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  • #46
    References:

    Baird, W. David.
    1989. The Quapaws. Chelsea House Publishers, New York, NY.

    Dorsey, Rev. James Owen.
    1884. Omaha Sociology. Bureau of American Ethnology, 3rd Annual Report 1881-82, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
    1886. Migration of Siouan Tribes. The American Naturalist, Vol. 20, No. 3
    1890. The Cegiha Language. Contributions to North American Ethnology, Vol. 6, Washington, D.C.

    Dorsey, Rev. James Owen and Cyrus Thomas.
    1910. Ponca. Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 30, Part 2, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

    Duncan, Jim.
    1997. Hethushka Zani: An Ethnohistory of the War Dance Complex. MA thesis. Department of Anthropology, Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK.

    Fletcher, Alice C. and Francis LaFlesche.
    1911. The Omaha Tribe. Bureau of American Ethnology, 27th Annual Report 1905-06, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

    Foreman, Grant.
    1946. The Last Trek of the Indians. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.

    Howard, Dr. James H.
    1965. The Ponca Tribe. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 195, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
    1970. Known Village Sites of the Ponca. Plains Anthropologist, Journal of the Plains Conference, Vol. 15, No. 48, Stillwater, OK.

    James, Edwin.
    1823. Account of an Expedition from Pittsburgh to the Rocky Mountains, Performed in the Years 1819 and 20. Vol. 1 and Vol. 2, N.C. Carey and I. Lea, Phiadelphia, PA.

    Mails, Thomas E.
    1985. Plains Indians: Dog Soldiers, Bear Men and Buffalo Women. Bonanza Books, NY.

    McGee, W.J.
    1897. The Siouan Indians, a Preliminary Sketch. Bureau of American Ethnology, 15th Annual Report 1893-94, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

    O’Shea, John M. And John Ludwickson.
    1992. Archaeology and Ethnohistory of the Omaha Indians: The Big Village Site. University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, NE.

    Riggs, Stephen R.
    1893. Dakota Grammar, Texts and Ethnography. Contributions to North American Ethnology, Vol. 9.

    Royce, Charles C.
    1899. Indian Land Cessions in the United States. Bureau of American Ethnology, 18th Annual Report 1896-97, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

    Skinner, Alanson B.
    1915. Societies of the Iowa, Kansa and Ponca Indians. Anthropological Papers, American Museum of Natural History, Vol. 11, Part 9, New York, NY.

    Swanton, John R.
    1910. Osage. Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 30, Part 2, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

    Tibbits, G. Michael.
    2003. The Ponca Tribe and The Mormons, Shared History and Dedication, Desktop Pub.

    Wood, W. Raymond.
    1959. Notes on Ponca Ethnohistory, 1785-1804. Ethnohistorian, Vol. 6, No. 1, Bloomington, IN.

    "Be good, be kind, help each other."
    "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

    --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

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    • #47
      I love your posts on the subjects you have addressed here Historian... Thanks!
      I became a singer because I love to sing... and to feed my addiction to cough drops!

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by RedShield View Post
        I love your posts on the subjects you have addressed here Historian... Thanks!
        Thanks.

        "Be good, be kind, help each other."
        "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

        --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

        Comment


        • #49
          Let's not loose site of the fact that my original essay on the Ponca Hethuska Society and topics related to it, is a work in progress.

          "Be good, be kind, help each other."
          "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

          --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Historian View Post
            Just wondering...has this information been useful to anyone?
            WOW! I am currently getting together my regalia for straight dance and trying to learn all i can about the dance and its history. Finding this thread has been an eye opener. The info I have found up to now has just been a note scratched on a napkin compared to this thread. I'm going back to read it again.
            Thank you.

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            • #51
              Thank you Historian for your posts and research. This is the most information that I have seen on the Ponca and Hethuska. You mentioned that your work on Hethuska is a work in progress but I still have a question or two about it. How did the early ceremonial clothes evolve into the southern straight dance.clothes of modern day powwows? As the ponca traveled in the 17th and 18th centuries, what did they use for shelter? After relocating to oklahoma without time to grow crops what did they eat?

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