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July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

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  • July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

    July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

    July 1969. It's a little over eight years since the flights of Gagarin and Shepard, followed quickly by President Kennedy's challenge to put a man on the moon before the decade is out.

    It is only seven months since NASA's made a bold decision to send Apollo 8 all the way to the moon on the first manned flight of the massive Saturn V rocket.

    Now, on the morning of July 16, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins sit atop another Saturn V at Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. The three-stage 363-foot rocket will use its 7.5 million pounds of thrust to propel them into space and into history.

    NASA - July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind



    Who remembers what they were doing that day?

    I just came home from being out all day and turned on this transister radio and heard the news at 6:30 in the evening! The landing just took place several minutes earlier and it was a moment I've never forgotten.

  • #2
    I remember someone calling my mom on our party line phone and she called me inside, turned on our B&W set with 1 channel via rabbit ears, and we watched when they did the first moon walk.

    Then I ran outside to keep playing.

    These conspiracy theories keep haunting me now tho.
    ...it is what it is...

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    • #3
      landing....



      I'd like to one day visit the place where all that was filmed...I don't think I'd have to travel to the moon...probably just a little ways down the road from Gathering LOL
      I think everyone on this rez is addicted to Harry Potter...lol...

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      • #4
        I remember it quite well. I had just graduated high school in May, I was working as a stock clerk/bagger in the local Kroger store. I watched the night before really glued to what I was seeing, and stayed up late to keep watching, had to get up at 4am the next day, that's when we recieved trucks in to stock. I remember being really tired, but couldn't wait to get home to see what else was being broadcast that evening. It was big stuff for me, the film 2001 A Space Odyssey had just come out the year before, and here we were living it. I'll always remember that, just as much as when Kennedy was shot. The first time I ever remember a tv in school was at the start of the space program, with Alan Shepard the second person to go in space and the first American.
        Last edited by streamhawk; 07-17-2009, 02:06 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ta'neeszahnii Techno View Post
          July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

          July 1969. It's a little over eight years since the flights of Gagarin and Shepard, followed quickly by President Kennedy's challenge to put a man on the moon before the decade is out.

          It is only seven months since NASA's made a bold decision to send Apollo 8 all the way to the moon on the first manned flight of the massive Saturn V rocket.

          Now, on the morning of July 16, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins sit atop another Saturn V at Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. The three-stage 363-foot rocket will use its 7.5 million pounds of thrust to propel them into space and into history.

          NASA - July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind



          Who remembers what they were doing that day?

          I just came home from being out all day and turned on this transister radio and heard the news at 6:30 in the evening! The landing just took place several minutes earlier and it was a moment I've never forgotten.
          We live in Kayenta then but was in oklahoma on summer vacation
          I remember it well followed the whole thing on TV, I was so into the space program then I had built models of the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo capsules!
          ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
          Till I Die!

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          • #6
            did somebody say 69? lol i dont remember cause i wasnt born yet. my days were the shuttle days. i remember our white science teacher being fired up about the launch and us watchin it in the library.. annnd the lonng, lonng walk back to the classroom after it blew up. i wish a sarcastic comedian could put this into perspective. haha cause it didnt turn out like he planned and he didnt really know what to do with us rez kids.. so it was jus like, business as usual ahaha
            thanks dad for showing me the way, teaching me the language, and not leaving my mother...*L*

            *RoUg3 MoD sTaTuS*

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            • #7
              I was VERY young, but I remember it well.

              I was too young to really care about the moon landing. All I knew was that it pre-empted Uncle Zeb's Cartoon Camp. Boy, was I p****d!

              sigpic

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              • #8
                geez, i was like 7 or 8 months old so i was probably taking a nap LOL, but didnt they lose the original video of them landing on the moon??? thats what i heard on the radio.............

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                • #9
                  I was four, so mostly I remember Mom and Dad talking about it. But, I remember later landings. During Apollo 17, I made a "rock collector" out of tinker toys and a sandwich bag so I could play astronaut, LOL.

                  Sometimes we forget how big an effect the space program has had on our lives. Apollo 8's "big blue marble" picture of the earth from lunar orbit changed the zeitgeist of this country. People finally saw our world as a tiny, fragile thing so alone in a hostile environment. It irrevocably altered the dominant culture attitude to the earth.

                  We live in a world changed by the huge return in technology from space (and defense) research. The Apollo guidance computer was the world's first embedded computer controller (all 4K of its wire-wrapped RTL chips and < 5K of memory). Embedded controllers are now ubiquitous. You interact with dozens on a daily basis. Where would we all be without our cell-phones, weather satellites, insulin pumps, velcro, bolometers, vacuum packaging, fuel cells, CNC machining, Nomex, and on and on.... It is estimated that every dollar spent on space research has an 8-fold return in new jobs and technology. It is hard to find other government program that have as high a return.

                  Is Space Exploration Worth the Cost? A Freakonomics Quorum - Freakonomics Blog - NYTimes.com

                  NASA Spinoff homepage

                  CNN - From pacemakers to braces, the medical benefits of space exploration - November 2, 1998

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                  • #10
                    I was dumbstruck when I read that NASA had blithely taped over all the footage! Thank God for TV!

                    The following editorial was in the paper this morning. I don't often agree with Mr. Krauthammer, but on this he's right on.


