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Cinco de Mayo recipes

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  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Tortillas:

    a couple cups of flour
    a palmful of salt
    half a spoon baking powder

    Stir, then crumble in 1/2 cup shortening.
    Mix in about 1/2 to 1 cup water to make a soft dough.

    Knead for awhile then let it sit for at least 20 minutes. Separate and roll into a dozen golfball shapes. Roll each into a thin circle. I roll them as thin as possible, but you can go a little thicker - like 1/8".

    Fry in a dry cast iron skillet and flip after bubbled up...around a minute.

    Stack and cover with a dishcloth. After a couple hours wrap leftovers in plastic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Flying_Raven
    replied
    Originally posted by OLChemist View Post
    Elota!

    Corn on the cob with mayo, cheese, lime juice and powdered chile.

    There is a wagon outside the local grocery that sells these. Yummy!
    yeah thats what i mean i think they use the type of mayo with lime already in it

    i love it ^_^

    Leave a comment:


  • OLChemist
    replied
    Originally posted by Flying_Raven View Post
    i have no clue what it was called, but when i was younger at the local festival for cinco de mayo they had these corn on the cob that the basted with butter, coated with a thin layer of mayo, and then dusted with parika and garlic powder(in small amounts probably optional) it was nice, as a little kid i ate about 5 in one sitting
    Elota!

    Corn on the cob with mayo, cheese, lime juice and powdered chile.

    There is a wagon outside the local grocery that sells these. Yummy!

    Leave a comment:


  • Flying_Raven
    replied
    running abit late here

    i have no clue what it was called, but when i was younger at the local festival for cinco de mayo they had these corn on the cob that the basted with butter, coated with a thin layer of mayo, and then dusted with parika and garlic powder(in small amounts probably optional) it was nice, as a little kid i ate about 5 in one sitting

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Cream of Green Chile

    We just had this as a soup and it would have made a great sauce to put over a smothered burrito or pork chop.

    2 cups broth
    1 cup cream
    1 cup roasted green chilies
    optional seasonings: garlic, oregano, cilantro, salt, pepper, onion

    Boil the broth and chilies. Blend or process until smooth. Add the seasonings, seasoning on the strong side. Don't worry about the heat of the chiles, the cream will calm it down. Turn down the heat and add the cream. Taste and season to taste.

    To use as a sauce, simmer for 30 minutes and let sit.

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Good, simple, elegant. I've had that recipe for a while!!

    Anyway, I've gotten so many requests for my posole recipe, here it is.

    2 pounds of pork, with bones OR cubed boneless pork and some pork neckbones
    1 bag of frozen hominy (posole)
    4 california chile pods
    2 cloves garlic
    1 tablespoon season salt
    Optional: Any other spices you like to cook with - paprika, chili powder, onion powder, cumin - about a teaspoon each

    Cook the pork for 2 hours in 2-3 quarts of water. Strain, reserving the broth and cook the hominy in the broth for 2 hours adding more water as needed.

    Meanwhile separate the meat from the bones (shred the big pieces), and add the meat in with the hominy after the 2 hours and continue to simmer.

    Remove a cup or two of broth from the pan and place in a blender or food processor. Remove the stems from the dried chilis. (Optional, heat in a dry skillet for a few minutes to get a roasted flavor) Remove all the seeds for a medium posole. Leave in more seeds for a hotter posole. Place in the blender with the peeled garlic and blend away. It's kinda amazing how the mixture will turn from orange to a nice terra cotta color.

    Pour in with the posole and simmer for 1/2 hour more. Taste and add more salt as needed. Enjoy! Freezes well.

    If you're having trouble with the ingredients, just use canned hominy (4 small cans, a couple medium cans, or a gallon size can) and chili powder - whole bottle. Won't be the same, but close.

    This is a very good posole, but nowhere close to the posole served at the Pueblo Indian Center in Albuquerque which is the best I've ever seen.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zitkala
    replied
    Originally posted by Joe's Dad View Post
    Tequila, lemon and salt. That used to be my favorite Cinco De Mayo recipe!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Joe's Dad
    replied
    Tequila, lemon and salt. That used to be my favorite Cinco De Mayo recipe!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • OLChemist
    replied
    Dang it, Wyo-rose. You really like to torture me, LOL. Now, I'm going to have to stop at Montrey Market and pick up a pound of carnitas and some fresh corn tortillas.

