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  • Sgt. 1st Class Dustin Ard
    Died August 29, 2019 Serving During Operation Freedom’s Sentinel



    31, of Hyde Park, Utah, died Aug. 29, 2019, from wounds sustained during combat operations in Zabul Province, Afghanistan. The incident is under investigation. He was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne) at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington.


    ---------------------------------------

    Sgt. 1st Class Dustin Ard, a Green Beret from 1st Special Forces Group, died from wounds sustained during combat operations in Zabul Province, Afghanistan on Thursday, U.S. Army Special Operations Command has confirmed.
    Ard, 31, left behind a young daughter and a pregnant wife, according to a local newspaper.
    “We received news that we lost our son Dustin" in Afghanistan, said his father, Bruce Ard, according to a Facebook post Friday by Idaho State Rep. Rod Furniss. "My heart has a hole so big I can hardly stand it. He was the finest young man I have ever known. Not because he was my son but because of the person he is. A great son, brother, father and husband. He loved his country and was the kind of person we should all be. Son, I love you and know we will see each other again. I will miss you every day I live without you. Love Dad.”
    According to The New York Times, Ard was on a joint operation with a unit of Afghan commandos when he died. The details of his death have not been released.
    Born in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on Oct. 4, 1987, Ard enlisted in the Army in Hyde Park, Utah in 2011, as a Special Forces candidate through the 18X program, according to Lt. Col. Loren Bymer, a USASOC spokesman, in a media release.
    Ard was assigned to Fort Bragg, North Carolina and attended Special Forces Assessment and Selection and graduated from the Special Forces Qualification Course in 2015. He was then assigned to 2nd Battalion, 1st SFG (A) at Joint Base Lewis–McChord, Washington, as a Special Forces communications sergeant.
    “Sgt. 1st Class Ard’s loss is felt across our 1st Special Forces Group Family,” said Col. Owen G. Ray, 1st Special Forces Group commander, in the release. “Our priority now is to take care of his family and our Soldiers and provide the best possible care that we can during this incredible time of need.”
    Ard deployed twice to Afghanistan in support of the Resolute Support mission and participated in multiple Joint Combined Exchange Training exercises in Indonesia.
    Ard leaves behind his wife, Mary, and their 3-year-old daughter Reagan, according to the Post Register. The couple also is expecting a son.
    Bruce Ard, mayor of the town of Ammon, Idaho, said his son joined the Army hoping to find a new challenge after completing a mission and college, according to the newspaper. He served for nine years, becoming a Green Beret.
    Bruce Ard said his son remained focused on his family even when serving thousands of miles away.
    “He was still just Dustin,” Bruce said, according to the newspaper. “He was a loving, kind, gentle soul, and he knew what he had to do.”
    Ard’s military education includes the Basic, Advanced, and Senior Leader Courses; U.S. Army Airborne School; Military Free Fall Course; Special Operations Joint Terminal Attack Controller Course; Special Operations Sensitive Site Exploitation Course; Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape School; Korean Special Operations Language Course; and the Special Forces Qualification Course.
    Ard’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal; Army Achievement Medal; Army Good Conduct Medal (second award); National Defense Service Medal; Afghanistan Campaign Medal (Campaign Star); Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon (third award); Army Service Ribbon; NATO Medal; Army Special Forces Tab; Combat Infantry Badge; Parachutist Badge and Military Free Fall Parachutist Badge.
    This year has been the deadliest for U.S. forces in Afghanistan since the mission to the country scaled down at the start of 2015 and changed names from Operation Enduring Freedom to Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.
    If this latest casualty is confirmed to have been as a result of enemy fire, it would bring the number of U.S. troops killed in action this year to 15, according to Defense Department figures.
    Another 86 U.S. service members have been wounded so far this year.
    The U.S. military currently has about 14,000 troops in Afghanistan, alongside international troops, to advise and assist Afghan defense forces and to fight extremist groups like the Islamic State and al-Qaida.
    President Donald Trump said he plans to withdraw thousands of U.S. forces from Afghanistan, but will keep 8,600 troops there for the foreseeable future, pending the outcome of U.S. peace talks with the Taliban, which appear to be in their final stages.
    Attached Files
    sigpic
    R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





    Comment


    • As of today, September 14, 2019...

