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Unusual, weird or gross food that your tribe loves???????

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  • Unusual, weird or gross food that your tribe loves???????

    Yesterday I found myself glued to the television watching one of my favorite shows..The Discovery Channel / National Geographic did a show on weird foods that people from different cultures enjoy eating and this was called Gross Grub. This show featured two different families from Alaska as well as people from other places around the world. The reason that they featured the Alaskan natives- I apoligize I can't remember exactly which tribes they were from- was because one woman & her family ate Stinkheads a dish made from the heads of salmon that are buried in the ground for two weeks then eaten & the other family was eating seal flippers that had been rotting for 3 months that they then essentially eat like bbq ribs after they have been boiled. So, I guess my question is this.....what weird, strange, gross or unusual food does your tribe enjoy eating? Also since I know we have some Alaskan natives on this website is this something that you have ever eaten?? Enjoy and have fun thinking of foods that others might think are gross!!!!

    OP1
    OrangePridendnds1
    "What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset."
    Crowfoot, Blackfoot warrior and orator
    ...... everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence.
    Mourning Dove Salish 1888-1936

  • #2
    Stinkheads Article

    Here is the article on the stinkheads: I thought this was a good show and also for teh record I thought it showed the natives families both in a very positive light..it wasn't about ooohhh your weird but about the different foods that people from different cultures enjoy... This is a long article so I am going to have to pot it in two parts....sorry!!

    Alaskan Dilemma: Native Food Preparation Fosters Botulism
    by Marian Segal

    Cultural traditions die hard. Passed on from generation to generation, they are a source of pride and enjoyment, often serving to identify and bind the members of the group. But sometimes these customs can be dangerous, even deadly.

    This is the case with the ways Alaskan Natives prepare certain traditional foods. Some of these methods of preparation foster botulism.

    Alaskan Natives suffer the highest incidence of botulism in the world, says Jeffery Rhodehamel, research microbiologist with FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.

    Several government agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration, are working with Alaskan Natives to educate them about the dangers and lessen the threat of this disease.

    "The reason for the high rate of botulism among Alaskan Natives," says Rhodehamel, "is that their traditional ethnic foods involve some risk. Most are home-processed fish or sea mammals--whale blubber [fat], seal flippers, or seal blubber--and the methods of preparation foster contamination and growth of Clostridium botulinum. These bacteria produce the deadly botulinal toxin that causes the disease.

    "Botulism is not new to Alaska. In the early 1900s, explorers and whalers noted that whole families of Natives would be wiped out, with the deaths attributed to ptomaine poisoning. Others later suspected trichinosis to be the cause. It wasn't until the mid-20th century that the Canadian scientist Claude E. Dolman, in a 1960 article in the journal Arctic, postulated botulism as the probable cause, based on the food practices of certain Native populations. In the last 30 years, laboratory methods have confirmed many of the more recent outbreaks as botulism.

    Nerve Symptoms
    The disease affects nerve transmission, causing weakness and paralysis, and possibly death. Symptoms come on abruptly, usually from 18 to 36 hours after ingestion of the botulinal toxin, and may progress rapidly over several days.

    The toxin binds to nerve endings and prevents release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which transfers messages to the next nerve. With transmission of nerve impulses blocked, weakness and paralysis result.

    "It tends to attack the cranial nerves first," says Rhodehamel, "followed by a descending, symmetrical paralysis. The eyelids droop, there is difficulty swallowing and dry mouth, vertigo, dizziness, lassitude. It moves down, and the limbs become paralyzed. Once the muscles of the chest and diaphragm are involved, respiration is inhibited. Respiratory failure and pneumonia are the greatest threat to life.

    "Nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea may precede the neurological symptoms.
    Treatment is with antitoxin developed from horse serum. The quicker antitoxin is administered, the sooner the progression of the disease can be halted. This is because the antitoxin destroys only the free circulating botulinal toxin; it has no effect on toxin already bound to nerve endings.

    Recovery is a slow process because it generally takes months for nerves to regenerate. Weakness may persist for as long as a year after onset of the disease
    OrangePridendnds1
    "What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset."
    Crowfoot, Blackfoot warrior and orator
    ...... everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence.
    Mourning Dove Salish 1888-1936

    Comment


    • #3
      Stinkheads Part II

      Growing Problem
      Since 1966, the yearly incidence of botulism in Alaska has increased from 1.2 cases per 100,000 population to 15.2 cases per 100,000, according to a 1988 report in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. In fact, the problem has become so acute that the national Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta now stocks its Arctic Research Station with botulism antitoxin. Normally, the antitoxin has to be requested and distributed directly from the agency in Atlanta.

