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  • (American) Unknown Soldier of the Korean War


    Medal of Honor


    AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
    DURING Korean War

    Service: Army



    GENERAL ORDERS:

    Approved August 31, 1957, Public Law 85-25, Eighty-fifth Congress


    CITATION:

    The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to (American) Unknown Soldier of the Korean War, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. AN ACT TO authorize the President to award the Medal of Honor to the unknown American who lost his life while serving overseas in the Armed Forces of the United States during the Korean War. Be it enacted by the Senate and the House of Representatives of the United States of America assembled, That the President is hereby authorized and directed to award, in the name of Congress, a Medal of Honor to the unknown American who lost his life while serving overseas in the Armed Forces of the United States during the Korean War, and who will lie buried in the Memorial Amphitheater of the National Cemetery at Arlington, Virginia, as authorized by the Act of 3 August 1956, Public Law 975, Eighty-fourth Congress.
    Attached Files
    sigpic
    R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





    Comment


    • Bruce Alan Grandstaff


      DATE OF BIRTH: June 2, 1934

      PLACE OF BIRTH:

      Spokane, Washington

      HOME OF RECORD:

      Spokane, Washington



      Medal of Honor


      AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
      DURING Vietnam War

      Service: Army

      Battalion: 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment

      Division: 4th Infantry Division


      GENERAL ORDERS:

      Department of the Army, General Orders No. 52 (August 8, 1967)



      CITATION:

      The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Platoon Sergeant Bruce Alan Grandstaff (ASN: RA-56240242), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Pleiku Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 18 May 1967. Platoon Sergeant Grandstaff distinguished himself while leading the Weapons Platoon, Company B, on a reconnaissance mission near the Cambodian border. His platoon was advancing through intermittent enemy contact when it was struck by heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire from three sides. As he established a defensive perimeter, Platoon Sergeant Grandstaff noted that several of his men had been struck down. He raced 30 meters through the intense fire to aid them but could only save one. Denied freedom to maneuver his unit by the intensity of the enemy onslaught, he adjusted artillery to within 45 meters of his position. When helicopter gunships arrived, he crawled outside the defensive position to mark the location with smoke grenades. Realizing his first marker was probably ineffective, he crawled to another location and threw his last smoke grenade but the smoke did not penetrate the jungle foliage. Seriously wounded in the leg during this effort he returned to his radio and, refusing medical aid, adjusted the artillery even closer as the enemy advanced on his position. Recognizing the need for additional firepower, he again braved the enemy fusillade, crawled to the edge of his position and fired several magazines of tracer ammunition through the jungle canopy. He succeeded in designating the location to the gunships but this action again drew the enemy fire and he was wounded in the other leg. Now enduring intense pain and bleeding profusely, he crawled to within ten meters of an enemy machinegun which had caused many casualties among his men. He destroyed the position with hand grenades but received additional wounds. Rallying his remaining men to withstand the enemy assaults, he realized his position was being overrun and asked for artillery directly on his location. He fought until mortally wounded by an enemy rocket. Although every man in the platoon was a casualty, survivors attest to the indomitable spirit and exceptional courage of this outstanding combat leader who inspired his men to fight courageously against overwhelming odds and cost the enemy heavy casualties. Platoon Sergeant Grandstaff's selfless gallantry, above and beyond the call of duty, are in the highest traditions of the U.S. Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.
      Attached Files
      sigpic
      R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





      Comment


      • George Everett "Bud" Day

        DATE OF BIRTH: February 24, 1925

        PLACE OF BIRTH:

        Sioux City, Iowa

        HOME OF RECORD:

        Sioux City, Iowa

        Colonel "Bud" Day served 30 months in the South Pacific during WW II as an enlisted member with the US Marine Corps. He served as an Army reservist, and Army guardsman between WW II and Korea, and then in the Air Force during the Vietnam War (3 different services over the span of 3 different wars.) After being shot down on August 26, 1967, and serving 7 years in captivity, Colonel Day was repatriated in 1973. He is the only man to earn BOTH the Medal of Honor and the Air Force Cross. A recipient of virtually every other available combat decoration, he is widely considered the most decorated Airman in history. His autobiography is titled "Return With Honor" and he later expanded upon that book in a second autobiography titled "Duty, Honor, Country."