      6971
      Number of Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn casualties as confirmed by U.S. Central Command




      Honoring those who paid the ultimate sacrifice...lest we forget.
      sigpic
      R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





      Comment


      • Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy W. Griffin
        Died September 16, 2019 Serving During Operation Freedom’s Sentinel



        40, of Greenbrier, Tennessee, was killed Sept. 16, 2019, by small arms fire when hi s unit was engaged in combat operations in Wardak Province, Afghanistan. The incident is under investigation. Griffin was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. Griffin was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal and Purple Heart.


        The Defense Department has identified an Army Special Forces soldier killed in action Monday.

        Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy W. Griffin, 41, was killed in action by small arms fire during combat operations in Wardak Province, Afghanistan, Army officials announced Tuesday morning.

        Griffin, who was from Greenbrier, Tennessee, served as a Special Forces communications sergeant with 3rd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. He was on his fourth combat deployment.

        “The loss of Sgt. 1st Class Griffin is felt across the 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne) Family and the entire Special Forces community,” Col. Owen G. Ray, commander, 1st Special Forces Group said in a statement.

        Griffin was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal and Purple Heart. His death brings the number of U.S. troops killed in action in Afghanistan this year to 17, according to Defense Department figures. More than 100 other American personnel have been wounded in combat in 2019.

        “He was a warrior — an accomplished, respected and loved Special Forces Soldier that will never be forgotten. We ask that you keep his Family and teammates in your thoughts and prayers," Ray added.

        A defense official told Army Times that there are no indications the attack was a green-on-blue incident.

        Griffin was born in Cristobal, Panama, on Dec. 7, 1978, and enlisted into the U.S. Army on April 6, 2004, according to an Army Special Operations Command press release.

        Griffin was previously assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division and 7th Special Forces Group before he attended and graduated from the Special Forces Qualification Course on September 18, 2014.

        Griffin had deployed with the 82nd Airborne Division to Iraq in 2006 and Afghanistan in 2009. He deployed again to Afghanistan in 2016 with 1st Group, as well as served on an overseas rotation to Korea in 2018.

        His death comes after peace talks between U.S. diplomats and the Taliban broke down earlier this month, and amid warnings from the top U.S. general for NATO that he expects increased violence in Afghanistan as that country’s elections draw nearer.

        The many schools Griffin graduated from included the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center’s Basic Korean Course; Ranger School; Basic and Advanced Military Free Fall Parachutist Course; Military Freefall Advanced Tactical Infiltration Course; Special Operations Joint Terminal Attack Controller Course; and the Special Forces Intelligence Sergeants Course.

        Griffin’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal; Army Commendation Medal; Army Achievement Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters; the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with three campaign stars; the Iraq Campaign Medal with two campaign stars; the Korea Defense Service Medal; the Parachutist Badge; Master Military Free Fall Parachutist Badge; Combat Infantry Badge; Combat Action Badge; Ranger and Army Special Forces Tabs.
        Attached Files
        sigpic
        R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





        Comment


        • I am at the Coeur D’ Alene Resort & Casino in Worley, Idaho for the Veterans Stickgame Tournament. Currently, it’s open games and registration is tomorrow. A total of $39,000 is up for grabs if your team can win it all.
          sigpic
          R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





          Comment


          • As of 12 November 2019...

            6973
            Number of Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn casualties as confirmed by U.S. Central Command



            Honoring those who paid the ultimate sacrifice...lest we forget.
            sigpic
            R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





            Comment


            • As of today, 24 February 2020...

              6986
              Number of Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn casualties as confirmed by U.S. Central Command


              Honoring those who paid the ultimate sacrifice, lest we forget.
              sigpic
              R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





              Comment


              • Army Sgt. 1st Class Antonio R. Rodriguez
                Died February 8, 2020 Serving During Operation Freedom’s Sentinel




                28, of Las Cruces, New Mexico, died Feb. 1, 2020, in an apparent insider attack in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan. Sgt. 1st Class Javier Gutierrez was also killed in the attack. The incident is under investigation. Both men were assigned to 3rd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group, out of Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Both soldiers were posthumously promoted to sergeant 1st class and awarded Bronze Star medals and Purple Hearts.





                The Pentagon has released the identities of a Green Beret and a former Ranger turned cryptologic linguist killed in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, on Saturday.

                Sgt. 1st Class Javier J. Gutierrez and Sgt. 1st Class Antonio R. Rodriguez were killed in an apparent insider attack – one that early reports indicate may not have been affiliated with the Taliban.

                Both men were 28 years old and assigned to 3rd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group, out of Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, according to Lt. Col. Loren Bymer, an Army Special Operations Command spokesman.

                Both soldiers were posthumously promoted to sergeant 1st class and awarded Bronze Star medals and Purple Hearts.

