bold proclamation. Well, it is really simple… Scientists will change their story if they see evidence that has proved their original ideas wrong. Historians on the other hand will stick to their story, even in the face of massive evidence to the contrary!

    The conqueror has always written history. In this case, the Spaniards came to conquer, and then the Spaniards wrote in their history books that the only remaining native Taino blood was passed from the native women who married the Spaniards and the women who married the Africans that were shipped into the region to work as slaves. It was said that the Taino Tribe and society had been wiped out by the mid 1600’s, as a result of wars with the Spaniards. The Spaniards then declared that the Jatibonicu Taino Tribal Nation of Boriken had gone extinct through interbreeding with the modern residents of Puerto Rico. This is the white man’s historical record, and the white man seems all too happy to stick to their story, despite evidence to the contrary.

    Historians, Please Take Note… DNA Does Not Lie

    This is not a case where the “extinct” did a better job of hiding than the searchers did searching. The native Taino people have been under the world’s collective nose all along. They have not been hiding from the world; rather historians and governments have chosen to continue to deny the existence of the Taino Nation.

    To get to the truth of this story, the U.S. National Science Foundation funded Dr. Juan Martinez Cruzado, a geneticist from the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez, who designed an island-wide DNA survey. In 2003, Rick Kearns of Indian Country Today (http://www.indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1065462184) profiled the results compiled as a result of that study.

    Cruzado’s study revealed that 61% of the Puerto Rican population had Amerindian Mitochondrial DNA in their test samples. In a nutshell, this means that 61% of the Puerto Rican population is from the native Jatibonicu Taino bloodline.

    If You Still Have Questions

    My old friend Peter Torres has been working a long time to help the Jatibonicu Taino Tribal Nation of Boriken gain recognition in the global community. Peter Guaniel (Son of Noble Bird) Torres is a tribal representative, who works for the tribal Council Government Office of Tribal Affairs, out of Southern New Jersey.

    His father is Chief Pedro Guanikeyu (Noble Bird of the White Earth) Torres, the Principal Chief of the Jatibonicu Taino Tribal Nation of Boriken.

    You can learn more about the Taino Nation at:
    http://www.taino-tribe.org/jatiboni.html

    Who Is The Authority Source For The History Of A Nation?

    Most public education systems entrust the history of the Taino Tribe to historian Howard Zinn, Ph.D., the most quoted “expert” concerning the fate of the Taino people.

    It has been four years since Cruzado’s monumental DNA study that proved that the Jatibonicu Taino Tribal Nation of Boriken had survived history, and yet, historians, educators, and government employees continue to stick to their story about the extinction of the Taino People! Even the Wikipedia editors try to diminish the status of the Jatibonicu Taino Tribal Nation of Boriken, by describing them in terms like “neo-Taino” and “Taino-like cultures” and taking the Taino history from the Spanish government’s point-of-view. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neo-Taino_nations)

    How can these “experts” in good conscience continue to deny a people who live to this day, a people who still have their own official governing council, and a people whose DNA validates their native Jatibonicu Taino bloodline?

    Perhaps they continue to deny the obvious, because there are political gains for them in denial.

    According to José Barreiro, the founding editor of the Native American Journal, the Taino history was “Ignored by most researchers and written out of Cuban national histories throughout the twentieth century. It is nevertheless a fact that Cuban Indians fought first for the Spanish army and then for the insurrection during the Cuban War of Independence of 1895.” (http://www.kacike.org/Barreiro.html)

    But, as my tribal elders have always told me, the truth has no place in the schools and stories of the white man. I believe Barreiro summed it up the best when he said in one of his articles, “Remember your culture. Don't forget who wrote the history.”

    The Future Of Our History

    With the advent of the Internet, our First Nation’s people have been given an opportunity to tell our history the way that our elders have told it to us for generations. At http://www.MyRezSpace.com, we have set up a community for elders to put our ancient histories into a digital format that can survive the test of time and the diminishing influence of people like Zinn and the Wikipedia editors.

    If you would like to know the real history of our First Nations’ native peoples, please visit MyRezSpace.com to learn more.
    Last edited by tribalwebhost; 05-10-2007, 10:45 AM. Reason: some minor corrections made on factual accuracy
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  • #2
    There are colonial records that show that an extreme amount of Tuscaroras (and probably many other carolinian indians) were shipped to the Carribean to work as slaves. And we know that many of the carribean people are tri-racial... so by genocide and extinct, do they mean killed off/died off or mixed and assimilated to the point that there was no distinctive culture and no distinctive race left?
    Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

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    • #3
      I wonder...