                    The Moon We Left Behind

                    By Charles Krauthammer
                    Friday, July 17, 2009

                    Michael Crichton once wrote that if you told a physicist in 1899 that within a hundred years humankind would, among other wonders (nukes, commercial airlines), "travel to the moon, and then lose interest . . . the physicist would almost certainly pronounce you mad." In 2000, I quoted these lines expressing Crichton's incredulity at America's abandonment of the moon. It is now 2009 and the moon recedes ever further.

                    Next week marks the 40th anniversary of the first moon landing. We say we will return in 2020. But that promise was made by a previous president, and this president has defined himself as the antimatter to George Bush. Moreover, for all of Barack Obama's Kennedyesque qualities, he has expressed none of Kennedy's enthusiasm for human space exploration.

                    So with the Apollo moon program long gone, and with Constellation, its supposed successor, still little more than a hope, we remain in retreat from space. Astonishing. After countless millennia of gazing and dreaming, we finally got off the ground at Kitty Hawk in 1903. Within 66 years, a nanosecond in human history, we'd landed on the moon. Then five more landings, 10 more moonwalkers and, in the decades since, nothing.

                    To be more precise: almost 40 years spent in low Earth orbit studying, well, zero-G nausea and sundry cosmic mysteries. We've done it with the most beautiful, intricate, complicated -- and ultimately, hopelessly impractical -- machine ever built by man: the space shuttle. We turned this magnificent bird into a truck for hauling goods and people to a tinkertoy we call the international space station, itself created in a fit of post-Cold War internationalist absentmindedness as a place where people of differing nationality can sing "Kumbaya" while weightless.


                    The shuttle is now too dangerous, too fragile and too expensive. Seven more flights and then it is retired, going -- like the Spruce Goose and the Concorde -- into the Museum of Things Too Beautiful and Complicated to Survive.

                    America's manned space program is in shambles. Fourteen months from today, for the first time since 1962, the United States will be incapable not just of sending a man to the moon but of sending anyone into Earth orbit. We'll be totally grounded. We'll have to beg a ride from the Russians or perhaps even the Chinese.

                    So what, you say? Don't we have problems here on Earth? Oh, please. Poverty and disease and social ills will always be with us. If we'd waited for them to be rectified before venturing out, we'd still be living in caves.

                    Yes, we have a financial crisis. No one's asking for a crash Manhattan Project. All we need is sufficient funding from the hundreds of billions being showered from Washington -- "stimulus" monies that, unlike Eisenhower's interstate highway system or Kennedy's Apollo program, will leave behind not a trace on our country or our consciousness -- to build Constellation and get us back to Earth orbit and the moon a half-century after the original landing.

                    Why do it? It's not for practicality. We didn't go to the moon to spin off cooling suits and freeze-dried fruit. Any technological return is a bonus, not a reason. We go for the wonder and glory of it. Or, to put it less grandly, for its immense possibilities. We choose to do such things, said JFK, "not because they are easy, but because they are hard." And when you do such magnificently hard things -- send sailing a Ferdinand Magellan or a Neil Armstrong -- you open new human possibility in ways utterly unpredictable.

                    The greatest example? Who could have predicted that the moon voyages would create the most potent impetus to -- and symbol of -- environmental consciousness here on Earth: Earthrise, the now iconic Blue Planet photograph brought back by Apollo 8?

                    Ironically, that new consciousness about the uniqueness and fragility of Earth focused contemporary imagination away from space and back to Earth. We are now deep into that hyper-terrestrial phase, the age of iPod and Facebook, of social networking and eco-consciousness.

                    But look up from your BlackBerry one night. That is the moon. On it are exactly 12 sets of human footprints -- untouched, unchanged, abandoned. For the first time in history, the moon is not just a mystery and a muse, but a nightly rebuke. A vigorous young president once summoned us to this new frontier, calling the voyage "the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked." And so we did it. We came. We saw. Then we retreated.

                    How could we?
                    sigpic

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                    • #11
                      I was thirteen years old, old enough to be interested in something that was obviously an important historical event. I sat in front of my parent's TV set, watching it all.
                      Last edited by neling4; 07-18-2009, 02:06 PM.

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                      • #12
                        I remember my Mom telling me to watch this, it is history in the making.. I was 10...

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                        • #13
                          I remember watching this on tv. I also remember it was kind of fuzzy.. Can't remember if I was just waking up...or something. Those late 60's were kinda rugged!!!


                          Why must I feel like that..why must I chase the cat?


                          "When I was young man I did some dumb things and the elders would talk to me. Sometimes I listened. Time went by and as I looked around...I was the elder".

                          Mr. Rossie Freeman

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                          • #14
                            40 Years ago today....Has it been that long?

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                            • #15
                              Just in time for the solar eclipse too!

                              MUMBAI (AFP) – Indian astrologers are predicting violence and turmoil across the world as a result of this week's total solar eclipse, which the superstitious and religious view as a sign of potential doom.

                              But astronomers, scientists and secularists are trying to play down claims of evil portent in connection with Wednesday's natural spectacle, when the moon will come between the Earth and the sun, completely obscuring the sun.

                              In Hindu mythology, the two demons Rahu and Ketu are said to "swallow" the sun during eclipses, snuffing out its life-giving light and causing food to become inedible and water undrinkable.

                              Pregnant women are advised to stay indoors to prevent their babies developing birth defects, while prayers, fasting and ritual bathing, particularly in holy rivers, are encouraged.

                              Solar eclipse pits superstition against science - Yahoo! News

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