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  • Bandoliers

    Bandoliers are an essential component for straight dancers.

    The pair of bandoliers are most often strings of large trade beads with leather spacers, worn in a loop which extends from each shoulder to the opposite hip.

    Each bandolier consists of one to three strings of brass, silver or glass trade beads (cut crystal "aurora borealis" beads are frequently sought after), by themselves or strung in combination with bone hairpipes averaging between one and three inches long, and held together with leather spacers. Another version of bandoliers are made from silver beads, mescal beans, or a combination of both. These are frequently seen today on many Comanche, Kiowa or Southern Cheyenne outfits and often have reference to a Gourd Dance organization or the Native American Church, though members of Gourd Dance organizations or NAC members will usually wear the bandoliers over one shoulder.

    Nokoney – Comanche – 1870


    Quanah Parker – Comanche – 1890


    Comanche man – 1891


    Comanche men – 1891


    Quanah Parker – Comanche – 1892


    Henry Red Eagle and son - Osage - 1893


    Wooden Lance - Kiowa - 1894


    Frank Corndropper and Paul Buffalo - Osage - 1895


    Comanche couple – 1895


    Andrew Perd-A-Sof-Py - Comanche - no date


    Buffalo Meat, Three Fingers, Wolf Robe - Southern Cheyenne - 1895


    Two Hatchet - Kiowa - 1898


    Mo-She-Wa-Ku-De - Omaha - 1898


    Little Snake - Omaha - 1898


    Chas Baddle - Omaha/Otoe - 1898


    Howard Frost - Omaha - 1898


    James White Water - Otoe - 1898


    Raises The Dust - Ponca - 1898


    Henry Roman Nose, Yellow Bear, Lame Man - Southern Cheyenne - 1899


    Southern Cheyenne father and son - 1900


    Bacon Rind – Osage – 1900


    Good Fox - Pawnee - 1902


    It Is Him - Otoe - 1907


    Bird Chief – Southern Arapaho – 1909


    Bacon Rind – Osage – 1909


    George Michelle - Osage - 1910


    John Wood - Osage - 1910


    Prairie Chief – Southern Cheyenne – 1911


    Makes Them Cry – Osage – 1913


    Walks With Effort, II - Ponca - 1914


    Crazy Bear - Ponca - 1914


    Bacon Rind – Osage – 1916


    Tenikwa – Comanche – 1919


    Albert Atocni – Comanche – 1926






    No matter the style, straight dancers today will usually wear a pair of bandoliers, one over each shoulder, crossing in the front and back. When the leather belt is put on, the bandoliers usually come over the belt in front and under the belt in back, though this is left to personal preference.

    When a vest is worn, with or without a ribbonshirt, the bandoliers are sometimes omitted so as not to do damage to the beadwork on the vest.


    Ashworth, Kenneth Albert.
    1986. The Contemporary Oklahoma Pow-wow. Ph.D. dissertation. Department of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma.

    Bailey, Garrick, and Daniel Swan.
    2004. Art of the Osage. St. Louis Art Museum, University of Washington Press, Seattle, WA.

    Callahan, Alice A.
    1990. The Osage Ceremonial Dance, I’n-Lon-Schka. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK.

    Ellis, Clyde
    2003. A Dancing People: Powwow Culture on the Southern Plains. University of Kansas Press, Lawrence, KS.

    Feder, Norman.
    1957-a. Costume of the Oklahoma Straight Dancer. The American Indian Hobbyist Newsletter, Vol. 4, No. 1.
    1957-b. Costume of the Oklahoma Straight Dancer. The American Indian Hobbyist Newsletter, Vol. 4, No. 2.
    1980. Some Notes on the Osage War Dance. Moccasin Tracks Magazine, November Issue, LaPalma, CA.

    Fleming, Paula Richardson.
    2003. Native American Photography at the Smithsonian: The Shindler Catalogue. Smithsonian Books, Washington, D.C.