    Leave a comment:


  • ugidali
    replied
    Pastel

    Mmmmm.
    Pastel de Tres Leches.
    I've made this many times.
    You're making me hungry

    I want to the Cinco de Mayo this past weekend.
    Mmm. Los tacos con cilantro, cebolla, y chile!
    Anyway, guess you don't need the recipe any more.
    But, hope you had fun.

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Texas Chili

    1 pound beef cut into 1/2 inch cubes
    1 can tomatoes
    4 chili pods, garlic cloves, cumin or can of enchilada sauce or chili powder
    1/2 onion diced
    2 tablespoons oil

    Brown the beef and onions in the oil. Add the canned tomatoes, breaking them apart.
    Add the can of enchilada sauce or 3 tablespoons chili powder.

    If using chili pods, break off the stem (leave some seeds for heat), and blend with garlic cloves in a cup of hot water. Add to pan.

    Add another cup of water as necessary and simmer for 2 hours.

    Makes a wonderful sauce for chili dogs, smothered burritos, whatever!!

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Green Chile and Cheese Flautas

    * 16 small flour tortillas
    * 1/2 cup canned green chiles (or roasted, peeled and seeded green chiles coarsely chopped)
    * 1 cup jack cheese
    * 1 cup sweet corn, frozen and thawed or canned
    * 1/2 cup green chile sauce
    * 1 teaspoon sugar

    Preparation:
    Mix chiles, cheese, chile sauce, corn and sugar in a medium bowl. Place about 2 tablespoons of filling down center of a tortilla and roll it up tightly. Secure with a toothpick and place seam side down on a plate. Roll up all of the flautas and fry 3 or 4 at a time in 350 degree hot oil until golden brown and crispy. Drain on paper towels and serve immediately.

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Enchilada sauce:

    4 pods dried California chili peppers
    1 can tomatoes
    2 cloves garlic
    1 cup broth
    additional water if too thick

    Blend or use a food processor on the chili pods (remove stems and seeds - leave some seeds if you want some heat), garlic, and broth until orange-red and thick. Then add the tomatoes and blend a bit.

    Heat it up and you have some WONDERFUL enchilada sauce. Sure beats even Old El Paso for flavor and price.

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Pork Carnitas

    Boil a big hunk of pork shoulder for 2 hours.
    Break into 2-3 inch chunks. Season with salt, pepper, and any other seasoning (garlic powder, chili powder, steak seasoning).
    Lay out on a sheet pan and bake for 30 min at 425 until the edges are crispy.
    Chop into small pieces and enjoy in a taco, burrito, or what have you!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Tatanka Sapa Win
    replied
    Title: Chile Verde/Basic Green Chili Sauce
    Yield: 1 Serving

    Ingredients

    2 tb oil
    1/2 sm onion; chopped
    1 lg garlic clove; chopped
    2 tb flour
    1/4 ts ground cumin
    1/4 ts black pepper
    1 1/2 c chicken broth
    1 c Anaheim or poblano chilies,
    -roasted; peeled
    OR
    1 c canned green chilies; (8
    -ounces) chopped
    1/4 ts oregano
    1/2 ts salt
    2 ts jalapenos (optional);
    -chopped

    Instructions

    Heat the oil in a 1 or 2 quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and
    garlic, cover and cook over low heat for about 5 minutes to wilt the
    onions. Check halfway through to make sure they are not browning. Raise the
    heat to medium again, stir in the flour, cumin and black pepper, and cook
    stirring, for 2 minutes to cook the rawness out of the flour. The onions
    will tend to ball up into clumps, but that does not matter. When the
    onion-flour mixture just begins to color, remove pan from heat and
    gradually pour in the broth, stiring constantly to prevent lumps. Add all
    the remaining ingredients. Return pan to heat and bring to the boiling
    point, then cover and simmer over low heat for 30 minutes stirring
    occasionally. The finished sauce should be thick enough to nap a spoon. The
    basic sauce is now ready to use or to store in the refrigerator. It keeps
    well for a week or so, but a skin will form on the cooled sauce, and when
    cold it will almost solidly congeal. All can be made right again by
    reheating the sauce as you need it. This chile verde is warming but not
    nearly so hot as almost every native New Mexican likes it. For a hotter
    sauce, add the optional chopped jalapenos at the same time as the mild
    chilies go in. The upper limit to how hot chile verde can be has yet to be
    determined, but I am nearly positive that no one is reputed to make their
    entirely with jalapenos.

    Leave a comment:

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