      Several factors contribute to the high incidence of botulism among Native Alaskans:- Spores of Clostridium botulinum bacteria are ubiquitous in Alaska, especially in the western and southeastern beaches and coastal areas.

      - The spores have also been found in the gills of fish and in the entrails of fish and sea mammals, which make up a large portion of the Native Alaskan diet.

      - The traditional methods of preparing and storing these seafoods promote C. botulinum contamination and growth. The animals are often slaughtered on the beach or on ground where contact with bacteria from the soil or viscera is unavoidable. The food is then placed in a cool, shaded, shallow pit in the ground lined with wood, animal skins, or leaves. It is covered with moss or leaves and left to "ferment" for a month or two.

      "Actually, it's not a true fermentation," explains Rhodehamel, "because there are no carbohydrates or sugars that are fermenting. Generally, in fermentation with carbohydrates, acid is produced, which would inhibit growth of the bacteria.

      "The foods prepared this way, however, consist of fats and proteins, basically decomposing. Botulism outbreaks associated with fermented fish heads (called "stinkheads") and fish eggs ("stink eggs") occur in the summer, while outbreaks associated with fermented whale ("muktuk"), beaver tail ("stinky tail"), and seal flipper occur throughout the year, reports Nathan Shaffer, M.D., and colleagues in a recent article in the Western Journal of Medicine.

      Despite the expectation that outbreaks would decrease with increasing education campaigns, the annual number of outbreaks has remained relatively constant since the 1970s, Shaffer reports, and recent outbreaks in Alaska have occurred in previously unaffected regions. (All outbreaks of botulism in Alaska reported since 1970 have been investigated by the state's Division of Public Health or CDC's Arctic Investigations Laboratory, and all hospitalized patients have been examined by a physician from one or the other agency.

      Technology Complicates Situation
      Ironically, modern technology has added to the problem rather than alleviated it because of the introduction of new implements. Native Americans are increasingly using plastic bags to line the pits and enclose the food, promoting the anaerobic conditions (absence of oxygen) necessary for growth of C. botulinum and subsequent production of the toxin responsible for the illness.

      Plastic buckets and glass jars also complicate the problem. The food may be put in plastic buckets with the lids snapped tightly shut, providing an anaerobic environment, and then left to ferment above ground. The warmer, above-ground temperatures foster growth of the bacteria. Or the food is put in a glass jar and kept in the house next to the stove at about 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit), an almost optimum temperature for C. botulinum growth. Prepared this way, the food is ready in about a week, and has been dubbed traditional "fast food" by some government investigators.

      A review of botulism outbreaks in Alaska from 1947 to 1985 published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases in June 1988 reported that all 59 confirmed or suspected outbreaks during that period occurred in Alaskan Natives and were associated with eating traditional Alaskan Native foods.

      "The traditional methods of preparation might well have served originally to provide essential nutrients lacking in the diet," says Miriam Lancaster, a nurse with the Alaskan Native Health Service in Anchorage. "The fermentation process softens fish bones so they are edible," she explains, "providing a usable source of calcium, a nutrient that has not been readily available in the diets of Alaskan Natives. Also, fermenting foods may release vitamin B.

      "Strong Tradition
      Past efforts at preventing botulism by educating Native Alaskans about the dangers inherent in traditional food preparation have been largely ineffective. They were "viewed as outsiders interfering with their culture," says Rhodehamel. "This is part of what sets them apart as Native Alaskans, and it's a source of pride," he says.

      Suggestions to modify the recipes by adding sugar to allow a true fermentation, and thereby afford some protection, or to heat the foods to destroy the botulinal toxin produced by the bacteria were also met with great resistance. In short, as Dolman wrote as early as 1960, "The proposed violation of time-honored recipes may be rejected by these Natives because the desired flavour will be lost; it may be scorned in defiance of the white man's encroachments and paternalism; or ignored when fuel is scarce, time short, and hunger rampant.

      "The experts agree that the prospect of Native Alaskans abandoning their traditional foods is unlikely. "There are even reports in the literature of cases of Natives who have gotten botulism and continue to eat these foods," says Rhodehamel. "Also, the younger generation picks up on the traditional foods. Even though today's kids are exposed to Western foods and McDonald's, many of them have tried [traditional foods] and intend to eat them when they're older.