                Their deaths bring the number of U.S. military casualties in Afghanistan this year to four. Two paratroopers were also killed by a roadside bomb in January. Seventeen American combat casualties in Afghanistan in 2019 made it the worst year since 2014.

                “Our priority now is to take care of his family and teammates, we will provide the best possible care possible during these trying times," said Col. John W. Sannes, 7th Group commander, in a prepared statement.

                Gutierrez was born in Jacksonville, North Carolina, on Aug. 12, 1991. He enlisted in the Army in 2009 as an infantryman and was first assigned to Fort Bragg’s 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment. He deployed once to Iraq as a paratrooper with the unit.

                He attended Special Forces Assessment and Selection in 2012 and graduated in 2015 as a Special Forces communications sergeant and reported to 7th Group. This was his first deployment to Afghanistan.

                “Sgt. 1st Class Gutierrez’ was a warrior that exemplified selfless service and a commitment to the mission, both values that we embody here in the 7th Special Forces Group,” Sannes said in his statement. “Sgt. 1st Class Rodriguez was selfless and served honorably; he was certainly among the best in our unit."

                Rodriguez was born in Las Cruces, New Mexico, on July 26, 1991. He graduated from high school in the spring of 2009 and enlisted in the Army the following October. Rodriguez completed one station unit training at Fort Benning, Georgia, followed by jump school and the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program.

                He was first assigned to 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, also based out of Fort Benning.

                Rodriguez deployed eight times as a Ranger, according to the release. In 2018, he re-classified as a cryptologic linguist with Spanish as his chosen language. He went on to deploy twice with 7th Group.

                Six other U.S. personnel were wounded in the attack that took the lives of Rodriguez and Gutierrez. The attack came after a key leader engagement at the Sherzad district center in Nangarhar province.

                However, the incident may not have been one backed by the Taliban.

                An anonymous Afghan defense ministry official told the Associated Press that the shooter was an Afghan soldier who had argued with U.S. troops before opening fire. That Afghan official said the attacker was not a Taliban infiltrator.

                “Upon completing a key-leader engagement at the district center, current reports indicate an individual in an Afghan uniform opened fire on the combined U.S. and Afghan force with a machine gun,” Army Col. Sonny Leggett, spokesman for U.S. Forces-Afghanistan, wrote in an emailed statement.

                “We are still collecting information and the cause or motive behind the attack is unknown at this time. The incident is under investigation,” he added.

                Nangarhar province has long been a bastion for the Islamic State’s Afghanistan-based franchise. The ISIS-aligned militants there have been battled back by both American and Taliban forces in recent years.

                Peace talks with the Taliban are ongoing, but they have been hamstrung by ongoing violence.

                Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said he wants “demonstrable evidence” that the Taliban can carry through on their promise to reduce violence in the country, according to the Associated Press.

                There are roughly 13,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Defense Secretary Mark Esper has said the Pentagon may reduce the American footprint in the country to 8,600 independent of any deal with the Taliban.
                Attached Files
                sigpic
                R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                Comment


                • Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Diego D. Pongo
                  Died March 8, 2020 Serving During Operation Inherent Resolve






                  34, of Simi Valley, California, was died March 8, 2020, while clearing a tunnel complex of Islamic State fighters in the Makhmur Mountains of southern Iraq. Capt. Moises A. Navas, 34, was also killed in the incident. Both Marines were assigned to the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, Marine Forces Special Operations Command, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Pongo’s personal awards included a Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device, a Purple Heart, two Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, two Combat Action Ribbons, the Army Valorous Unit Award, four Good Conduct Medals, two Humanitarian Service Medals, the National Defense Service Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, and four Sea Service Deployment Ribbons, the MARSOC release said.


                  The Department of Defense has identified two Marine Raiders who were killed Sunday in Iraq while clearing a tunnel complex full of Islamic State fighters.

                  Gunnery Sgt. Diego D. Pongo, 34, of Simi Valley, California, and Capt. Moises A. Navas, 34, of Germantown, Maryland, were the two Marines killed, according to a Department of Defense press release Tuesday morning.

                  Both Marines were assigned to the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, Marine Forces Special Operations Command, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

                  Pongo joined the Corps in 2004 as an 0311 rifleman. In 2008 he completed Scout Sniper Basic Course and was a sniper team leader when he deployed to Afghanistan in with 1st Battalion, 5th Marines.

                  He became a Marine Raider in 2011 where he completed deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, a release from Marine Forces Special Operations Command said.

