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  • Hall of Valor

    AWARDS FOR VALOR

    Navy Cross Awarded for actions during the Global War on Terror

    The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Lance Corporal Brady A. Gustafson, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Turret Gunner, Lead Vehicle, 3d Squad, 2d Platoon, Company G, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, Marine Corps Forces, Central Command (Forward), in support of Operation Enduring Freedom on 21 July 2008. In the village of Shewan, Afghanistan, Lance Corporal Gustafson's squad was ambushed from multiple positions by enemy insurgents with rocket-propelled grenades and medium machine gun fire. The attack was initiated by a rocket-propelled grenade that pierced the hull of his Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle and struck him, resulting in severe traumatic injury to his right leg. Despite bleeding profusely, Lance Corporal Gustafson quickly identified enemy positions and engaged them with accurate fire from his M-240B machine gun while a tourniquet was applied to his leg. When the vehicle to their rear was disabled by further rocket-propelled grenade fire, he directed his driver to push the vehicle out of the enemy's kill zone, and shortly thereafter the vehicle was engulfed in flames. Although medium machine gun fire continued to impact around him, Lance Corporal Gustafson remained steadfast, returning concentrated fire on the enemy. His effective suppression allowed the Marines behind him to safely dismount and exit their burning vehicle. Lance Corporal Gustafson braved the effects of shock and reloaded his weapon twice, firing more than 400 rounds, before he allowed himself to be pulled from the turret and receive medical treatment. By his bold actions, daring initiative, and total devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Gustafson reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

    Service: Marine Corps

    Rank: Lance Corporal

    Presented at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Training Center, Twentynine Palms, California, on March 27, 2009
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    R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...






  • #2
    Distinguished Service Cross Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Sergeant Richard A. Hendrick, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (South), Task Force 1, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant Hendrick distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 April 1971 while serving as the team leader of a small reconnaissance patrol deployed deep within enemy controlled territory. After engaging a hostile force, Sergeant Hendrick deployed his men into a defensive perimeter. Returning to the point of initial contact, he retrieved two wounded allied soldiers and eliminated several enemy soldiers during the rescue mission. As the superior-size force launched an attack, Sergeant Hendrick exposed himself to the hostile fusillade in order to place accurate suppressive fire upon the attackers, repelling their advance. During the second attack, he was wounded by an enemy hand grenade. Ignoring his own wounds, Sergeant Hendrick continued to put devastating fire upon the foe. Summoning air support, he directed their fire upon the belligerent force. Then, as evacuation helicopters arrived, Sergeant Hendrick assisted two wounded soldiers in hooking up to extraction ropes from the hovering aircraft while under constant enemy fire. Sergeant Hendrick's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

    Service: Army

    Rank: Sergeant

    Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2264-238 (June 9, 1971)
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    R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





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    • #3
      Silver Star Awarded for actions during the World War II

      The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Gunner's Mate Third Class Lamar C. Palmer, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a member of the Armed Guard aboard a merchant vessel prior to and during the torpedoing of that vessel by enemy forces during World War II. Blacked out and zigzagging in a choppy sea with poor visibility prevailing, the vessel withstood a prolonged attack. Under such hazardous and adverse conditions, Gunner's Mate Third Class Palmer and the other members of the Armed Guard, coolly and accurately countered enemy fire almost without rest, accounting for the destruction of two enemy planes. Gunner's Mate Third Class Palmer's gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own safety, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

      Service: Navy

      Rank: Petty Officer Third Class

      Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 311 (February 1943)
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      R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





