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    Is Technivorm Moccamaster KBG Coffee Brewer worth the price?

    At the time of this review, the price for a Technivorm Moccamaster KBG Coffee Brewer is $309 on Amazon. Despite its price tag, this the best coffee market in the world has got 4.5 ratings from 1,097 customer reviews. So, what makes Moccamaster KBG Coffee Brewer appealing to coffee drinkers? While you can find an enormous number of good American-made coffee makers for under$100 , people are still opting for this expensive classic. Why is that?

    The unique selling point of the Moccamaster KBG Coffee Brewer is that each machine is handmade and individually tested in a live situation. The manufacturing takes place only in Amerongen, Netherlands. That’s why most Technivorm Moccamaster coffee makers have great durability and longevity.


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    An extra feature is that it will automatically shut off after 100 minutes of use for your safety and convenience. Besides, it comes with an automatic drip-stop feature that terminates the flow of coffee when pulling away the carafe.


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    • Volume: 1.25 Liters / 40 Ounces / 10 Cups
    • Dimension: 14.00"H 12.75"W 6.50"D
    • Material: durable metal housings and BPA/BPS/BPF & Phthalate free plastics
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    Last edited by kangnguyen; 07-13-2020, 05:50 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by kangnguyen View Post
    Hello

    Im Nowell, been reading this forum for a long time and finally decided to just join, lol. I have Lenape ancestry from Pennsylvania and GeeChee ancestry from South Carolina, but my family and I are Long Islanders. Im not connected to my cultures and heritages, which really bothers me, but I research as much as I can on them. I attend the Shinnecock Pow Wow every summer with my family and have a good time watching! Would like to get involved in the community somehow, but the reservation is a good 2 hour drive and I don't have a car lol. SOON. But yes, nice to meet y'all! Hope your all doing good!
    Thanks for joining the forum.New blood is always welcome..lol.

    I"m reading a book for the moment from James Alexander Thom "The Children of First man".The Lenape are mentioned in this book.
    It's about an expedition from Wales in the year 1169.They stayed a very long time in Tenessee and mixed with the local tribes.That's why the Mandan tribe had brown and blond hair, according to this book.Around 1400 all the people from Wales and many off the locals were killed by the Cherokee and Iroqui and the stone castle's burned to the ground.
    Maybe it's true and maybe not.
    I wonder what OlChemist has to say about this.

    Comment


    • #3
      This book is a work of historical fiction.


      The old Welsh Indian saw. White people have been trying to find themselves in our histories since they got here. I think it helps with the guilt. They can claim we're immigrants too. No muss, no fuss over displacing us. (Really, that hideous rhyme was an accident.)

      This article flies in the face of every Native origin story, but it is the current academic theory about where the X halotype came from in the new world. The results of genome mapping of DNA from the bones of an ancient little boy. Apparently, proto-Europeans were invading Siberia.... I guess it runs in the family.

      Mal’ta people in Siberia

      Nature: Upper Palaeolithic Siberian genome reveals dual ancestry of Native Americans

      Be careful what you wish for. There is a flip side to this folks. If you do prove some of us are descended from pre-1492 white guys, consider the land claims.

      I wouldn't say no to a vacation home in Charleroi.... In Gosselies, near Bruyerre Chocolates.... With some nice Giandujas and Manons (I think I got the names right) as payment for the centuries you've used my land without recompense, LOL.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by OLChemist View Post
        This book is a work of historical fiction.


        The old Welsh Indian saw. White people have been trying to find themselves in our histories since they got here. I think it helps with the guilt. They can claim we're immigrants too. No muss, no fuss over displacing us. (Really, that hideous rhyme was an accident.)

        This article flies in the face of every Native origin story, but it is the current academic theory about where the X halotype came from in the new world. The results of genome mapping of DNA from the bones of an ancient little boy. Apparently, proto-Europeans were invading Siberia.... I guess it runs in the family.

        Mal’ta people in Siberia

        Nature: Upper Palaeolithic Siberian genome reveals dual ancestry of Native Americans

        Be careful what you wish for. There is a flip side to this folks. If you do prove some of us are descended from pre-1492 white guys, consider the land claims.

        I wouldn't say no to a vacation home in Charleroi.... In Gosselies, near Bruyerre Chocolates.... With some nice Giandujas and Manons (I think I got the names right) as payment for the centuries you've used my land without recompense, LOL.
        Yeah, i had my doubts about this story.

        Is it also the same with the Vikings?

        You are more than welcome to taste some of our chocolats and yes , you spelled them correctly.

        I believe the US governement still has money in the bank for you guys that never has been claimed.I read something about that many years agoo.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Chalako View Post
          I believe the US governement still has money in the bank for you guys that never has been claimed.I read something about that many years agoo.
          Are you talking about the Black Hills Settlement?

          If so, read these:

          Tha Atlantic: Saying No to $1 Billion

          Native Sun News: There’s more to the Black Hills Settlement than meets the eye

          The money has great potential to poison.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by OLChemist View Post
            Are you talking about the Black Hills Settlement?

            If so, read these:

            Tha Atlantic: Saying No to $1 Billion

            Native Sun News: There’s more to the Black Hills Settlement than meets the eye

            The money has great potential to poison.
            Yeah, i think it was about this.

            Maybe the money is poisson but you can do a lot with it to improve the reservations.From wat i have read the conditions are very poor. And not only there but also for exemple in San Carlos.I saw it on Google earth and it's all sand and cheep houses and not even a single tree. I don't want to live in that place.