      "Acknowledging this, public health officials agree that the most practical approaches to alleviate the threat of botulism are to try to lessen, as much as possible, the risk posed by traditional foods and to promote prompt treatment once botulism is contracted. FDA, CDC, Alaska's Division of Public Health, and Canada Health and Welfare are working to develop a campaign urging Alaskan Natives to:- Return to the original methods of slow, cold temperature fermentation and not use plastic bags and other containers that foster an anaerobic environment. Although there are risks inherent in traditional foods, incorporating the use of these devices increases the risks.

      - Know the signs and symptoms of botulism and seek medical attention immediately if any develop.

      For health officials, the message is to suspect botulism and treat it promptly. The disease is often mistaken for something else, such as stroke or drunkenness.

      "There was a report once that a Russian immigrant came to an emergency room dizzy, stumbling, with dry mouth and slurred speech. And of course he had difficulty with English. They couldn't figure out what was wrong and sent him home to sober up, only to have him come back a couple hours later in far worse condition.

      "Generally, a medical doctor may never see a case of botulism in a lifetime," says Rhodehamel. "The problem is it's not often recognized because it's so seldom seen and, in terms of treatment, early recognition and prompt administration of antitoxin is critical. "Therefore, health officials going to Alaska are warned that it is a high-incidence area for botulism, and they are taught the signs and symptoms of the disease.
      Giving up fermented fish heads and seal flippers may seem to many people a simple sacrifice to prevent botulism, but, as Rhodehamel points out, "The Alaskan Natives might look at yogurt and say, 'Well, that's nothing but spoiled, curdled milk,' so it's all a matter of cultural preference."

      Marian Segal is a member of FDA's public affairs staff.
      OrangePridendnds1
      "What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset."
      Crowfoot, Blackfoot warrior and orator
      ...... everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence.
      Mourning Dove Salish 1888-1936

      Comment


      • #4
        Well once upon a time we enjoyed "enemy soup". LOL
        Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Stinkheads Part III

          Botulism in the United States
          Home-canned and home-preserved foods are the most common cause of botulism in the United States. The problem of botulism in commercial canning in the early 20th century was virtually eliminated after a series of studies defined the habitat of the Clostridium botulinum bacteria responsible for the disease, the foods incriminated, and the conditions that would destroy C. botulinum spores.
          The largest outbreaks ever reported in the United States were one in Pontiac, Mich., in 1977, when 59 people developed the illness after eating home-canned peppers in a restaurant, and another in Clovis, N.M., in 1978, when 32 people became ill with botulism after eating potato salad at a country club.

          There are seven strains of C. botulinum, designated A though G. Types A, B, E, and F are responsible for most cases of botulism in humans. The bacteria can also be grouped into proteolytic and non-proteolytic categories. The proteolytic types have enzymes that break down proteins in food, releasing compounds such as putrescine and cadaverine that produce offensive odors, providing a warning that something is wrong. Non-proteolytic types, on the other hand, don't have these enzymes. They can grow in a food and make it toxic with no signs of spoilage, either in appearance or taste.

          Although botulism is not a common food-borne disease in the United States apart from Alaska, still roughly 5 to 10 outbreaks occur each year, says Jeffery Rhodehamel, research microbiologist with FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.

          "Most outbreaks are from improperly home-processed foods-- either home canning or other home processing," he says. "Commercial outbreaks occur less often, but when they do, they usually involve a number of people and are more spectacular.

          "C. botulinum bacteria grow under anaerobic conditions--that is, in an environment without oxygen, such as in canned food or other vacuum-packed products. Though a relatively anaerobic environment and temperatures above 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit) are optimal for production of botulinum toxin, strict anaerobic conditions are not necessary, and toxin production by some type E strains has occurred at temperatures as low as 3.3 C (38 F).

          Low-acid canned foods are historically associated with botulism. Recent outbreaks, however, have involved foods not usually associated with botulism, such as improperly prepared sauteed onions, potato salad, and commercial garlic-in-oil.

          "These outbreaks emphasize the need for continued vigilance both by consumers and by regulatory agencies," Rhodehamel says. He advises consumers to be aware that swollen or badly dented cans have a greater potential for contamination. A severe dent may stress the metal and make a pinhole through which the bacteria may enter.

          Regarding home-processing, Rhodehamel says that freezing inhibits the growth of C. botulinum. "If you vacuum-pack a product and spores are present, they may be able to grow, but if you freeze it, they won't grow, and if you thaw the product under refrigeration and cook it, there's no danger. Boiling the product for 10 minutes or other equivalent cooking will destroy any toxin that may have formed," he says.

