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  • ... and that's a fact!!

    There is one strand of corn silk for each kernel on an ear of corn.

  • #2
    Corn has silk on it?!??!
    "Out greatest fear is not that we are inadequate, our greatest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light not our darkness that most frightens us."

    "Never Compromise yourself, Your all you've got"


    "An eye for an eye will only lead to a blind world."

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    • #3
      Really???

      If I ever manage to have a fresh ear of corn and a supernormal amount of patience at the same time, I'm going to test that!

      Comment


      • #4
        The use of herbal remedies, including corn silk (also known as maize silk), classified as Zea mays, are popular as an alternative to standard Western allopathic medicine for a variety of problems, including prostate disorders, a diuretic as well as for bedwetting and obesity.



        It also benefits:

        diuretic
        bladder and kidney problems
        edema (water retention)
        obesity
        prostate disorders
        bed-wetting
        carpal tunnel syndrome
        PMS
        reducing stone formation in kidneys
        clear boils

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Ta'neeszahnii Techno View Post
          There is one strand of corn silk for each kernel on an ear of corn.
          do they work like pull strings that in flate the kernals? lol
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          • #6
            Originally posted by ndnsooner View Post
            do they work like pull strings that in flate the kernals? lol
            ... more like a block party

            Many commonly grown vegetables are self-pollinating (tomatoes) or rely on insects (cucumbers), but corn is wind-pollinated.

            The male flowers that shed the pollen are located at the top of the plant in the tassel. The female flowers are arranged in rows along the cob, enclosed by the shucks. A silk is connected to each of the female flowers, and the other end of each silk hangs outside the shuck.

            At least one pollen grain must land on each silk to pollinate a female flower, which produces one kernel of corn. Each kernel of corn is the result of a separate act of pollination. So, it is important to plant corn so that the wind deposits the pollen on the silks.

            For that reason, corn plants should be arranged in several short rows side by side, rather than one or two long rows. By planting in blocks, you allow the pollen to move from one plant to another more surely, no matter which way the wind is blowing. Poorly filled-out ears are generally the result of poor pollination.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ta'neeszahnii Techno View Post
              ... more like a block party

              Many commonly grown vegetables are self-pollinating (tomatoes) or rely on insects (cucumbers), but corn is wind-pollinated.

              The male flowers that shed the pollen are located at the top of the plant in the tassel. The female flowers are arranged in rows along the cob, enclosed by the shucks. A silk is connected to each of the female flowers, and the other end of each silk hangs outside the shuck.

              At least one pollen grain must land on each silk to pollinate a female flower, which produces one kernel of corn. Each kernel of corn is the result of a separate act of pollination. So, it is important to plant corn so that the wind deposits the pollen on the silks.

              For that reason, corn plants should be arranged in several short rows side by side, rather than one or two long rows. By planting in blocks, you allow the pollen to move from one plant to another more surely, no matter which way the wind is blowing. Poorly filled-out ears are generally the result of poor pollination.
              I was just going to say this about the many rows
              don't you be wastin' all your money
              on syrup and honey because i'm sweet enough





              Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love truly, Laugh uncontrollably, And never regret anything that made you smile.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Ginger View Post
                I was just going to say this about the many rows

                Only a true corn-husker from Nebraska would know about that, eh?

                Now, why do u have corn rows in your hair?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Some varieties of corn are extra-sweet. They contain more sugar than normal sweet corn and are able to hold their sugar levels longer after harvest. Based on the genetics involved, they are grouped into two categories -- supersweet and sugary enhanced.

                  Recommended supersweet types (which must be isolated from cross-pollination with ordinary sweet corn or sugary enhanced) include Prime Plus Y, Promise Y, How Sweet It Is (AAS), Honey-N-Pearl (AAS), Summer Sweet No. 8101W, No. 7210Y, No. 7640Y, No. 781W, No. 7630Y, No. 7710Y, No. 8100Y, No. 8102BC and Pegasus.