    Fletcher, Alice C. and Francis LaFlesche.
    1911. The Omaha Tribe. Bureau of American Ethnology, 27th Annual Report 1905-06, Smithsonian Institution, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

    Hail, Barbara N.
    1980. Hau, Kola!: The Plains Indian Collection of the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology. Brown University, Bristol, RI.

    Howard, Dr. James H.
    1955. The Pan-Indian Culture in Oklahoma. The Scientific Monthly, Vol. 81, No. 5.
    1965. The Ponca Tribe. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 195, Smithsonian Institution, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.
    1976. Ceremonial Dress of the Delaware Man. Special Issue, The Bulletin of the Archeological Society of New Jersey, No. 33, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ.

    Johnson, Tim. Ed.
    1998. Spirit Capture: Photographs from the National Museum of the American Indian. Smithsonian Books, Washington, D.C.

    Kavanagh, Thomas W.
    1992. Southern Plains Dance Tradition and Dynamics: Native American Dance Ceremonies and Social Traditions. National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution with Starwood, Washington D.C.

    LaFave, Edward J.
    1998. Straight Dance Clothing: How to Dress a Straight Dancer. Whispering Wind: American Indian Past & Present Magazine, Vol. 29, No. 4, Folsom, LA.

    Smith, Jerry.
    1968. Straight Dance Bandoliers. The Singing Wire Newsletter, January Issue.
    1982. Straight Dance Clothes: Getting Them On. Moccasin Tracks Magazine, April Issue, LaPalma, CA.

    Stewart, Tyronne H.
    1968. Dressing a Straight Dancer. The Singing Wire Newsletter, February Issue.

    Woerpel, Loren.
    2004. Bead & Hairpipe Bandoliers. Whispering Wind: American Indian Past & Present Magazine, Vol. 34, No. 6, Folsom, LA

    "Be good, be kind, help each other."
    "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

    --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

  • #2
    Any further discussion?

    "Be good, be kind, help each other."
    "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

    --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Historian View Post
      Any further discussion?
      What is the signifigance or origin of the bandolier? Is it purley decrotive or did evolve from something else like a sholder bag?

      Comment


      • #4
        During a Peyote Meeting,
        Osage's were instructed,
        through a vision to wear
        scalp feathers and mescal bandoliers.
        There is significance to every piece,
        that we adorn ourselves with.
        Alot of the way we dress is traditional way
        that they used to dress for everyday.
        wa-zha-zhe

        Comment


        • #5

          "Be good, be kind, help each other."
          "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

          --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

          Comment


          • #6
            old guy with old stuff

            About 20 years ago my grandfather's second wife gave me a wood box with some things in it that she said she didn't know anything about. One of the items was a bandolier. I have figured most of it out but the significance of the silk handkerchief with "spice" tied up in it escapes me.

            Can anyone help?
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by puderse View Post
              About 20 years ago my grandfather's second wife gave me a wood box with some things in it that she said she didn't know anything about. One of the items was a bandolier. I have figured most of it out but the significance of the silk handkerchief with "spice" tied up in it escapes me.

              Can anyone help?
              It has been said, that the herbs tied up to a bandolier may have had it's origins with "love medicine".

              "Be good, be kind, help each other."
              "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

              --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

              Comment


              • #8
                I have been told that we wear our bandoliers with this tobacco/medicine bundle tied to the bandolier as a symbol from our loved ones (ladies). This was for thier prayer and a symbol of their care. ( This guy is mine) sort of thing.

                I also, like what my very good friend wa-zha-zhe had to say about our Church meetings clothes/items. Thanks, wa-zha-zhe. It was good seeing you all again this past summer. I keep you in my Prayers for your health and your family.
                BOB

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thank you and God bless you. It is always good to see you my friend! I will always remember walking with you in our Indian clothes.
                  wa-zha-zhe

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We did have a good walk. It isn't often anymore that anyone walks in with me from our directions anymore. I was very proud that you were able to make this walk. I was also very glad that your truck was able to get started.

                    'Til next time, your friend- always.
                    BOB

                    Comment

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