Optin Monster

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Straight Dance History

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Straight Dance History

    Hey Straight Dancers out there! I am in need of some history, origins, ect. on the Southern Plains Straight Dance. I myself am learning how to dance Straight. I am gathering research for a Senior Thesis project. Are there any good books out there easily accesible or any worthy internet sources with good info? I need information ranging from differences between northen and southern dancers, tribe differences, where and who established the dance, info on the Hethuska, ect. Any help in the right direction would be appreciated. Thanks!
    Hewman
    Jed Hewitt
    Unali'yi Lodge 236
    Charleston, SC

  • #2
    Gee Guy---Sorry to say this, but I don't think you will get a completed answer to all of your questions. Much of what you want is still debated. One group of people have claimed the dance as theirs and history seems to support their association with it for a long, long time. However, as the dance was given to other peoples, they customized it to their needs. What you end up with is a lot of different histories from each people's perspective.
    What I will tell you is that the modern straight dance clothes evolved from the clothes worn by the Tail dancer position of the old Heluska societies. Most the the clothes worn today are Osage style. You will see many dancers of other tribes, customizing their clothes to their individual or tribal styles. Some Straight Dancers on this board have never danced in the Heluska ceremonies, some have never danced powwows, only Heluska and some have done both. Each dancer will have their own ideas about Straight Dancing. This dance was call the Omaha dance a long time ago, and was also called the grass dance. Among the Kiowa, it was called Oh-ho-Ma. I am unaware of a Northern and Southern difference in Straightr dancers. Perhaps with this bit of information you would be able to start trailing the information you need. There is not one particular book that I am aware of that will tell you everything you need, but if you know what to look for, the history of this dance and the people who own it are referrenced in a great number of history books but under different names. Good Luck on your search, I know many of us have spent a liftime trying to learn about this and after 30 or 40 years we are still learning new things.

    Comment


    • #3
      May I recommend that you contact some of the elders of some of these particular tribes. Contact some Poncas, Osages, Omahas, Kiowas, Comanche, Sac-Fox, and OK Shawnees. Some Otoes-Kaws-Missouris do still exist. Our Ways were evolved from the Helushka(Ilonshka) ways as I was told. I was told that our suit is our tuxedo or tribal clothing. I agree that the tail dance is our dance of preference. This tells the whole story(kinda)
      BOB

      Comment


      • #4
        Good luck in your reserch there are many stories. The name Straight dancer is a name that was put on the clothes back in the fourties I believe, because there was not a name for them and thats when fancy dance was really popular at the contest dances.
        If I do not know the answer someone else will!!!!
        Also forgive me, this system does not have a spell check so forgive the bad spelling

        Comment


        • #5
          The most complete work on this subject is a book written by Jimmy Duncan call "Hethushka Zani, An Ethnohistory of the War Dance Complex" written as a thesis in 1997.
          nabeader

          Comment


          • #6
            Where can you find a copy of that?
            New to the site--Introduce Yourself

            Find a Pow Wow Near You!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by nabeader
              The most complete work on this subject is a book written by Jimmy Duncan call "Hethushka Zani, An Ethnohistory of the War Dance Complex" written as a thesis in 1997.
              nabeader
              I can't pass this one up. The Duncan text is nothing more than a hobs attempt to explain something he knows little or nothing about and he tried to justify it all with the claim that he's Indian...not hardly the case. It's like a comparison of grapefruits to cumquats and for an MA thesis it's an example of extremely poor scholarship that would not even begin to withstand the rigors of anthropological testing.
              Back in the 70's there was a little book published by a German con-artist named Eric VonDaniken called "Chariots of the Gods". His premise was that space aliens mated with monkeys in the dim past and produced the human race. He based his proof on a total misinterpretation of Aztec glyphs or sections of glyphs lifted out of context. He also claimed the massive figures on the Plains of Nazca were landing strips for alien spacecraft...geez, everybody knows they don't need landing strips!

              Duncan failed miserably because he didn't understand the data he attempted to cite and he tried to manipulated it in a meager attempt to prove his point...but many hobs buy into anything.
              Cat & Dog ...Another white meat.

