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  • rocks_az
    replied
    THE VIDEO CLIP SHOWS THE CROW NATION ABOUT 5 MINS 30 SECS N2 DA VIDEO...IF YA WANNA SEE...

    <object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/I3S3K97dLZ8&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/I3S3K97dLZ8&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    There were actually 11 tribes invited to be in the inaugural parade. The Eastern Shoshone tribe was one of them! Of course, we only caught a glimpse of one kid and then COMMERCIAL!!!

    But the Crow tribal delegation was looking superb on horseback in their regalia, and long Pendleton coats. Them Crows know how to parade!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Blackbear
    replied
    Obama did not specifically mention American Indians in his address. He did
    say that the time has come to recognize that “all are equal, all are free, and
    all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.”


    If you are American... remember he didn't specifically mention any of us in this address because we are Native Nations.

    He later added: “…we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a
    weakness.”


    See.... how has this been a strength for us? When has it been a strength for us?

    Upon winning the presidency in November, Obama mentioned American Indians in
    his acceptance speech, and he has said more than once that he believes there
    is a need to build a strong “nation-to-nation relationship” with tribes and
    Native people


    Tribes and Native people huh? Who wrote that for him? The wording does not appear sincere or written by someone who knows what they are talking about.

    Obama did mention tribes in his inaugural speech, but not specifically
    Indian tribes: “…we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday
    pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve.” The statement was part of a
    sentiment focused on the idea of the nation’s people coming together.


    See now I never mentioned this in the debates that went on here because I could not find where it was on the internet but there was a point... ok let's call it a rumour because I still can't find it again... but he is rumoured to have said at some point in his campaign that ultimately he would like the native nations to no longer be soveriegn and wants to dissolve "outdated" treaties.

    Support him all you want... I'm seeing another typical politician coming to roost. The only change you're gonna see is the skin color of the bird in the nest.
    Last edited by Blackbear; 01-23-2009, 05:49 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blackbear
    replied
    ************************************************** ***********
    This Message is Reprinted Under the Fair Use
    Doctrine of International Copyright Law:
    _http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html_
    (US CODE: Title 17,107. Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use)
    ************************************************** ***********

    FROM: _http://www.indiancountrytoday.com/home/content/37903899.html_
    (Native Americans witness history | Indian Country Today | Content)
    Native Americans witness history
    Obama’s swearing-in captures hearts and minds
    By Rob Capriccioso

    Story Published: Jan 20, 2009

    Rob Capriccioso Indian Country
    A Native American artist created a work of art entitled "Barack Black Eagle:
    He Who Helps People Throughout the Land," which was displayed during the
    inaugural festivities. Obama was given the name by a Crow family who adopted him
    into the tribe when he visited the Crow Nation in May 2008.
    Story Updated: Jan 21, 2009
    WASHINGTON – Thousands of American Indians descended on Capital City to
    witness the historic inauguration of Barack Hussein Obama as the 44th President
    of the United States of America.

    In a speech after his swearing-in ceremony, Obama mentioned the economic
    hardships facing Americans today, as well as the ongoing war in Iraq.

    “The challenges we face are real, they are serious, and they are many. They
    will not be met easily, or in a short span of time, but know this, America:
    they will be met.”

    Obama did not specifically mention American Indians in his address. He did
    say that the time has come to recognize that “all are equal, all are free, and
    all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.”

    He later added: “…we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a
    weakness.”

    Upon winning the presidency in November, Obama mentioned American Indians in
    his acceptance speech, and he has said more than once that he believes there
    is a need to build a strong “nation-to-nation relationship” with tribes and
    Native people.

    Obama did mention tribes in his inaugural speech, but not specifically
    Indian tribes: “…we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday
    pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve.” The statement was part of a
    sentiment focused on the idea of the nation’s people coming together.

    Obama took the oath of office on the same Bible used by President Abraham
    Lincoln during his inauguration in 1861. The ceremony was presided over by
    Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts.

    Aretha Franklin sang “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee,” and a host of celebrities
    and top-ranking politicians, including all living former presidents and their
    wives, were in attendance.

    The spectacle surrounding the event captured the hearts and minds of Native
    leaders and tribal members. Several said they couldn’t have missed viewing
    the inauguration of the first African American president in the nation’s
    history.

    “It’s so exhilarating,” said LaDonna Harris, president of Americans for
    Indian Opportunity. She said she had long been planning to attend the event, and
    noted she was one of Obama’s early Native supporters.

    Harris, a former candidate for vice president under the Citizens Party
    banner in 1980 and the Comanche spouse of former Democratic Oklahoma Sen. Fred
    Harris, added: “We need change; the world is changing. … He’s a person of mixed
    heritage, and with his background, I really feel identification with him.”

    Former Republican Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell, a member of the Northern
    Cheyenne Nation, also shared a positive assessment.

    “It is an exciting time for the entire country and especially, I think, for
    Native Americans,” Nighthorse Campbell said at a pre-Inauguration Day pow wow.

    During the inauguration itself, many Native attendees tried to keep in touch
    with each other by cell phone and text messaging to share their thoughts.
    Given the large number of calls being made, some had trouble getting service.

    Frank LaMere, a member of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska and longtime
    organizer of the Democratic Party’s Native American caucus, tried many times to
    call friends and family to share his enthusiasm, but it was tough going.

