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Acorn Bread

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  • Acorn Bread

    Okay I know how to leech the acorns out, re-dry them, and grind them, but my grandma never taught me her recipe, my auntie won't part with hers (says it makes sure I come home every so often) And my wife has no clue how to make it,
    can someone take pity on a boy that's been relocated and give me a recipe? I am massively craving it.

  • #2
    Where I live we mostly have pin oaks and the nuts they bear are -really- tiny and a whole lot of work for not very much return. I found that Korean supermarkets carry acorn flour - so at least I can make some of the wonderful food I had as a kid.

    Dunno what kind of bread you're used to but here is the recipe I use:

    1 cup acorn meal
    1 cup flour
    2 tablespoons baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 egg
    1 cup milk
    3 tablespoons oil
    2-4 tablespoons maple syrup or honey

    Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees.

    Generously grease a loaf pan (you can also use a 9" by 9" pan, deep dish pie pan or any other kind of similarly sized baking pan, just adjust your cooking time accordingly).

    Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl. In a separate bowl - mix the egg, milk, and oil thoroughly.
    Pour the liquid mixture into the dry mixture and stir it with a fork just enough to moisten dry ingredients. The batter will be a bit lumpy (kind of like making cornbread or pancakes - stir too much and the bread will be tough).

    Cook for about 30 minutes or until a knife stick in the center comes out clean.

    You can add a handful of your favorite fresh or dried fruit, substitute 1/2 the milk with mashed bananas, use half fruit juice and half milk.... all are good.

    Basically you can substitute acorn flour for *up to* half of the regular flour in any baked goods recipe. If you swap out more than half of the regular flour - the result will be a dense crumbly mess because acorn flour is very high in protein (but low in the thing that holds baked goods together - namely gluten).

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