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  • Armbands

    Armbands are usually made from stamped trade-silver and are worn at the lowest part of the upper arm, just above the elbow. Usually, a one inch wide satin ribbon or ribbons, most often in a color matching the neckerchief and shoulder scarves, is folded evenly over the back of each armband so as to have the strips of ribbon about twelve inches long, hanging freely.











    Buck Elk Walking and Blackbird - Omaha/Missouri - 1875


    Bert Freemont with wives - Omaha - 1885


    Bert Fremont - Omaha - 1900


    Bacon Rind – Osage – 1900


    White Swan - Omaha - no date


    Joseph Springer – Iowa – 1901


    Omaha men - 1907


    Standing Bear - Omaha - 1909



    Bailey, Garrick, and Daniel Swan.
    2004. Art of the Osage. St. Louis Art Museum, University of Washington Press, Seattle, WA.

    Callahan, Alice A.
    1990. The Osage Ceremonial Dance, I’n-Lon-Schka. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK.

    Feder, Norman.
    1957-a. Costume of the Oklahoma Straight Dancer. The American Indian Hobbyist Newsletter, Vol. 4, No. 1.
    1957-b. Costume of the Oklahoma Straight Dancer. The American Indian Hobbyist Newsletter, Vol. 4, No. 2.
    1961. Plains Indian Metalworking, Part Two. American Indian Tradition Newsletter, Volume 8.

    Hail, Barbara N.
    1980. Hau, Kola!: The Plains Indian Collection of the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology. Brown University, Bristol, RI.

    Howard, Dr. James H.
    1965. The Ponca Tribe. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 195, Smithsonian Institution, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.
    1976. Ceremonial Dress of the Delaware Man. Special Issue, The Bulletin of the Archeological Society of New Jersey, No. 33, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ.

    LaFave, Edward J.
    1998. Straight Dance Clothing: How to Dress a Straight Dancer. Whispering Wind: American Indian Past & Present Magazine, Vol. 29, No. 4, Folsom, LA.

    Smith, Jerry.
    1982. Straight Dance Clothes: Getting Them On. Moccasin Tracks Magazine, April Issue, LaPalma, CA.

    Stewart, Tyronne H.
    1968. Dressing a Straight Dancer. The Singing Wire Newsletter, February Issue.

    "Be good, be kind, help each other."
    "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

    --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

  • #2
    Historian: Nice work pulling these examples together in these threads. It takes time to do it so thanks!

    Here is some more to supplement. I think these all came from the Smithsonian off the top of my head but that is likely to be wrong. Some of these may be wrist bands since I am not sure of the dimensions and it is late.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Fat Albert; 03-24-2009, 05:13 AM.

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    • #3
      I think the ribbons we use off the armbands today might have evolved from how these arm bands were tied on. Not sure since I have heard many different stories about why they are there. but I am including a pic of a guy (Ponca I think) that has his armbands tied on with what looks like cloth worn through holes in the armbands as some folks use shoelaces today. In the pic, the knots are accessible on the outside where today we find ribbons. The other photo has nice armbands also fastened with colorful cloth. Thoughts? I think we discussed this in another thread a while back.
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Fat Albert View Post
        I think the ribbons we use off the armbands today might have evolved from how these arm bands were tied on. Not sure since I have heard many different stories about why they are there. but I am including a pic of a guy (Ponca I think) that has his armbands tied on with what looks like cloth worn through holes in the armbands as some folks use shoelaces today. In the pic, the knots are accessible on the outside where today we find ribbons. The other photo has nice armbands also fastened with colorful cloth. Thoughts? I think we discussed this in another thread a while back.
        I think this is a very possible scenario. :->

        "Be good, be kind, help each other."
        "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

        --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

        Comment


        • #5

          "Be good, be kind, help each other."
          "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

          --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

          Comment


          • #6
            Bump...

            "Be good, be kind, help each other."
            "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

            --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

            Comment


            • #7
              A Bump Here Nice pictures.
              Asema Is Sacred
              Traditional Use, Not Misuse
              Wakan Tanka please have compassion on me.
              OK Niji we are running a train with red over yellow at this powwow.

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              • #8
                I thank you for the information! I was looking for and could not find. You helped me!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Next ^^^^ is next.

                  Moderators, another one.


                  Why must I feel like that..why must I chase the cat?


                  "When I was young man I did some dumb things and the elders would talk to me. Sometimes I listened. Time went by and as I looked around...I was the elder".

                  Mr. Rossie Freeman

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