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rag for grass regalia

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  • rag for grass regalia

    who knows what type of rag you use that doesn't fray for grass regalia?? I'm thinkin cotton not spandex
    love me tender, love me true

  • #2
    Originally posted by nena View Post
    who knows what type of rag you use that doesn't fray for grass regalia?? I'm thinkin cotton not spandex
    I know I'm old school, but I hate the current fashion of using raggedy cloth. Yarn is still much nicer looking & more traditional. If you want something wide, order wide grosgrain ribbon from an online supplier, or use something that doesn't look like your dog chewed on it. Just my opinion...
    Janet Littlecrow
    Littlecrow Trading Post, LLC
    www.littlecrowtradingpost.com

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    • #3
      Yarn is not "more" traditional.

      Yarn became poplular in the 80's. Prior to that chainette fringe was popular.

      People have used whatever materials are available.

      I have pictures of my boy's great Grandfathers wearing rags in the 50's and 60's.

      Styles are ever evolving and materials change with time as dancers strive to create a look that catches people's attention.

      Broadcloth is the most common rag material.

      1. Either cut it with pinking shears or

      2. snip and rip the cloth so that it splits between threads. If you snip and rip then you will need to pull out the loose threads. I usually do this before use and after first use. Once the all the loose threads are snipped out the remaining fringe doesn't really fray after that.

      If you cut with regular scissors....you will end up with lots of fraying that is difficult to make neat.

      Disclaimer: The above is just what I have seen and learned and of course, I know absolutely nothing so don't listen to me.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jed View Post
        Yarn is not "more" traditional.

        Yarn became poplular in the 80's. Prior to that chainette fringe was popular.

        People have used whatever materials are available.

        I have pictures of my boy's great Grandfathers wearing rags in the 50's and 60's.

        Styles are ever evolving and materials change with time as dancers strive to create a look that catches people's attention.

        Broadcloth is the most common rag material.

        1. Either cut it with pinking shears or

        2. snip and rip the cloth so that it splits between threads. If you snip and rip then you will need to pull out the loose threads. I usually do this before use and after first use. Once the all the loose threads are snipped out the remaining fringe doesn't really fray after that.

        If you cut with regular scissors....you will end up with lots of fraying that is difficult to make neat.

        Disclaimer: The above is just what I have seen and learned and of course, I know absolutely nothing so don't listen to me.
        I totally I agree about the yarn and appreciate the reply for rag, I have also heard about the no fray stuff that can also be used on the edges. I prefer ribbon or the chainette fringe, but wanted to try the rag, so thanks for the suggestions, I will try that.
        love me tender, love me true

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        • #5
          the old men that danced grass when I was young, they had rag fringe. Mostly gramma would say because they used whatever was available. I like the way it looks better than the yarn too..mostly because it brings memories of those old men.

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          • #6
            I like a mix of yarn, fringe, and cloth strategically arranged. Likewise, I think it should be simple enough to move well while wearing.

            Since we sing to lift others up, likewise we dance to help others (i.e. spectators) feel good when they watch.

            I say, whatever compliments your dancing style, body type, personality and looks snazzy!
            Last edited by ajibik; 02-01-2010, 07:24 AM. Reason: spellin'
            Big Pauly, Anishinaabe Ogitchidaa Aanikoominodewiwin

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            • #7
              It depends.

              You can't really say how long it takes to make an outfit. You can spend as little or as much time as you want on it, and the time it takes can vary from a couple of days to a year or more, depending on bead work, accessories and how intricate your designs are.
              Niin sa, Chi anung

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