      Comment


      • #4
        Medal of Honor Awarded for actions during the Korean War

        For conspicuous gallantry and indomitable courage above and beyond the call of duty while serving with Company F, 223d Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Tutayon, Korea, on 19 and 20 July 1953. Sergeant Collier was pointman and assistant leader of a combat patrol committed to make contact with the enemy. As the patrol moved forward through the darkness, he and his commanding officer slipped and fell from a steep, 60-foot cliff and were injured. Incapacitated by a badly sprained ankle which prevented immediate movement, the officer ordered the patrol to return to the safety of friendly lines. Although suffering from a painful back injury, Sergeant Collier elected to remain with his leader, and before daylight they managed to crawl back up and over the mountainous terrain to the opposite valley where they concealed themselves in the brush until nightfall, then edged toward their company positions. Shortly after leaving the daylight retreat they were ambushed and, in the ensuing fire fight, Sergeant Collier killed two hostile soldiers, received painful wounds, and was separated from his companion. Then, ammunition expended, he closed in hand-to-hand combat with four attacking hostile infantrymen, killing, wounding, and routing the foe with his bayonet. He was mortally wounded during this action, but made a valiant attempt to reach and assist his leader in a desperate effort to save his comrade's life without regard for his own personal safety. Sergeant Collier's unflinching courage, consummate devotion to duty, and gallant self-sacrifice reflect lasting glory upon himself and uphold the noble traditions of the military service. Gilbert Georgie Collier

        Service: Army

        Rank: Sergeant

        General Orders No. 3, January 12, 1955
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        R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





        Comment


        • #5
          Air Force Cross Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

          The President of the United States of America, authorized by Title 10, Section 8742, United States Code, takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Staff Sergeant Jon D. Harston (AFSN: 12881152), United States Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Helicopter Flight Mechanic on board a CH-53 helicopter of the 21st Special Operations Squadron, Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, in action on 15 May 1975, at Koh Tang Island, Cambodia. On that date, while engaged in the rescue of the crew and recovery of the S.S. MAYAGUEZ, Staff Sergeant Harston's helicopter encountered extremely heavy hostile fire and crashed at the shoreline of Koh Tang Island. Although wounded in the leg, Sergeant Harston reentered the burning aircraft and led three Marines to safety. As the survivors of the crash swam away from the beach, Sergeant Harston provided covering fire. He returned to the wrecked helicopter again to pull out another wounded Marine. He then kept himself and two wounded Marines afloat with his damaged life preserver until they were rescued by a navy destroyer approximately three hours later. Through his extraordinary heroism and willpower, in the face of the enemy, Staff Sergeant Harston reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

          Service: Air Force

          Rank: Staff Sergeant

          Department of the Air Force, Special Orders GB-583 (July 14, 1975)
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          R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





          Comment


          • #6
            Medal of Honor Awarded for actions during the Global War on Terror

            For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Automatic Weapons Gunner in SEAL Team 3, Naval Special Warfare Task Group Arabian Peninsula, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 29 September 2006. As a member of a combined SEAL and Iraqi Army sniper overwatch element, tasked with providing early warning and stand-off protection from a rooftop in an insurgent-held sector of Ar Ramadi, Iraq, Petty Officer Monsoor distinguished himself by his exceptional bravery in the face of grave danger. In the early morning, insurgents prepared to execute a coordinated attack by reconnoitering the area around the element's position. Element snipers thwarted the enemy's initial attempt by eliminating two insurgents. The enemy continued to assault the element, engaging them with a rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fire. As enemy activity increased, Petty Officer Monsoor took position with his machine gun between two teammates on an outcropping of the roof. While the SEALs vigilantly watched for enemy activity, an insurgent threw a hand grenade from an unseen location, which bounced off Petty Officer Monsoor's chest and landed in front of him. Although only he could have escaped the blast, Petty Officer Monsoor chose instead to protect his teammates. Instantly and without regard for his own safety, he threw himself onto the grenade to absorb the force of the explosion with his body, saving the lives of his two teammates. By his undaunted courage, fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of certain death, Petty Officer Monsoor gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Michael
            A. Monsoor

            Service: Navy
            sigpic
            R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





            Comment


            • #7
              Medal of Honor Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

