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Gourd Dance, Dying? Or resurgance?

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  • Shawl Lady
    replied
    Hey that's great to hear -- about the increased numbers of Gourd Dancers at pow wows around the country.

    Thanks for giving your comments. I have met some members from the 4 corners area (Navajo) Gourd Dance Society. That sure surprised me, but they were just like the Oklahoma ones I know. These days more people are of mixed Native American tribal heritage. I am meeting people who have apache, pawnee, yaki and navajo heritage or other combinations. That's quite a mix! Hard to choose which one to pursue for dance regalia and learning songs and the old customs and traditions. Hey but that's good too -- learning something about them all.

    As long as we can sing our songs, make our art, follow our spiritual and medicine beliefs, and use our language, the future looks much better for the generations ahead.

    Leave a comment:


  • WhoMe
    replied
    Shawl lady and Bullcreekldy:

    Continue to strive for knowledge of what is respectable and rightious. "Anything that is worthwhile takes time."

    Now back to the original question of dying out or resurgeance . ..

    New songs are composed every year to add to the gourd dance genre.

    The Navaho now claim to have their own gourd dance societies. At a recent "all gourd dance" in Gallup, there were 92 gourd dancers. They now even compose their own songs.

    More "southern" powwows from Cali to FL. are including the gourd dance as a part of their program.

    At this year's Kiowa Gourd Clan there were over 140 dressed male gourd dancers.

    My vote is "the gourd dance is as strong as ever!"

    Leave a comment:


  • BullcreekLdy
    replied
    Shawl Lady,
    I thank you for your kind word and your blessing. My the creator bless all you do, and leave you with nothing but joy in your heart.

    Leave a comment:


  • kiowawarrior31
    replied
    yeah

    .
    Last edited by kiowawarrior31; 04-16-2008, 01:42 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shawl Lady
    replied
    Well, yes it makes sense that a caring person would get discouraged at what senseless fools do to innocent children, criticizing them or putting them down.

    Our children and grandchildren are our future. We must make sure they are taught the traditions, the right way of living in harmony with the Creator and all his creatures, that all our natural world has spirits which are to be respected, that we must learn our tribal customs, languages, stories, dances, arts, history and music and keep it alive, keep it going through them.

    We have come dangerously close to losing ALL of our precious Native American knowledge and wisdom, spirituality, langauges, and traditions, long kept hidden and secret from the world. Now is the time to light the fires of knowledge, to pass on the old ways of healing, living, caring for others, art and music forms, stories and history and to light that precious fire in our young ones. Now that its cool to be ndn, there are no barriers to bringing back into the light all of the wisdom and old ways -- it is the only way we can ALL heal, and the only way we can heal Mother Earth. This I firmly believe.

    So, never give up. Keep trying. Help one person. That person will help another, and so on. Keep the circle of life going because we are all connected. It is the way our Creator meant for us to be.

    Blessings on you and your family. May you walk in sunlight with smiles on your faces and dance on the soft grass with joy. May your dreams be filled with good and helpful spirits bringing messages to lead you farther along on this good Red Path. May you sing the old songs proudly and loudly. May you stand tall and hold your head high, as the Creator made you to be.

    Aho.

    Leave a comment:


  • BullcreekLdy
    replied
    Shawl lady,
    I need to thank you for your kind words of advice. I am learning to keep trying it was hard, and actually I am happy now at least with my life. I am afraid for others though,I mean I am one person, and im not stupid or even oblivious, I know that I cant help a lot of people but my goal is to do a lot to help one person. sometimes I get discouraged though especially when I see little kids being critisized for learning. does that make any sense?

    Leave a comment:


  • Shawl Lady
    replied
    Bullcreeklady - I know what you are saying, and have experienced the "you don't look Indian" response from some people. But you shouldn't let them stop you. Keep making contact with others, talk to people at pow wows about your concerns. You will find the person or group that wants to help you. Don't give up!

    Once people see that your heart is good, that you are sincere, and that you do have tribal heritage, they will help and welcome you into their circle. It just takes time, especially when you have not been raised in a Native American community.

    Think of all the hurting, alienated urban Indians in our country -- sick at heart, sick in body, or sick in mind, because they don't have their tribal connection. They were never taught the right way, or their language, customs, spiritual beliefs, or anything. They only feel that they don't fit in anywhere. Many are addicted to alcohol or drugs and some get help through Indian rehab programs like Native Directions. Those are the lucky ones because they finally do find what they need to heal and be strong. They find their way on the Red Path. Many of them, in turn, reach out to help others to heal, get strong, and find the Red Path.

    I see this in the work being done at 3 Rivers Indian Lodge in California. There are places like this everywhere, but you have to ask and look. There are county and state health and mental health services, which also can network you to other groups for the help you seek. There are Indian job placement agencies and cultural centers. Many colleges now even teach Native American languages. I found a wealth of information on that just doing a simple search on the internet.

    Another way is to contact your local tribal council or group and tell your story to them. If you have tried before, try again and talk to someone else. Make them know you are determined to find your people and of your concerns for the younger generation. You will find the person or persons who will listen and help you.

    I talk too much. I wish you well and hope you will get the help you seek soon. Aho!

    Leave a comment:


  • BullcreekLdy
    replied
    bob,
    I have already moved on so to speak, I appreciate your advice,truthfully, I am ok, i have family outside the native community who give more strength than you can imagine. But truthfullyat this point I am worried about the younger ones who havent learned to keep their back straight and keep working. Ya know? Those are the ones we need to help. I was older when I got involved, and like I said I have famly wh taught me to be strong and hold myself proud, I was very fortunate. But what about young ones who dont have those benefits?? I dont know I dont think this is making any sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shawl Lady
    replied
    Sunday at the 3 Rivers Pow Wow turned out better than the first 2 days. I got to Gourd Dance and had my husband present. They honored him by wearing his Silver Star with oak leaf cluster ribbon from Viet Nam for us. I also got in plenty of intertribal dancing with some young newcomers and good friends too. Everyone had fun, as the high was only 87 and we had a nice breeze. We made some new friends and visited with old friends.