        Medal of Honor

        AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
        DURING Vietnam War

        Service: Air Force

        Battalion: Misty Super FAC's F-100 Squadron

        Division: Prisoner of War (North Vietnam)

        GENERAL ORDERS:

        GB-180, March 22, 1976

        CITATION:
        The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Colonel [then Major] George Everett "Bud" Day (AFSN: 0-49555), United States Air Force, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty a Pilot of Misty Super FAC's F-100 Squadron, held as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam. On 26 August 1967, Colonel Day was forced to eject from his aircraft over North Vietnam when it was hit by ground fire. His right arm was broken in three places, and his left knee was badly sprained. He was immediately captured by hostile forces and taken to a prison camp where he was interrogated and severely tortured. After causing the guards to relax their vigilance, Colonel Day escaped into the jungle and began the trek toward South Vietnam. Despite injuries inflicted by fragments of a bomb or rocket, he continued southward surviving only on a few berries and uncooked frogs. He successfully evaded enemy patrols and reached the Ben Hai River, where he encountered U.S. artillery barrages. With the aid of a bamboo log float, Colonel Day swam across the river and entered the demilitarized zone. Due to delirium, he lost his sense of direction and wandered aimlessly for several days. After several unsuccessful attempts to signal U.S. aircraft, he was ambushed and recaptured by the Viet Cong, sustaining gunshot wounds to his left hand and thigh. He was returned to the prison from which he had escaped and later was moved to Hanoi after giving his captors false information to questions put before him. Physically, Colonel Day was totally debilitated and unable to perform even the simplest task for himself. Despite his many injuries, he continued to offer maximum resistance. His personal bravery in the face of deadly enemy pressure was significant in saving the lives of fellow aviators who were still flying against the enemy. Colonel Day's conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Air Force and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Armed Forces.
        Attached Files
        sigpic
        R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





        Comment


        • Charles Edward Pope



          DATE OF BIRTH: June 2, 1928


          HOME OF RECORD:

          Kalispell, Montana


          AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION:


          Navy Cross


          AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
          DURING Korean War

          Service: Navy

          Division: 1st Marine Division (Reinforced)

          GENERAL ORDERS:


          CITATION:

          The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Hospital Corpsman Third Class Charles Edward Pope (NSN: 5550552), United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a Marine infantry company of the FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea on 22 February 1953. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Pope displayed incredible courage and devotion to duty. He was a member of a combat patrol operating far forward of the main line of resistance when it was subjected to murderous hostile mortar and artillery fire and several casualties were sustained. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously traversed the entire area rendering first aid to his injured comrades. Although painfully wounded during the initial phase of the action, he gallantly disregarded his condition and continued his intrepid movements. Ignoring suggestions to take cover and despite his weakened condition, he never faltered in his devotion to his comrades. While moving forward to aid a stricken Marine, he collapsed, mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Pope's unparalleled display of courage together with his selfless devotion to his comrades served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
          Attached Files
          sigpic
          R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





          Comment


          • Elizabeth N. Jacobson


            DATE OF BIRTH: 26-Mar-84

            PLACE OF BIRTH:

            Orlando, Florida

            HOME OF RECORD:

            Florida



            Bronze Star

            AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
            DURING Global War on Terror

            Service: Air Force

            Rank: Airman First Class

            Division: 386th Air Expeditionary Wing, United States Central Command Air Forces

            GENERAL ORDERS:


            CITATION:

            The President of the United States of America, authorized by Executive Order 11046, 24 August 1962, takes pride in presenting the Bronze Star Medal (Posthumously) to Airman First Class Elizabeth N. Jacobson, United States Air Force, for meritorious achievement as a Gun Truck Crew Served Weapons Operator for Convoy Operations, 586th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron, 386th Expeditionary Mission Support Group, 386th Air Expeditionary Wing, United States Central Command Air Forces, while engaged in ground operations against an opposing armed force at Camp Bucca, Iraq on 28 September 2005. On that date while providing lead security on a convoy mission to Navistar on the border of Iraq and Kuwait, her vehicle was struck by an Improvised Explosive Device. Airman Jacobson gave her life in the defense of our nation and for the Freedom of the people of Iraq. By her heroic actions and unselfish dedication to duty in the service of her country, Airman Jacobson has reflected great credit upon herself and the United States Air Force.
            Attached Files
            sigpic
            R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





            Comment


            • Ronald J. Shurer


              DATE OF BIRTH: December 7, 1978

              PLACE OF BIRTH:

              Fairbanks, Alaska

              HOME OF RECORD:

              Spokane, Washington



              AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION:


              Medal of Honor


              AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
              DURING Global War on Terror

              Service: Army

              Division: 1st Special Forces

              GENERAL ORDERS:


              CITATION:

              The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Staff Sergeant Ronald J. Shurer, II, United States Army. Staff Sergeant Shurer distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty on April 6, 2008, while serving as a Senior Medical Sergeant, Special Forces Operational Detachment Alpha 3336, Special Operations Task Force-33, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Staff Sergeant Shurer was part of an assault element inserted by helicopter into a location in Afghanistan. As the assault element moved up a near vertical mountain toward its objective, it was engaged by fierce enemy machine gun, sniper, and rocket-propelled grenade fire. The lead portion of the assault element, which included the ground commander, sustained several casualties and became pinned down on the mountainside. Staff Sergeant Shurer and the rest of the trailing portion of the assault element were likewise engaged by enemy machine gun, sniper, and rocket-propelled grenade fire. As the attack intensified, Staff Sergeant Shurer braved enemy fire to move to an injured Soldier and treat his wounds. Having stabilized the injured Soldier, Staff Sergeant Shurer then learned of the casualties among the lead element. Staff Sergeant Shurer fought his way up the mountainside, under intense enemy fire, to the lead element’s location. Upon reaching the lead element, he treated and stabilized two more Soldiers. Finishing those lifesaving efforts, Staff Sergeant Shurer noticed two additional severely wounded Soldiers under intense enemy fire. The bullet that had wounded one of these Soldiers had also impacted Staff Sergeant Shurer’s helmet. With complete disregard for his own life, Staff Sergeant Shurer again moved through enemy fire to treat and stabilize one Soldier’s severely wounded arm. Shortly thereafter, Staff Sergeant Shurer continued to brave withering enemy fire to get to the other Soldier’s location in order to treat his lower leg, which had been almost completely severed by a high-caliber sniper round. After treating the Soldier, Staff Sergeant Shurer began to evacuate the wounded; carrying and lowering them down the sheer mountainside. While moving down the mountain, Staff Sergeant Shurer used his own body to shield the wounded from enemy fire and debris caused by danger-close air strikes. Reaching the base of the mountain, Staff Sergeant Shurer set up a casualty collection point and continued to treat the wounded. With the arrival of the medical evacuation helicopter, Staff Sergeant Shurer, again under enemy fire, helped load the wounded into the helicopter. Having ensured the safety of the wounded, Staff Sergeant Shurer then regained control of his commando squad and rejoined the fight. He continued to lead his troops and emplace security elements until it was time to move to the evacuation landing zone for the helicopter. Staff Sergeant Shurer’s actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan, Special Operations Command Central, and the United States Army.
              Attached Files
              sigpic
              R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





              Comment


              • Ernest Edwin "Chief" Evans


                DATE OF BIRTH: August 13, 1908

                PLACE OF BIRTH:

                Pawnee, Oklahoma

                HOME OF RECORD:

                Pawnee, Oklahoma


                Ernest Evans graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Class of 1931.



                AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION:


                Medal of Honor

                AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
                DURING World War II

                Service: Navy

                Division: U.S.S. Johnston (DD-557)

                GENERAL ORDERS:



                CITATION:

                The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Commander Ernest Edwin "Chief" Evans (NSN: 0-70042), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. JOHNSTON (DD-557) in action against major units of the enemy Japanese fleet during the battle off Samar on 25 October 1944. The first to lay a smokescreen and to open fire as an enemy task force, vastly superior in number, firepower and armor, rapidly approached. Commander Evans gallantly diverted the powerful blasts of hostile guns from the lightly armed and armored carriers under his protection, launching the first torpedo attack when the JOHNSTON came under straddling Japanese shellfire. Undaunted by damage sustained under the terrific volume of fire, he unhesitatingly joined others of his group to provide fire support during subsequent torpedo attacks against the Japanese and, out-shooting and outmaneuvering the enemy as he consistently interposed his vessel between the hostile fleet units and our carriers despite the crippling loss of engine power and communications with steering aft, shifted command to the fantail, shouted steering orders through an open hatch to men turning the rudder by hand and battled furiously until the JOHNSTON, burning and shuddering from a mortal blow, lay dead in the water after three hours of fierce combat. Seriously wounded early in the engagement, Commander Evans, by his indomitable courage and brilliant professional skill, aided materially in turning back the enemy during a critical phase of the action. His valiant fighting spirit throughout this historic battle will venture as an inspiration to all who served with him.
                Attached Files
                sigpic
                R.I.P. my Bros from the 1st MAR DIV, 3rd MAR DIV, 25th I.D., 10th MTN DIV, V Corps, 170th IBCT who gave their lives in the Cold War, Marines we lost in Korea during Team Spirit '89 & Okinawa '89- bodies never recovered, Panama, 1st Gulf War, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iraq...





                Comment

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