            Comment


            • #7
              First, the San Carlos are Apache. They aren't involved in this claim.

              I was out at the San Carlos rez a month and a half ago. Treeless and dry dirt is the natural condition of parts of Arizona. Depending on the area where the community is that may be normal. It can be jarring to see that part of the country if you're not used to it. When I first moved to NM (and painted a house there), I was taken back by how faded, run down and peeling so many buildings seemed. That was before I knew how hard the sun, wind and dryness was on buildings. Beware of judging lives and conditions on the basis of a few pictures.

              Second, realistically the 2 billion won't even begin to address the basic infrastructure problems on the seven Sioux reservations. Two billion doesn't buy what it used to.

              Third and in my mind the most important, there are spiritual and psychological dimensions to that money. Taking it would be like consenting to the sale of the land. It would be a surrender. When the money is gone, the people would have sold what their ancestors fought to keep.

              Comment


              • #8
                Ok, I have to come back to this.

                We have a very basic worldview difference here. Both in the settlement and in your view of the land on the rez.

                Imagine you live on a land where your ancestors bones and spirits dwell. Imagine that everything you saw reminded you of your creation story and other teachings. In each season, the land provided the materials for food, clothing, shelter and spiritual solace. You move in a geography of power and life. It is a living land, plants, trees, stones.... You have cultivated from birth relationships to places, plants, animals and Powers.

                Over here is a cave that leads to the underworld from which your people emerged. On that hill over there, Spirits will come and offer you kinship. In that canyon your ancestor hid from an enemy war party. On that butte, live the storm powers.... Even after invaders have seized the land, displaced you, and despoiled your sacred places, the relationships remain.

                How then would you view the land? How then would you view money for that land?

                Comment


                • #9
                  The creator knows every weed in your yard, or, should I say, His yard. Welcome Haatito

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by OLChemist View Post
                    Ok, I have to come back to this.

                    We have a very basic worldview difference here. Both in the settlement and in your view of the land on the rez.

                    Imagine you live on a land where your ancestors bones and spirits dwell. Imagine that everything you saw reminded you of your creation story and other teachings. In each season, the land provided the materials for food, clothing, shelter and spiritual solace. You move in a geography of power and life. It is a living land, plants, trees, stones.... You have cultivated from birth relationships to places, plants, animals and Powers.

                    Over here is a cave that leads to the underworld from which your people emerged. On that hill over there, Spirits will come and offer you kinship. In that canyon your ancestor hid from an enemy war party. On that butte, live the storm powers.... Even after invaders have seized the land, displaced you, and despoiled your sacred places, the relationships remain.

                    How then would you view the land? How then would you view money for that land?
                    Euh, i knew San Carlos is Apache.I was just given an exemple of a poor reservation besides yours.

                    I completly understand your point of view.After living my whole life in a village i'm forced to move somewhere else within 6 months.So, in a way i will also be heartbroken to live in another strange place.

                    I don't know why the governement just give The Black Hills back to your people.Has it any value to them because it's already stripped from it's gold and silver i believe.Maybe it's just to annoy you guy's they keep it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      To be realistic there are huge logistical issues. There are an estimated 125,00 people living in the Black Hills. You just can't boot all those people out. Those folks make their livelihoods on tourism, ranching, mining, etc. They don't take too kindly to idea of losing everything either.

                      As for a transfer of federal and state park lands and other public lands, there are significant issues as well. There are grazing, logging and other usage leases of those lands. Then there is the matter of public access. Americans love their parklands and don't take kindly to inference with their use. Look at the outcry over attempting to restrict climbing at Devil's Tower during Sun Dance season.

                      The best we can hope for is limited buy backs, like happened with Pe' Sla, and joint control of some public lands. For this ever to happen, the tribes must demonstrate the capability to manage the land and insure equitable access. There are matters of legal jurisdiction, law enforcement, insurance, worker protection, etc.

                      This article gives you some idea of the issues involved in just one relatively small area:

                      KOTA report on Pe'Sla transfer
                      Last edited by OLChemist; 12-08-2019, 08:15 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        OL, thank you. Very interesting.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by kangnguyen View Post
                          Hello

                          Im Nowell, been reading this forum for a long time and finally decided to just join, lol. I have Lenape ancestry from Pennsylvania and GeeChee ancestry from South Carolina, but my family and I are Long Islanders. Im not connected to my cultures and heritages, which really bothers me, but I research as much as I can on them. I attend the Shinnecock Pow Wow every summer with my family and have a good time watching! Would like to get involved in the community somehow, but the reservation is a good 2 hour drive and I don't have a car lol. SOON. But yes, nice to meet y'all! Hope your all doing good!

                          Hello thx for FINALLY joining, hehehehe
                          lisaironmaker

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [QUOTE

                            This article gives you some idea of the issues involved in just one relatively small area:

                            KOTA report on Pe'Sla transfer[/QUOTE]

                            Is this Joe Buck also a Sioux?

                            They have a hurde of four buffalo's and they want 100 buffalo's.That will take a long time to breed or a lot of money.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Chalako View Post
                              Is this Joe Buck also a Sioux?
                              No idea. The BIA records in excess of 120,000 enrolled members on just 7 of the Sioux reservations.


                              Originally posted by Chalako View Post
                              That will take a long time to breed or a lot of money.
                              And probably a lot of consorting with Ted Turner, LOL. Getting breeding stock without traces of cow genes can be challenging.

                              Comment

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