                  Pongo’s personal awards included a Bronze Star Medal with Combat Distinguishing Device, a Purple Heart, two Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, two Combat Action Ribbons, the Army Valorous Unit Award, four Good Conduct Medals, two Humanitarian Service Medals, the National Defense Service Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, and four Sea Service Deployment Ribbons, the MARSOC release said.

                  Navas also enlisted in the Corps in 2004, becoming a sergeant before earning his officer commission through the Marine Enlisted Commissioning Education Program, the MARSOC release said.

                  He became a Marine Raider in 2016 where he spent the last four years as a team commander and company executive officer, the release said. Navas had recently been selected for promotion to Major the release added.

                  His personal awards included a Purple Heart, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, Combat Action Ribbon, two Good Conduct Medals, and the Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal, the Humanitarian Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, and four Sea Service Deployment Ribbons, according to the release.

                  “The loss of these two incredible individuals is being felt across our organization, but it cannot compare to the loss that their families and teammates are experiencing," Col. John Lynch the regimental commander for the two Raiders killed, said in the statement.

                  “Both men epitomize what it means to be a Marine Raider," Lynch added. " They were intelligent, courageous, and loyal. They were dedicated leaders, true professionals in their craft, and willing to go above and beyond for the mission and their team.

                  The Marines were working with Iraqi special operators in a large operation to clear out ISIS outposts in the southern Makhmur Mountains in Iraq, Marine Corps Times reported Monday.

                  The fighting was so intense and the region so remote it took coalition forces six hours to recover the bodies of the two Marines, according to officials.

                  The military estimated that between 17–19 ISIS fighters were killed in the operation.

                  The two Marines were part of Operation Inherent Resolve, a multinational operation started in 2014 tasked with defeating ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

                  The two new deaths bring the total of troops killed in action as part of OIR to 19, according to the Defense Casualty Analysis System.

                  The last American service member killed in combat as part of Operation Inherent Resolve was also a Marine Raider ― Gunnery Sgt. Scott A. Koppenhafer, 35, of Mancos, Colorado.

                  Koppenhafer died in August 2019 while advising Iraqi forces in its fight against the Islamic State in Ninewah province, Iraq, Marine Corps Times previously reported.

                  “On behalf of the Marine Raider Regiment and all of MARSOC, our most sincere condolences go out to the families of Gunnery Sgt. Pongo and Capt. Navas,” Lynch said.

                  “In times like these we come together and rely on each other, sharing our burdens and providing strength to those that need it. We will do everything we can to lift up and support our grieving families in order to honor the incredible lives and the ultimate sacrifices of Gunnery Sgt. Pongo and Capt. Navas,” Lynch added.
                  Attached Files
                  sigpic
                  R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                  Comment


                  • Army Spc. Juan Mendez Covarrubias
                    Died March 11, 2020 Serving During Operation Inherent Resolve


                    27, of Hanford, California, died March 11, 2020, in a rocket attack on Camp Taji, Iraq. Air Force Staff Sgt. Marshal Roberts was also killed in the incident. Covarrubias was assigned to 1st Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas.