              For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a machine gunner attached to the First Platoon, Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, on 3 and 4 July 1967, in action against armed enemy forces in Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Newlin, with four other Marines, was manning a key position on the perimeter of the Nong Son outpost when the enemy launched a savage and well coordinated mortar and infantry assault, seriously wounding him and killing his four comrades. Propping himself against his machinegun, he poured a deadly accurate stream of fire into the charging ranks of the Viet Cong. Though repeatedly hit by small-arms fire, he twice repelled enemy attempts to overrun his position. During the third attempt, a grenade explosion wounded him again and knocked him to the ground unconscious. The Viet Cong guerrillas, believing him dead, bypassed him and continued their assault on the main force. Meanwhile, Private First Class Newlin regained consciousness, crawled back to his weapon, and brought it to bear on the rear of the enemy, causing havoc and confusion among them. Spotting the enemy attempting to bring a captured 106 recoilless weapon to bear on other Marine positions, he shifted his fire, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and preventing them from firing the captured weapon. He then shifted his fire back to the primary enemy force, causing the enemy to stop their assault on the Marine bunkers and to once again attack his machinegun position. Valiantly fighting off two more enemy assaults, he firmly held his ground until mortally wounded. Private First Class Newlin had single-handedly broken up and disorganized the entire enemy assault force, causing them to lose momentum and delaying them long enough for his fellow Marines to organize a defense and beat off their secondary attack. His indomitable courage, fortitude, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of almost certain death reflect great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. Melvin Earl Newlin

              Service: Marine Corps

              Rank: Private First Class
              sigpic
              R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





              Comment


              • #8
                Ernest "Chief" Childers
                Date of birth: 1 Feb. 1918
                Place of birth: Broken Arrow, Okla.
                Home of record: Tulsa, Okla.

                Ernest Childers entered active duty in the U.S. Army from the Oklahoma National Guard. A Creek Indian, he was the first Native American to earn the Medal of Honor since the days of the Indian Campaigns in the previous century. He and fellow recipient Jack Montgomery both graduated from the same school, the Chilocco Indian Agriculture School in Chilocco, Oklahoma.


                Medal of Honor Awarded for actions during the World War II
                For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty in action on 22 September 1943, at Oliveto, Italy, while serving with Company C, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Although Second Lieutenant Childers previously had just suffered a fractured instep he, with eight enlisted men, advanced up a hill toward enemy machinegun nests. The group advanced to a rock wall overlooking a cornfield and Second Lieutenant Childers ordered a base of fire laid across the field so that he could advance. When he was fired upon by two enemy snipers from a nearby house he killed both of them. He moved behind the machinegun nests and killed all occupants of the nearer one. He continued toward the second one and threw rocks into it. When the two occupants of the nest raised up, he shot one. The other was killed by one of the eight enlisted men. Second Lieutenant Childers continued his advance toward a house farther up the hill, and single-handed, captured an enemy mortar observer. The exceptional leadership, initiative, calmness under fire, and conspicuous gallantry displayed by Second Lieutenant Childers were an inspiration to his men. Ernest "Chief" Childers

                Service: Army

                Rank: Second Lieutenant

                General Orders No. 30, April 8, 1944
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                R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                Comment


                • #9
                  Matthew Axelson
                  Date of birth: 25 June 1976
                  Place of birth: Cupertino, Calif.
                  Home of record: Cupertino, Calif.

                  Before enlisting in the Navy, Matthew Axelson earned a degree in Political Science from California State University-Chico. As a member of a 4-man SEAL Team in Afghanistan, he and two of his comrades were killed in action, with only one team member surviving. The mission resulted in one team member receiving a posthumous award of the Medal of Honor, and Matthew Axelson and the other two team members earning the Navy Cross, making them the most decorated SEAL Team in history.