    “When I finally got through, it was nice to be able to say this really
    happened,” said LaMere, a longtime Obama supporter. “We made it, and now we will
    see where this new era will take us.”

    Despite the big crowds and cold temperatures, the event was one of overall
    high spirits. Many began gathering in the wee hours of the morning of
    Inauguration Day in hopes of getting a good in-person view of the swearing-in
    ceremony, or via one of several Jumbotron screens brought in to project the ceremony.

    Some Native leaders viewed the festivities from the National Museum of the
    American Indian, which lies just a few hundred yards from the Capitol Building.

    More than two million revelers were estimated to be in attendance at the
    event. Overhead camera shots showed crowds overflowing the National Mall from
    the Lincoln Memorial to the footsteps of the Capitol Building.

    As visitors continued to pack the mall throughout the morning, Obama and his
    wife, Michelle, attended a religious service at St. John’s Church near the
    White House.

    They then had coffee with now former President George W. Bush and Mrs. Laura
    Bush, along with Vice President Joe Biden and his wife Mrs. Jill Biden, at
    the White House before heading to the Capitol for the official ceremony.

    After the swearing-in and Obama’s speech, Rev. Joseph Lowery gave the
    following benediction, which partially alluded to American Indians:

    “Lord, in the memory of all the saints who from their labors rest, and in
    the joy of a new beginning, we ask you to help us work for that day when black
    will not be asked to get in back, when brown can stick around. ... when the
    red man can get ahead, man; and when white will embrace what is right. That
    all those who do justice and love mercy, say amen. Say amen.”

    Leave a comment:


  • Kakeeya
    replied
    I knew this.......

    I saw the news when it happened and thought it was pretty cool. His new name is "One who helps the People" or something like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • rocks_az
    replied
    http://www.powwows.com/gathering/nat...ow-nation.html

    By Matthew Mosk
    The Washington Post - 19 May 2008
    Obama Adopted Into Crow Nation | The Trail | washingtonpost.com

    CROW AGENCY, Mont. -- Sen. Barack Obama became the first American presidential candidate to visit the reservation of the Crow Nation and in doing so was adopted into the nation under the Crow name "One Who Helps People Throughout the Land."

    Drums pounded and the crowd cheered as Obama was escorted to the podium by his "new parents," Hartford and Mary Black Eagle, in the manner of a groom being walked down the aisle. Obama beamed. His adoptive parents gave Obama hugs as he stepped onto a riser to speak.

    "I want to thank my new parents," he said. "The nicest parents you could ever want to know. I like my new name. Barack Black Eagle. That is a good name!"

    For all the symbolism -- members of the tribe wore colorful traditional clothing and feathered head-dresses -- Obama addressed some issues of serious concern not only to the 12,100-member Crow Nation but to many Native American tribes around the country.

    Obama told those gathered that he intended to acknowledge the "tragic history" of Native Americans over the past three centuries. They "never asked for much, only what was promised by the treaty obligations of their forebears," he said, promising to honor those treaties.

    Moreover, he pledged to bring sorely needed "quality affordable health care and a world-class education to reservations all across America. That will be a priority when I'm president."

    The visit was meaningful, said Darrin Old Coyote, a member of the tribe who wore an elaborate headdress. "To have us left out all these years, and then for him to come here, it shows respect, and it makes us optimistic," Old Coyote said.

    The visit also had political value for Obama. The members of the Crow Nation vote as "a close-knit bloc," Old Coyote said. "Now that Senator Obama is part of the family, that is where we will go."
    __________________

    "Be good, be kind, help each other."
    "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."
    --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

    Leave a comment:


  • legalstraight
    replied
    I think his name in Crow is something like "He who unites the people" you can pull it up on Indian Country Today- the article is from like August I think.

    Although I gotta say after he got sworn in I kept expect him to get up there and say "Alright you're stuck with me for four years so lets get radical"

    Leave a comment:


  • timmy tiger
    replied
    ^^^^The Real HEAD PERV^^^^

    Oh you so will not behave. You just don't have it in you to behave.LMAO

    Leave a comment:


  • soopashinaab
    replied
    ^^^ Head Pervert ^^^

    You're right TT... I'm sorry!! I'll behave now!

    Leave a comment:


  • timmy tiger
    replied
    Originally posted by soopashinaab View Post
    Ohhh... it's always you TT!!! LMAO

    It so is not.LMAO REad your signature, that's actually referring to me here. I'm totally innocent.LMAO

    Don't go there.LMAO

    Leave a comment:


  • soopashinaab
    replied
    Originally posted by timmy tiger View Post
    Oh okay, so it wasn't me this time.LOL So there's another one out there somewhere.
    Ohhh... it's always you TT!!! LMAO

    Leave a comment:


  • rocks_az
    replied
    I'll just go with his adoption rather than his lineage, its more believable to me. He's Crow! Woooo.... LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • timmy tiger
    replied
    Yeah, I had heard that one too. Something about a grandma or grandfather, something along those lines anyway.LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • Blackbear
    replied
    supposedly I heard he's part Cherokee... not joking.

    Leave a comment:


  • timmy tiger
    replied
    Oh okay, so it wasn't me this time.LOL So there's another one out there somewhere.

    Leave a comment:

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