              Comment


              • #8
                I knew there would be talk about this. I have read the Duncan text. It seems to me that alot of the text came from La Fleche's work with the Osages. The text also completely leaves out any contributions to the Hethuska by the Pawnees. I was always under the impression that the roach (which I have been told is a symbol of the Hethuska) was part of a Pawnee ceremony involving fire in which the priest, healer, medicine man etc. was not comsumed by the fire. But that is just what I have been told. The Duncan text also trys to link the Hethuska to ancient mound building people of the mid west and Ohio areas. That was a really long time ago 400 + years. I'm sure those elders he spoke to can't remember that far.
                Last edited by Tsi-tse Wa-tsi; 05-14-2002, 06:42 PM.
                Tha-ke'-tha-pi Wa-kon-ta

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hahaha landing strips

                  Originally posted by MrRuminator


                  ......geez, everybody knows they(space aliens) don't need landing strips!

                  One thing at a time...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ok, I remember that one now, I've read it.
                    New to the site--Introduce Yourself

                    Find a Pow Wow Near You!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What are everyone's thoughts on The Osage Ceremonial Dance I'N-Lon-Schka by Alice Ann Callahan.
                      New to the site--Introduce Yourself

                      Find a Pow Wow Near You!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pretty good story. Good info on the committee structure and what was given away when the drum was pasted. The play ground of the eldest son thing is wrong. But read it and then go to the sources. That is alway to best way to lean about it. If those people want to tell you, they will if they don't then don't push it, they are libel to tell you what they think you want to hear.
                        Tha-ke'-tha-pi Wa-kon-ta

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You may want to try to talk to Ed RedEagle JR.. The RedEagle Family I believe are still the DrumKeepers. I know that Uncle Ed RedEagle was the Speaker(elder) for the Il lon shkas at Pahuska. He was the head of the mineral rites council. You may also ask Cat Wilson or Billie Osage for some more recommendations. I believe they still work at the Tribal office and Museum in Pahuska. I'm no expert though I have danced several dances. I only know as I was taught.

                          Good luck with your research. Once I tried to assist in a language study at the Univ. of MO at Columbia.
                          BOB

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The best way to learn about the osage inlonshka is to go and see the ceremonial dances for yourself. I was told the dance teaches itself and I find this to be true. I've been participating every year at all three ceremonial districts since I was very young and I am still learning things today. I

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hello boys and girls. I am JIm Duncan, the guy who got slandered here the other day. "Hethushka Zani" is not a book but a manuscript. It is not for sale, so how did all these guys get a copy.
                              In regards to slander, the ruminator has at a disadvantage. I hide nothing ; my name, my heritage or credentials behind some funky cyber persona. I fully identify myself in my papers first chapter. So who are you? This paper has been reviewed by both my peers in the academic community and Indian community with overwhelming acceptance and a fair share of constructive criticism. I welcome any discussion that adds to our knowledge.
                              Anthroplogical testing? Do you know what you are talking about? This is not a scientific treatise but an ethnohistory gleaned from archaeological,historical,and contemporary sources. Granted all of these sources require subjective interpretation. My interpretations and reasoning is cited and supported in the paper. As for being a con-man-- well I list my sources and they can be read and checked by anyone. It is apparent the only person who did not understand the data and failed miserably in understanding the body and intent of my work is you, sir. I am currentyly editing for publication, the procedes of which will go to the Ponca Hethushka, of which I AM A MEMBER. I have spent all my 47 years in OKlahoma. I have spent 20 of those years as a mentor, educator and advisor to Native American students. All that matters is the truth. so debate me, challenge me and add to the body of discussion and I will change any passage in the new edition to reflect your input. But dont BS me. I took the time to read much of your input in this forum, you appear a knowledgable man. You might try treating others with the respect you so desperately seek yourself.
                              Because you cannot imagine it, does not mean it is not so.

                              Comment

                              Join the online community forum celebrating Native American Culture, Pow Wows, tribes, music, art, and history.

                              Loading...

                              Trending

                              Collapse

                              There are no results that meet this criteria.

                              Sidebar Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X