                  Navy Cross Awarded for actions during the Global War on Terror

                  The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Sonar Technician Second Class Matthew Gene Axelson, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in actions against the enemy while serving in a four-man Special Reconnaissance element with SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team ONE, Naval Special Warfare Task Unit, Afghanistan from 27 to 28 June 2005. Petty Officer Axelson demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the face of grave danger in the vicinity of Asadabad, Konar Province, Afghanistan. Operating in the middle of an enemy-controlled area, in extremely rugged terrain, his Special Reconnaissance element was tasked with locating a high-level Anti-Coalition Militia leader, in support of a follow-on direct action mission to disrupt enemy activity. On 28 June 2005, the element was spotted by Anti-Coalition Militia sympathizers, who immediately revealed their position to the militia fighters. As a result, the element directly encountered the enemy. Demonstrating exceptional resolve and fully understanding the gravity of the situation, Petty Officer Axelson's element bravely engaged the militia, who held both a numerical and positional advantage. The ensuing firefight resulted in numerous enemy personnel killed, with several of the Navy members suffering casualties. Ignoring his injuries and demonstrating exceptional composure, Petty Officer Axelson advised the teammate closest to him to escape while he provided cover fire. With total disregard for his own life and thinking only of his teammate's survival, he continued to attack the enemy, eliminating additional militia fighters, until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. A champion of freedom, Petty Officer Axelson will be remembered for his self-sacrificing actions in the continuing Global War on Terrorism. By his undaunted courage, fortitude under fire, and unwavering dedication to duty, Petty Officer Axelson reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for the cause of freedom.

                  Service: Navy

                  Rank: Petty Officer Second Class
                  sigpic
                  R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Randall David Shughart
                    Date of birth: 13 Aug. 1958
                    Place of birth: Lincoln, Neb.
                    Home of record: Newville, Pa.



                    Medal of Honor Awarded for actions during the United Nations Operations in Somalia II

                    For actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as a Sniper Team Member, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia, in support of Operation RESTORE HOPE. Sergeant First Class Shughart provided precision sniper fires from the lead helicopter during an assault on a building and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. While providing critical suppressive fires at the second crash site, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the site. Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After their third request to be inserted, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader received permission to perform this volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader were inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Sergeant First Class Shughart pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Sergeant First Class Shughart used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers while traveling the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. Sergeant First Class Shughart continued his protective fire until he depleted his ammunition and was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot's life. Sergeant First Class Shughart's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the United States Army. Randall David Shughart

                    Service: Army
                    sigpic
                    R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Gary Ivan Gordon
                      Date of birth: 30 Aug. 1960
                      Place of birth: Lincoln, Maine
                      Home of record: Lincoln, Maine



                      Medal of Honor Awarded for actions during the United Nations Operations in Somalia II

                      For actions above and beyond the call of duty on 3 October 1993, while serving as Sniper Team Leader, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia, in support of Operation RSTORE HOPE. Master Sergeant Gordon's sniper team provided precision fires from the lead helicopter during an assault and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. When Master Sergeant Gordon learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the second crash site, he and another sniper unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After his third request to be inserted, Master Sergeant Gordon received permission to perform his volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Master Sergeant Gordon was inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon and his fellow sniper, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Master Sergeant Gordon immediately pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Master Sergeant Gordon used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers until he depleted his ammunition. Master Sergeant Gordon then went back to the wreckage, recovering some of the crew's weapons and ammunition. Despite the fact that he was critically low on ammunition, he provided some of it to the dazed pilot and then radioed for help. Master Sergeant Gordon continued to travel the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. After his team member was fatally wounded and his own rifle ammunition exhausted, Master Sergeant Gordon returned to the wreckage, recovering a rifle with the last five rounds of ammunition and gave it to the pilot with the words, "good luck." Then, armed only with his pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon continued to fight until he was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot's life. Master Sergeant Gordon's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon, his unit and the United States Army. Gary Ivan Gordon

                      Service: Army

                      Rank: Master Sergeant
                      sigpic
                      R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thomas Joseph McMahon
                        Date of birth: 24 June 1948
                        Place of birth: Washington, D.C.
                        Home of record: Portland, Maine



                        Medal of Honor Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

                        For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as an Aid Man with Company A, 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiment, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Quang Tin Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 18 March 1969. When the lead elements of his company came under heavy fire from well-fortified enemy positions, three soldiers fell seriously wounded. Specialist Fourth Class McMahon, with complete disregard for his safety, left his covered position and ran through intense enemy fire to the side of one of the wounded, administered first aid and then carried him to safety. He returned through the hail of fire to the side of a second wounded man. Although painfully wounded by an exploding mortar round while returning the wounded man to a secure position, Specialist Fourth Class McMahon refused medical attention and heroically ran back through the heavy enemy fire toward his remaining wounded comrade. He fell mortally wounded before he could rescue the last man. Specialist Fourth Class McMahon's undaunted concern for the welfare of his comrades at the cost of his life are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the United States Army. Thomas Joseph McMahon

