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  • Information about attending pow wows

    Hello,

    I am not native anything, but I am interested in native culture (from everywhere) and want to expose my children to all the diversity that is out there. As I am in living in the States for the next couple of years I figured pow wows were a good place to start. So, do I just pick out a pow wow from the calender and turn up? Can anyone guide me on what would be a good 'first' pow wow to attend? I am grateful for advice that anyone can give me. I live in the Inland Empire, Southern California,

    Cheers Kirsty

  • #2
    Originally posted by Kirtos
    Hello,

    So, do I just pick out a pow wow from the calender and turn up? Cheers Kirsty
    Most powwows are spectator friendly. I'd pick a powwow in your area and call the contact person listed. Ask if spectators are welcome. Before going, be sure to read the info in the "Powwow Etiquette" tab on this site. When you get there, be respectful but be sure to ask questions. If the MC announces an "intertribal" this means you are welcome to dance, even if you're not wearing dance clothes. Give it a try. Be sure to have fun.
    Ron

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    • #3
      Thanks

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't know how far north Redlands, is but along with powwows in N. Cal there are several powwows throughout the year in SW Oregon, such as the Klamath Falls area, Rogue Valley, Grants Pass area, etc.

        How welcome you are at a powwow is largely affected by your behavior. I like people who come for the right reasons to celebrate our culture with us; but I am kinda bothered by people who act like we are some kind of living museum exhibit.

        Ron S gave you good advice!
        "Friends don't let friends drink decaf..."
        Wakalapi's $49 unlimited phone service www.49deal.com

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        • #5
          Try contacting the larger Universities in your area. Many of them (especially here in California) have either a American Indian Studies department or a Student Group who could provide more information on public powwows if you asked them nicely.

          Please do consider reading articles about and applying the proper etiquitte BEFORE attending. Sometimes the most well intnetioned folks are the ones who unknowingly commit the biggest blunders at our gatherings.

          Kind Regards, Sa Mi
          Because of our treaty status, the distinction of being 'Cherokee' is a status of citizenship, not a racial issue.

          Comment


          • #6
            Two

            2+2=

            20060620 forgot chair.
            Last edited by pdx00782; 07-27-2006, 08:45 PM. Reason: test of EDIT 20060607

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            • #7
              All of this is good advice. If you want to expose your children to other cultures, go to your states webpage and see if they have festivals listed statewide and for your area. I know Cali has a great Highlands games which is Scottish culture, and I'm sure they have others as well. You can probably find Greek, Asian and India festivals also for your family to enjoy and learn more about.
              Courage is just fear that has said it's prayers.

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              • #8
                hi

                Remember to bring a lawn chair to sit on and some sunscreen (this is California). Once you taste some frybread or the indian tacos you will be glad that you brought some zip lock bags to take some home! (gallon size- one for each frybread) Plan to stay all day (stay more then a few hours) ...browse the shops and you will be sure to find items that are rarely found in stores.

                Consider that there will be opportunites to donate cash (such as to honor the veterans,etc) The mc announces it. there will be other times to donate also for other reasons. Some powwows have raffles or 50/50 drawings...takes cash to buy into that those also.

                Keep in mind that clock time is a rough estimate...sit back and relax.

                Each pow wow is unique...never the exact same...so go to more then just one if you have time.
                I love that song, let's turn the music up!


                Smilies is not my 1st Language

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                • #9
                  All of this is very good info. I would just add, Please don't go and sit on the benches that the dancers sit on. As was mentioned either bring your own chairs or use seating (if available) provided by the Committee.

                  Come expecting to just have loads of fun, and stay all day. Remember that the reffles and other donations are there to help the committee pay for the powwow.
                  BOB

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                  • #10
                    Powwow First timer

                    Kirtos,

                    When I go I bring a rolling cooler with ice, water, and food stuffs (I'm diabetic) plus blankets and/or folding chairs, sunscreen, etc. Call the Contact and ask if there is a Children's Program (usually on Friday) which is a couple of hours geared just for the kids. It's absolutely wonderful.
                    They teach everyone, adults and kids, Powwow ettiquette and have activities to teach and entain them.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by pdx00782
                      2+2=

                      20060620 forgot chair
                      ----
                      WHAT? a hassel
                      ==
                      http://web.pdx.edu/~pdx00782/
                      ;
                      click X for forum.
                      Last edited by pdx00782; 07-27-2006, 08:46 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Also, be very careful outdoors in the current heatwave. Once you get used to the heat, it is still hotter than you think. Many of the dancers under all that leather and beadwork are actually very athletic and are used to these conditions, plus they usually have lots of bottled water and Gatorade/Powerade at their disposal. Do the same! Bring lots of sweat-replacing beverages and wear a chilled, moist towel over the back of your neck. Visit some medical websites and weather websites and review information about heat related illnesses and emergencies.
                        "Friends don't let friends drink decaf..."
                        Wakalapi's $49 unlimited phone service www.49deal.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by pdx00782
                          ----
                          WHAT? a hassel
                          ==
                          http://web.pdx.edu/~pdx00782/
                          ;
                          click X for forum

                          20060726 the forum is back and the link above May work today.
                          Last edited by pdx00782; 07-27-2006, 08:46 PM.

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