Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Flutes Stolen

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Flutes Stolen

    Handcrafted flutes stolen
    Written by .



    APACHE, Okla. (AP) – The son of a renowned Native American artist is hoping a set of handcrafted flutes that were stolen from him are returned.

    Tim Tate Nevaquaya awoke Friday morning to find his home in Apache had been vandalized and five flutes he had placed in his vehicle gone.

    “When I found out they took these flutes, it’s just really upsetting,” Nevaquaya said. “They were really special instruments.”


    The stolen flutes include a distinctive white pine flute Nevaquaya and his wife made while on a trip to Florida, which he said “really means a lot to me.”


    Nevaquaya valued his four missing flutes at about $1,100 and one belonging to his brother, Calvert, at $1,000.


    “That was his pride and joy,” Nevaquaya said of the flute, which his brother played during concert performances. “That was something he never wanted to give up.”


    The Nevaquayas are two of the four sons of Doc Tate Nevaquaya, a Comanche flutist who is considered one of the great Native American artists of his generation. He was named an Oklahoma Treasure by the Governor’s Arts Award in 1995. Doc Nevaquaya died the following year.


    The brothers have carried on the flute-playing tradition and were slated to provide music for the Comanche Elders Day program in Lawton on Friday.


    They have gotten instruments to perform with, but there are certain subtleties in tone and texture that separate a concert-quality flute from a standard creation, Tim Nevaquaya said.


    He plans to start working on making new, performance-worthy flutes, but creating one takes “a good three days of labor,” Tim Nevaquaya said.


    After the initial carving of the wood, an intricate process of refinement and tuning occurs before a flute moves from a mere musical tool to an instrument of sonic beauty, he said.


    “It's a slow process to get a flute to its finest performance level,” Tim Nevaquaya said. “I just hope they will be returned.”

  • #2
    i find this very disheartening and pray to the great spirit that he helps these people find it in their hearts to return the flutes back to their rightful owners.

    Comment


    • #3
      Just FYI a young boy returned the flutes (youc an read more about it in todays Daily Oklahoman!)....these flutes belonged to my grandfather...the late...Doc Tate Nevaquaya...who is a very well known Comanche flute player/maker and artist here in Oklahoma. It made me cry to think someone would do that, but all we could do is pray! Then our prayers were answered and the flutes have been returned! I think I will put up a blog about him to let everyone a little more about him...Here are some pics of him doing what he loved...making flutes and then some info I pulled off a website about him....i'll put more in a blog so I dont' take up to much space on here....i could go on and on about him!!

      R.I.P. Grandpa and your baby girl loves you and still thinks about you all the time....




      Here is a little about the Great Man who I was so thankful to be able to call my Grandpa Doc...

      Comanche artist and flute player Doc Tate Nevaquaya (1932-1996) is credited with the rejuvenation of traditional Native American flute playing. When the original courting function of the Plains flute was no longer part of their everyday lives, this aspect of Native American oral tradition was in danger of dying out. Doc Tate recognized the need to resurrect the old songs, formerly handed down by example and imitation, before the flute players who knew the songs passed away. He took it upon himself to approach these players, earn their confidence, and learn their songs. He traveled to various museums, such as the Smithsonian Institution and the Library of Congress, to examine their flute collections and listen to tapes of flute melodies. Doc Tate dedicated himself to preserving traditional Native American Plains flute music, giving lecture-recitals to both Native American and non-Native American audiences. He inspired a whole generation of Native American musicians, including R. Carlos Nakai, Ed Wapp, Tom Ware, and Kevin Locke.



      Paula Conlon is writing Doc Tate Nevaquaya’s biography under contract with the University of Oklahoma Press. This research focuses on Doc Tate’s contributions from different people’s perspectives, based primarily on interviews with his family, friends and colleagues. It will examine the legacy that Doc Tate left behind, such as his teaching four of his sons to play and make flutes, all of whom now carry on their father’s mission by dedicating themselves to keeping the Native American flute tradition alive. The book also discusses the current transformation of the Native American flute from a private courtship ritual performed by young men to a more public expression of Native identity that no longer excludes female players.

      Oklahoma Flute Circle, first Friday of each month at Jacobson House Native Art Center, 609 Chautauqua Avenue at corner of Boyd, Norman, Oklahoma, 7-9 PM; for further information please contact Paula Conlon ([email protected])
      Last edited by cris_neva; 12-31-2008, 10:44 AM.
      Be strong, but not rude.
      Be kind, but not weak.
      Be bold, but don't bully.
      Be humble, but not shy.
      Be confident, but not arrogant.

      Lessons Learned In Life

      Comment


      • #4
        i am glad that they were returned...your grandpa sounds like he was a great man and his memory lives on in the music he helped keep alive and write himself..i have a nakai eaton clipman nawang cd that just mesmorises me.. is this the same nakai he inspired or another? just curious.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by rain_drop_smth View Post
          i am glad that they were returned...your grandpa sounds like he was a great man and his memory lives on in the music he helped keep alive and write himself..i have a nakai eaton clipman nawang cd that just mesmorises me.. is this the same nakai he inspired or another? just curious.
          Hmmmm...Not sure....I'll have to ask my pops or uncle's? And thank you....he was a very great man...I was his little baby girl....I loved him so much and still cry everytime I hear a flute play...even when we are in walmart and I hear those CD's they have by the candles...the ones were you can sample the music...If I hear that one of the native flutes cd playing...My heart just smiles, because I think of him! So thanks again!

          Have a Happy and Blessed New Years...Be Safe!!
          Last edited by cris_neva; 12-31-2008, 02:51 PM.
          Be strong, but not rude.
          Be kind, but not weak.
          Be bold, but don't bully.
          Be humble, but not shy.
          Be confident, but not arrogant.

          Lessons Learned In Life

          Comment

          Join the online community forum celebrating Native American Culture, Pow Wows, tribes, music, art, and history.

          Related Topics

          Collapse

          Trending

          Collapse

          There are no results that meet this criteria.

          Sidebar Ad

          Collapse
          Working...
          X