                    The military on Friday identified the two U.S. troops killed in a rocket attack on Camp Taji in Iraq as Army Spc. Juan Miguel Mendez Covarrubias, 27, of Hanford, California, and Air Force Staff Sgt. Marshal D. Roberts, 28, of Owasso, Oklahoma.
                    Mendez Covarrubias was assigned to 1st Battalion, 227th Aviation Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas.
                    Roberts was assigned to 219th Engineering Installation Squadron of the Oklahoma Air National Guard’s 138th Fighter Wing.
                    The third service member killed in the attack, U.K. Lance Corporal Brodie Gillon, 26, was previously identified by the British military.
                    “The international military coalition is capable and credible because of warriors like Juan, Brodie, and Marshal,” said Lt. Gen. Pat White, commanding general of Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent Resolve, the coalition to defeat the Islamic State. “They volunteered to serve the United States and United Kingdom to improve their lives and help keep the world free from ISIS terrorism. Our fallen comrades have a legacy that will never be forgotten.”
                    The Oklahoma Air National Guard said Roberts enlisted in May 2014, and is the first Oklahoma Air Guardsman to be killed in action since Sept. 11, 2001. He is the 20th Oklahoma National Guardsman who has died while deployed since 9/11.
                    “With the passing of Staff Sgt. Roberts, the 138th family has lost a dedicated airman, mentor and leader,” 138th wing commander Col. Michael Meason said in a release. “Our thoughts and prayers are with Staff Sgt. Roberts’ family and friends as we stand with them through this difficult time. They are and always will be part of the 138th family.”
                    The governor of Oklahoma, Kevin Stitt, and Maj. Gen. Michael Thompson, the adjutant general, also paid tribute to Roberts.
                    “Oklahomans all across the state mourn the loss of Staff Sgt. Roberts,” Stitt said. “Today serves as a reminder of the many brave men and women who put their lives on the line every day to defend our state and country. Our prayers are with Staff Sgt. Roberts’ friends and family during this time, and the state is prepared to offer any support possible.”
                    Mendez Covarrubias entered the Army in June 2018 as a signal support systems specialist. Since March 2019, he has been assigned to 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood.
                    He deployed in support of the Inherent Resolve mission in October.
                    Mendez Covarrubias’ battalion commander extended his condolences to family of the fallen soldier, who he called a “cherished” member of the unit.
                    “The regiment and his fellow Soldiers are grieving the loss of a true warrior,” said Lt. Col. Adam S. Camarano. "Command Sgt. Maj. Travis Eicher and I would like to express our most sincere condolences to the family and friends of Spc. Mendez Covarrubias. His loss is felt across the our formation and he will not be forgotten.”
                    Inherent Resolve commander Lt. Gen. Pat White, who also commands III Corps at Fort Hood, issued a separate statement for Mendez Covarrubias.
                    “On behalf of the Phantom Corps and Fort Hood, Texas, community, Emma and I send our deepest condolences to Juan’s family, friends, and 1st Cavalry Division troopers during this difficult time of mourning," White said. "Specialist Mendez was a warrior who will forever be remembered.”
                    The top commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East, Marine Corps Gen. Kenneth “Frank” McKenzie Jr., told lawmakers Thursday that an Iranian proxy group known as Kataib Hezbollah is believed to be responsible for the attack.
                    A dozen other people were also injured in the volley of 18 rockets fired at the base north of Baghdad.
                    The U.S. launched retaliatory strikes on the Shia militia group later on Thursday. The Pentagon said it hit five Kataib Hezbollah weapons facilities. Iraq’s military said that the U.S. strikes killed five Iraqi security force members and one civilian.
                    Attached Files
                    sigpic
                    R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                    Comment


                    • Why?

                      Doesn't man ever learn?
                      Those who know do not write and those who write may not know. Frank W. Louis, No such Agency

                      True peace between nations will only happen when there is true peace within people’s souls.
                      Black Elk

                      “Tell me, and I will listen.
                      Show me, and I will understand.
                      Involve me, and I will learn.”
                      Lakota Proverb

                      God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
                      Courage to change the things I can,
                      And wisdom to know the difference.
                      Living one day at a time,
                      Enjoying one moment at a time,
                      Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace.
                      (Reinhold Niebuhr, but the origin is debated)

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Broken Arrow View Post
                        Why?

                        Doesn't man ever learn?
                        Are you really that stupid? People serve their Country cause they want to. Even if it means being killed in action or during training. These servicemen who I post gave their lives to defend our freedom here in the USA. If you don’t like it, go be a snowflake on a different thread. This one is for heroes who gave their lives to defend a nation.
                        sigpic
                        R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                        Comment


                        • Sigh,

                          have you ever been at Dachau, Bergen-Belsen, Theresienstadt, Birkenau, Flossenbürg, Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen, ... ?

                          Those who you honor here pay the ultimate price because of power-hungry people. In the past, the present and the future.

                          Without the Heroes, the world would be even worse than the world already is. Yet it is sad for every one who died to defend the people, the country, freedom and justice.

                          We are in need of those who serve. I have been lucky not to be in a shooting war but have seen those idiots who are responsible that people die for their benefits. Those shall be punished after legal proceedings.

                          I believe in "Si vis pacem para bellum" yet I don't follow anybody because he wants me to follow unconditionally. I have seen in my history what consequences follow such a demand.
                          Last edited by Broken Arrow; 03-25-2020, 05:46 PM. Reason: Forgotten quote
                          Those who know do not write and those who write may not know. Frank W. Louis, No such Agency

                          True peace between nations will only happen when there is true peace within people’s souls.
                          Black Elk

                          “Tell me, and I will listen.
                          Show me, and I will understand.
                          Involve me, and I will learn.”
                          Lakota Proverb

                          God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
                          Courage to change the things I can,
                          And wisdom to know the difference.
                          Living one day at a time,
                          Enjoying one moment at a time,
                          Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace.
                          (Reinhold Niebuhr, but the origin is debated)

                          Comment

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