          --M.S.
          OrangePridendnds1
          "What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset."
          Crowfoot, Blackfoot warrior and orator
          ...... everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence.
          Mourning Dove Salish 1888-1936

          Comment


          • #6
            Sheep intestine! sounds gross.. but isssssss YUMMY! *L
            ~* Im so sin-seriuos *~Impossible is NOT a fact, its an oppinion ... Rumble young girl RUMBLE!*~--

            Comment


            • #7
              Seal Flippers Information...

              Aleut food customs

              Since the fur seal is the most common animal on the Pribilofs, many ways have been developed for preparing its meat. During the summer sealing season, any of the meat may be taken by those who want it. Some is frozen to be used during the winter.

              The meat is used for roasts, soups, stews, ground for hamburger, meatballs, meatloaf, piruugax. The liver and heart are also utilized. The liver is especially good and tastes better than the finest calves liver.

              Besides these ways of preparing meat, other methods of preserving it without refrigeration have been devised through the years. the flippers are salted in barrels and stored for several months. They are also made into 'studen' (headcheese). The oil is relished by most of the adult population. The meat is also pickled, similar to pig's feet.

              Many years ago the intestines of the animals were cleaned and filled with meat and used as sausage. The stomachs were prepared in this way also. Present day Aleuts still use the meat for many of these dishes. The hair seal is available for hunting during the year round as well as the sea lion. These animals are used extensively and are prepared similar to the fur seal meat.

              The Aleuts as with other native peoples, are great meat eaters. They have devised all sorts of stews and chowder making use of any type of meat, or vegetables they have on hand.

              Aleut culture has been lost, their language and their foods are all that is left of their heritage since the Aleut people on St. Paul Island were brought to the Island from the Aleutians by the early Russian fur seekers.

              It is hoped that through this page some of the heritage of the Aleut People might be preserved. If you find a recipe that you would add, please contact us.

              Here some recipes:

              Lusta (Salted or fermented Fur seal Flipper)
              Seal Liver and heart
              Piruugax (Fish Pie)
              Berry pie
              Taho




              LUSTA (Salted or fermented Fur seal Flipper)

              The lusta is usually prepared in the summertime whe the fur seals are killed. It is prepared washing seal flippers in plain water and placing them in a barrel or container with salt between layers and then storaged for about three months.

              It is commonly served with bolied potatoes and bread or boiled seal meat. Some of the younger generation do not like this dish, older Aleuts relish it.
              OrangePridendnds1
              "What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset."
              Crowfoot, Blackfoot warrior and orator
              ...... everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence.
              Mourning Dove Salish 1888-1936

              Comment


              • #8
                Err..



                *Kalilsha*



                If the sun refused to shine, I would still be loving u
                When mountains crumble to the sea, there will still be u an me..

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'll thats so nasty....!
                  blah blah blah....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    kamikazie yazzie:
                    Sheep intestine! sounds gross.. but isssssss YUMMY! *L

                    Your right..doesn't really sound all that appetizing so I'mm gonna take your word on this one..lol....Just for fun what or how does one cook sheep intestines?

                    Aren't chitlins the stomach and intrails of a pig??? I can't remember....


                    Katezninen:
                    I'll thats so nasty....!

                    Which one??? LOL I'm not sure I could stomach any of those foods listed above...but I can be really picky when I want to..lol

                    Hey Blackbear!! Can I get that recipe???? LOL
                    OrangePridendnds1
                    "What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset."
                    Crowfoot, Blackfoot warrior and orator
                    ...... everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence.
                    Mourning Dove Salish 1888-1936

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Internal organs are yummy when fried.............yeah it does sound gross, but all us natives have tried some type of organ. Blood sausage, what else? come on, Jahns. menudo cooked with stomach lining..........liver.............brains.......... all this with hot tortilla and sauteed corn and squash..............my mouth is watering now.
                      Fall down 7 times, get up 8. MY FAMOUS WORDS.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Can't wait for the Navajo Nation fair now, all them grandma's cooking up a storm! LMAO!
                        Fall down 7 times, get up 8. MY FAMOUS WORDS.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yeah.. don't knock it till you try it! Seal tastes really good!!
                          Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Any tribes out there eat bugs?
                            Fall down 7 times, get up 8. MY FAMOUS WORDS.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              where i'm from we gather up this moss that grows out on forest trees and then you boil it down until it looks like mud (which you have to keep stirring and it takes forever) and then once its a big vat of brown, you eat it. it doesnt have a taste really but it has the consistency of yogurt or poi or something. its not really gross just a little funky.

                              i liked that "....all this with a hot tortilla"

                              Comment

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