                  Sugary enhanced types recommended include Honey Select (AAS), Accord, Miracle, Argent, Merlin, Summer Flavor, No. 79BC bi-color, No. 81W, Incredible, Bodacious, DelectableBC, Precious Gem BC, AmbrosiaBC and Calico BelleBC.

                  ("AAS" means the cultivar was named a winner by All-America Selections, the plant-testing organization.)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ta'neeszahnii Techno View Post
                    The use of herbal remedies, including corn silk (also known as maize silk), classified as Zea mays, are popular as an alternative to standard Western allopathic medicine for a variety of problems, including prostate disorders, a diuretic as well as for bedwetting and obesity.



                    It also benefits:

                    diuretic
                    bladder and kidney problems
                    edema (water retention)
                    obesity
                    prostate disorders
                    bed-wetting
                    carpal tunnel syndrome
                    PMS
                    reducing stone formation in kidneys
                    clear boils


                    ummm, I dont get it. U just EAT that silk stuff and its all good? or whatchu do wit it?
                    "Out greatest fear is not that we are inadequate, our greatest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light not our darkness that most frightens us."

                    "Never Compromise yourself, Your all you've got"


                    "An eye for an eye will only lead to a blind world."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dat1NdnGuy View Post
                      ummm, I dont get it. U just EAT that silk stuff and its all good? or whatchu do wit it?
                      Cornsilk is best used when fresh, but it is also available in dried form. Cornsilk can be collected from the female flower or from corn cobs. In addition, cornsilk is available commercially in powdered and capsule form and as an extract. Cornsilk is usually brewed as a tea, a beverage that is very soothing.

                      Cornsilk tea or infusion can be made by pouring 1 cup of boiling water over 2 teaspoons of dried cornsilk. The mixture is covered and steeped for 10–15 minutes. The tea should be consumed three times daily.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dat1NdnGuy View Post
                        ummm, I dont get it. U just EAT that silk stuff and its all good? or whatchu do wit it?
                        You make a tea out of it through infusion
                        infusion can be obtained through soaking
                        You can also dry the silk & grind it & make pills from the silk.
                        Last edited by Ginger; 09-02-2009, 09:17 PM.
                        don't you be wastin' all your money
                        on syrup and honey because i'm sweet enough





                        Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love truly, Laugh uncontrollably, And never regret anything that made you smile.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          We use corn husk for weaving cornhusk bags and patlapas (women's woven hats), very intricate and beautiful weaving. Wish I had some pics to post.

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                          • #14
                            They are also perfect for rolling tobacco in.

                            Ever since I realized it, my dad has been working the corn fields even in the off season. But I remember going out there in the early mornings with a hoe to get rid of any weeds that tried to grow in the fields. When the tassels were ready with the pollen, that was no place to be if you had allergies.

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                            • #15
                              The first sweet (not field corn -- feed and meal varieties) cultivars were developed by our ancestors by selective breeding. The genes for high sugar content are recessive -- and not particularly pro-survival for the seed. Their sugar content ran in the 4-10% by wt range.

                              The super sweet strains were first breed in the 50's at University of Illinois. They are a result of a natural mutation in the the gene that causes shriveling and drying as corn ages. The sugar content in these species is >20% by wt.

                              The sugar enhanced cultivars result from a different mutation. They have 12-20% sugar by wt.

                              Prior to the 80's most sweet corn consumed in the US was not super sweet or sugar enhanced. But the genes that cause the higher sugar content, also increase shelf life. These varieties could endure long distance shipping and fairly rapidly became the preferred species -- also conditioning consumers to expect higher sugar corn.

                              My mom's favorite corn was Golden Bantam which is now a heirloom seed. But that corn was best right after it was picked. She and grandpa would start the kettle boiling and send me out to pick corn. Really fresh. I am not too fond of the higher sugar stuff you get in the store; I find it too sweet. But without these cultivars, those of us who live in cities wouldn't have much fresh corn.

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