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  • Stomp dance?

    I have read someplace that the Stomp Dance originates in the south-east, but is there not a more northern version of the dance as well? Danced by the Ojibwe and other tribes around there? If so, could someone describe it me? x

  • #2
    I live up around 'nishnabes and they look confused when I mention going back home for stomps.
    Not sure what you mean by something like stomp dancing- there are different types of southeastern dances that could all be classified as stomp, or broken down to be more specific.
    They might could have some dances that have the same names, but heck lotsa folks have dances with the same names (deer, bear, snake, fish etc..) but they have nothing to do with one another. And sometimes these are ceremonial and so are especially unrelated to each other.
    If you are relying on books this may be a case where some anthro got their wire crossed and then wrote it down like it was good.

    Also, stomp dancing is not pow-wow dancing- don't get 'em confused.
    Last edited by legalstraight; 11-04-2008, 06:04 PM. Reason: left this last bit out

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    • #3
      I know there's a Stomp Dance song from up north, but it's probably unrelated then to the dance in the south. It's probably me getting my wires crossed? So how does the Stomp Dance go, the one you go home for? x

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      • #4
        The stomp dance is from the Southeast and later when those tribes were removed to Oklahoma they brought the dance with us
        It is not a Powwow Dance.
        In these parts it is a dance that is done at its own place...
        ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
        Till I Die!

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        • #5
          That's Right

          Originally posted by legalstraight View Post
          I live up around 'nishnabes and they look confused when I mention going back home for stomps.
          Not sure what you mean by something like stomp dancing- there are different types of southeastern dances that could all be classified as stomp, or broken down to be more specific.
          They might could have some dances that have the same names, but heck lotsa folks have dances with the same names (deer, bear, snake, fish etc..) but they have nothing to do with one another. And sometimes these are ceremonial and so are especially unrelated to each other.
          If you are relying on books this may be a case where some anthro got their wire crossed and then wrote it down like it was good.

          Also, stomp dancing is not pow-wow dancing- don't get 'em confused.
          I agree with what this Gentleman and Josiah have said.

          Its a totally different ballgame (heh heh).
          Because of our treaty status, the distinction of being 'Cherokee' is a status of citizenship, not a racial issue.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by elbahana View Post
            I know there's a Stomp Dance song from up north, but it's probably unrelated then to the dance in the south. It's probably me getting my wires crossed? So how does the Stomp Dance go, the one you go home for? x

            There are some Sioux songs known as Stomp Dance songs that are nothing like the southeast songs you're talking about. They are closer to crow hops. Maybe that's what you heard?
            I think everyone on this rez is addicted to Harry Potter...lol...

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            • #7
              Southeastern Stomp Dances

              Originally posted by elbahana View Post
              I have read someplace that the Stomp Dance originates in the south-east, but is there not a more northern version of the dance as well? Danced by the Ojibwe and other tribes around there? If so, could someone describe it me? x
              Usually the SE dance is done following a ceremony such as "green corn". It is done in a square, not in the circle.
              Walk softly on Mother Earth

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              • #8
                Do the Haudenosaunee have something called a stomp dance?
                Powwows will continue to evolve in many directions. It is inevitable.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by WhoMe View Post
                  Do the Haudenosaunee have something called a stomp dance?
                  Yes, but the one I know best is the Oklahoma stomp, from Oklahoma & passed onto them. Generally this is all told before the dance. I think this may lead to some people being confused about the origins (if they wasn't listening). As to others, or more info better have someone else complete this answer (cause this is my husbands people).

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                  • #10
                    Oklahoma Stomp

                    Originally posted by SuzzeQ4 View Post
                    Yes, but the one I know best is the Oklahoma stomp, from Oklahoma & passed onto them. Generally this is all told before the dance. I think this may lead to some people being confused about the origins (if they wasn't listening). As to others, or more info better have someone else complete this answer (cause this is my husbands people).
                    Yes, this is my understanding too.

                    I am still learning but am a Stomp Dancer. My cousin is teaching me more, as he belongs to a Ground in OK. Anyway, he related to me that it was the Creeks, our former enemies who helped us with this dance when we arrived in OK.

                    That is all I am going to say on the subject, as this is powwows.com, not stompgrounds.com.

                    LOL
                    Because of our treaty status, the distinction of being 'Cherokee' is a status of citizenship, not a racial issue.

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                    • #11
                      Northern Stomp

                      Well, what most people refer to as "stomp" are the traditional dances done by the southeastern tribes. There are versions that are similar that I was taught by my Seneca-Cayuga relatives such as the Canadian Dance and Standing Quiver Dance songs. To confuse matters even more, these ways, like many pow-wow dances, were given and passed to other peoples. I know that the Seneca-Cayuga of Oklahoma were given stomp by the Cherokee a LONG time ago and, more recently, have been influenced by the Shawnee stomp ways. I grew up around stomp, listening to the old folks talk about it and this is what they tell me about stomp. So, even though it is thought of as a southeastern dance, they aren't the only tribes that participate.
                      Also, my quapaw uncles tell me that stomp is a traditional part of their culture! I always thought they got it from being around stomp dance tribes, but many of the older folks say that isn't so, that they had it before they came to Oklahoma. I don't know if it's true or not, but it's what I was told by elders so that's good enough for me!
                      To make things even more confusing, My father-in-law came down to visit from Crow and we took him to a stomp. I figured he'd never seen it. He was just sitting kind of bobbing his head and I saw he was singing along. I asked him what he thought of Stomp and if he'd ever seen it before and he said, "Oh sure! We used to stomp up in Crow when I was younger." ???!!!!!!! From what he told me, some Crows met some Creek folks while they were both attending Haskell and the Creeks taught these Crows stomp songs. They took it home and for awhile it was done after the "war dancing" late into the night up on the hill where all the folks snag nowadays! But, eventually the elders put a stomp to it, he said, because of all the drinking that went on. The elders felt it wasn't treated right and they stopped allowing it to happen.
                      So, I think the term stomp is used to describe a similar type of song that included call and answer and some type of shaker, either worn by women or by men. These dances, like pow-wow dances and religious ways, were given and passed and shared. I think this was much more common in the old days than it is now. I don't think your information was incorrect, just that they were applying a fairly general term to a set of similar ways.
                      At least that's how I understand it.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tsuj510 View Post
                        Yes, this is my understanding too.

                        I am still learning but am a Stomp Dancer. My cousin is teaching me more, as he belongs to a Ground in OK. Anyway, he related to me that it was the Creeks, our former enemies who helped us with this dance when we arrived in OK.

                        That is all I am going to say on the subject, as this is powwows.com, not stompgrounds.com.

                        LOL
                        I have been told we were helped by many of our neighbors. They helped us remember the dikanodvhsdi. There were dances happening before Redbird, but they were not ceremonial just stomp (dilsdi) dances. tla nvwoti yigi yigeli

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