                        Service: Army

                        General Orders No. 46, August 28, 1970
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                        R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                        Comment


                        • #13
                          double post....changed it
                          Last edited by Ndnsoldierboy; 09-17-2009, 10:08 AM. Reason: DOUBLE POST
                          sigpic
                          R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Monti’s parents, Paul Monti of Raynham, Mass., and Janet Monti, of Winterville, N.C., will join President Barack Obama at 2:05 p.m. in the East Room of the White House for the ceremony


                            Sgt. 1st Class Monti, 30, was assigned to 3rd Squadron, 71st Cavalry, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, when he was killed in Afghanistan.

                            He was a staff sergeant at the time of the engagement in Afghanistan and was the assistant leader for a 16-man patrol tasked with conducting surveillance in the Gowardesh region in Nuristan province.

                            The soldiers’ mission was to provide current intelligence, interdict enemy movement and ensure early warning for the squadron’s main effort as it moved into the province.

                            As nightfall approached, the patrol was attacked by a well-organized enemy force of at least 60 personnel. Outnumbered four to one, Monti’s patrol was in danger of being overrun because enemy fighters had established two support-by-fire positions directly above the patrol in a densely wooded ridgeline, the article said.

                            Monti immediately returned fire and ordered the patrol to seek cover and return fire. He then reached for his radio headset and calmly made calls for indirect fire and close-air support, both dangerously close to the patrol’s position. He did this while simultaneously directing the patrol’s fires.

                            When he realized that a member of the patrol, Pfc. Brian J. Bradbury, had been critically wounded and was exposed 10 meters from cover, Monti advanced through enemy fire to within three feet of Bradbury’s position. He was forced back by intense fire from rocket-propelled grenades; he tried again but was again forced back. On the third try, the remaining soldiers coordinated cover fires, but this time, after only a few steps, Monti was cut down and mortally wounded by an RPG.

                            Staff Sgt. Patrick L. Lybert was also killed in the attack, and Bradbury died with medic Staff Sgt. Heathe Craig when the helicopter hoist that was lifting them to the aircraft near the attack site broke.


                            Climb To Glory! To The Top!
                            R.I.P. Bro...
                            sigpic
                            R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                            Comment


                            • #15
                              John Earl Warren Jr.
                              Date of birth: 16 Nov. 1946
                              Place of birth: Brooklyn, N.Y.
                              Home of record: New York, N.Y.


                              Medal of Honor


                              For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty at the cost of his life while serving as a platoon leader with Company C (Mechanized), 2d Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces at Tay Ninh Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 14 January 1969. While moving through a rubber plantation to reinforce another friendly unit, Company C came under intense fire from a well-fortified enemy force. Disregarding his safety, First Lieutenant Warren with several of his men began maneuvering through the hail of enemy fire toward the hostile positions. When he had come to within six feet of one of the enemy bunkers and was preparing to toss a hand grenade into it, an enemy grenade was suddenly thrown into the middle of his small group. Thinking only of his men, First Lieutenant Warren fell in the direction of the grenade, thus shielding those around him from the blast. His action, performed at the cost of his life, saved three men from serious or mortal injury. First Lieutenant Warren's ultimate action of sacrifice to save the lives of his men was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army. John Earl Warren Jr.

                              Service: Army Reserve

                              General Orders No. 49, September 8, 1970

                              There is a barracks at Fort Drum, NY (10th MTN DIV) named after this soldier. I, at one time in my career stayed in those barracks.
                              sigpic
                              R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





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                                Navy Cross presented to Vietnam-era Marine
                                by Ndnsoldierboy
                                Navy Cross presented to Vietnam-era Marine

                                Lance Cpl. Ned Seath was recognized for valor 45 years after saving his comrades from oncoming North Vietnamese soldiers; he also received a Bronze Star with ‘V’ device for previous actions
                                By James K. Sanborn - Staff writer
                                ...
                                02-12-2011, 10:17 AM

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