    I also got raffle duty and we gave away about 16 nice items.

    The most fun part was watch a thing called Team Dancing where 3 competitors teamed up and danced in unison and made up some pretty clever steps together. It was really cool to watch and the crowd loved it.

    We all went home hot tired and happy. It was a very good day.

    Leave a comment:


  • CHEROSAGE
    replied
    Sounds like a good time, enjoy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shawl Lady
    replied
    Thanks for your kind words, Bob. The Gourd Dancing went well on Sat. We had more than 20 Gourd Dancers and a few ladies too. The Gourd Dancers were local, and some from other states. It got mighty hot (90 at noon) and water was brought around often. Here we pass out individual cold bottled water, instead of passing 'round the bucket and ladle. Some people are leery of the bucket and ladle, I hear.

    As a 3 Rivers Lodge Board member, I was called on to assist with the presentation to the group of Elders we were honoring, both men and women Elders. We gave out beautiful framed certificates of appreciation, a blanket for each man, a shawl for each woman, a bundle of white sage and a packet of tobacco. It was a lovely ceremony.

    Other than those 2 events, I was pretty busy at our information booth, selling CD's and tee shirts and giving important information like where is the snowcone booth and where can I set up my chairs. Some older graduates of our rehab program stopped by and that was very cool.

    By mid-afternoon was 95 and the place was packed with visitors, dancers, vendors, campers, volunteers, news people and whatnot. It was a hot chaotic afternoon. Other than the morning Gourd Dance I didn't get to dance. Too busy! Then went home to get my husband for the evening session, but he was feeling sick. So I stayed home to look after him.

    We are going this morning when it's cool.

    Aho!



    :)

    Leave a comment:


  • CHEROSAGE
    replied
    This is great news. I hope and pray that you have a fun time. Sorry to hear that your husband has a hard time in the heat. Perhaps he can dance at a dinner dance or some dance when the weather cooperates. Have fun and enjoy yourself, this is the utmost important part of the dance.

    Good luck and congratulations on your acceptance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shawl Lady
    replied
    I appreciate reading everyone's comments about Gourd Dancing.

    Yesterday I dressed out and went to our local pow wow, just to do volunteer work. I talked to everyone there -- vendors, staff, visitors, greeted them all to our pow wow. Part of my job on the Board of Directors for 3 Rivers Indian Lodge is to serve on welcoming committees at events, to talk to people about 3 Rivers, and to sell our CD's and tee shirts as a fundraiser. So I had fun visiting with old friends and making new ones yestersay.

    I have been passing the word, quietly, I was interested in groud dancing. On Friday afternoon I had a wonderful surprise. I was told I would be invited into our local gourd dance society, and since I have no male kin members to bring me in, they will pay my way in. They will also do an honor dance for my disabled vet husband today. I am overwhelmed with joy and honored that I am being accepted in this way.

    For me, the Gourd Dance is the best part of the pow wow. Perhaps it is fond memories of dances I went to in Oklahoma, and also because I admire and support what the Gourd Dancers do.
    Since I have no male kin as a member, I am adopting the local group as they are adopting me. It is a happy day!

    By the way, my disabled husband can't be out in the heat, as he quickly gets heat exhaustion (it happened at the last 2 pow wows, one required a trip by ambulance to the ER 20 miles away). He usually goes to events in a wheelchair now and only when it is cool enough for him. He will go this evening for our Traditional Dinner and for the evening dance session.

    I will be dancing for joy today! He is proud of me for dressing out and dancing, and for my commitment to 3 Rivers Indian Lodge. He knows I do it for him, for his healing, as well as for my own healing of spirit.

    Aho!

    Leave a comment:


  • CHEROSAGE
    replied
    Thanks ShawlLady. I know some Indian Vets that participate in their wheel chair. I don't know if your husband is able or not but this may be a solution. You can dance right with him to assist him as needed. I don't think much would be said about this if you dance just off to his back and side. I think your heart is in the right way. Just find the right tutors to be friends with.

    BullcreekLdy: What you say is pretty much the way it is sorry to say. BUT, I think it is still possible to get the help you need. Keep going to the events in your area, talk to Indian elders respectfully. Make friends with the people in your age group with no strings attached. I do believe that these Indian people will warm up to you and trust you. You must help yourself too. Watch and learn, listen to these Indian elders comments. Compare what your contemporary friends share with you and what you observe about the things these people that do know give back to you. They will give you their info through body language, their comments to each other, and to you. I know it is not easy to get into the our group, especially if you don't necessarily look Inidan. Good luck, and keep the faith. Don't give up.

    Leave a comment:


  • BullcreekLdy
    replied
    Bob,
    That may be there are a lot of newagers Ill admit that. But what about those of us who one were to shy to ask fo help. Or in my situation, was blown off because I look white and people automatically assume I am asking because I want to act indian. And dont say that I am making assumtions people flat out told me that they didnt feel a white girl needed to act indian. that was why I stopped. it was only when I got involved with people who were previously labeled "new" and "inexperianced" in the native world. Only when I got involved with them was i taught anything. I dont know Im rambling but its different for men. I hate to say it but a lot of women are catty and witchy especially if we feel our territory is being invaded on if you get my meaning. I dont know Im rambling so I will stop now

    Leave a comment:

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