      If Ignorance will ever be Extinct.....
      "She also has a very soft skin. The only trouble with snake women is they copulate with horses, which makes them strange to me. She say's she doesn't. That's why I call her "Doesn't Like Horses". But, of course, she's lying."

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      • #4
        Wow Blackbear I didn't know that Tuscarora were sent to the Caribbean. Yes I hate the notion of extinction. Supposedly I'm supposed to be extinct too. I think at least for Central, South America and the Caribbean people tend to think if you're not fullblooded then you're not anything at all. People are so brainwashed to believe that an Amerindian there has to be some exotic painted human wearing a loincloth and feathers for them to be authentic (extra Indigenous points if you're wearing a lip disk or earlobe plugs). God help you if you wear blue jeans and call yourself Indigenous. *rolls eyes*

        I think Taino get a lot more flack than Kalinago people simply because the Spanish intermarried with them from very early on, but that doesn't mean they are extinct. Lots of the culture, ceremonies and even parts of the language have been passed down. I hear the Taino community in Cuba is really strong.
        Cariblanguage.org

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        • #5
          I would like to see an Taino dancer at a Pow Wow. To see what their regalia is like.
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Blackbear View Post
            There are colonial records that show that an extreme amount of Tuscaroras (and probably many other carolinian indians) were shipped to the Carribean to work as slaves. And we know that many of the carribean people are tri-racial... so by genocide and extinct, do they mean killed off/died off or mixed and assimilated to the point that there was no distinctive culture and no distinctive race left?
            Abenakis were also used as slaves. They were sent to the Lousiana area.
            I'm not mean....You're just a sissy


            http://www.mytribalspace.com/tribal/...ame_ndngirl70/
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            • #7
              Originally posted by kgirl7 View Post
              Wow Blackbear I didn't know that Tuscarora were sent to the Caribbean.
              yep, in one colonial record alone they recorded over 700 being shipped there.

              Yes I hate the notion of extinction. Supposedly I'm supposed to be extinct too. I think at least for Central, South America and the Caribbean people tend to think if you're not fullblooded then you're not anything at all. People are so brainwashed to believe that an Amerindian there has to be some exotic painted human wearing a loincloth and feathers for them to be authentic (extra Indigenous points if you're wearing a lip disk or earlobe plugs). God help you if you wear blue jeans and call yourself Indigenous. *rolls eyes*

              I think Taino get a lot more flack than Kalinago people simply because the Spanish intermarried with them from very early on, but that doesn't mean they are extinct.
              Lots of the culture, ceremonies and even parts of the language have been passed down. I hear the Taino community in Cuba is really strong.
              That's what I was trying to say! I was just having a hard time fathoming this notion that they were extinct when there are plenty of people who simply know better. They were'nt wiped out by war mongers and they did'nt lose everything so what do they mean by extinction? And the only thing I could gather is the fact that they are mixed people... and still today people want to overlook someone's identity because they have two or more races in them.
              Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

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              • #8
                I remember reading somewhere last year that there were students at Carlisle listed as "Puerto Rican Indian" so they were alive enough for the school to try to assimilate them...that's too bad Howard Zinn's book is the source of the myth of Taino extinction because he's an interesting writer.

                Oneida dreamer, one of my good friends is Taino and brought several of the leaders in his tribe to come to our college powwow. They did some Taino dances and we all joined in. I'll see if I have any pictures or maybe I can ask him to email me some. It was pretty cool.

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                • #9
                  Last year, I planted a Dawn Redwood in our front yard. It is an almost common nursery tree now, but once thought to be extinct until botanists "discovered" them growing in central China. It is a fairly unique species in that it is a deciduous conifer -- it has tiny needle-like leaves that makes it look like an evergreen tree, but they turn tan in the fall and drop off for the winter, to be replaced by new leaves in the spring.

                  But it makes me wonder: what will eventually happen to the world with all of the cross-bred plants now being produced? Trees once not hardy enough to survive northern winters are now hardy to temperatures well below freezing. But then they breed like weeds and take over areas and crowd out the native trees, since they are used to aggressive competition from the hosts of species in the warmer climates.

                  Will the "extinct" species only be replaced by some more recent concoction?
                  "Friends don't let friends drink decaf..."
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