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  • Couple of Questions

    Is a Dance Stick always a straight peice of wood w/beading and fur?
    Is it true only people that wear Turbans have Elders that were Cheifs or porminent people of the tribe?
    Last edited by DWhtfeather; 09-14-2003, 04:53 PM.

  • #2
    Hu??? ummm Turbon ????? You got me by the moc strings!
    Better known an loved as Men~Nie Turtles !
    Life is what you make it. Becareful what you give . You just might get it back!

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    • #3
      I hope you're kidding. Here's a link with a picture of an otter turban. This site mentions the chief descendants, but I've heard otherwise. I was hoping a dancer who wears a turban would have some personal insight.

      www.littlecrowtradingpost.com/pageregalia.htm
      Last edited by DWhtfeather; 09-14-2003, 07:37 PM.

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      • #4
        ok I got ya now but sorry that is not for me to answer I hope you get the answer you are looking for ..Safe journey!
        Better known an loved as Men~Nie Turtles !
        Life is what you make it. Becareful what you give . You just might get it back!

        Comment


        • #5
          Is a Dance Stick always a straight peice of wood w/beading and fur?
          It is very un-wise to use the term "always" when it comes to dance traditions. There are usually exceptions to just about anything. In 99% of the Straight Dance Tail Sticks I have seen they have been straight, usually made from a wooden gun cleaning rod, about 2 to 2.5 feet long.

          However, I have only seen two Tail Sticks with slight variation in my 32 years of dancing. One, was made from wood, about 3 feet long, with a curved end. It looked like a very small cane, and was decorated with gourdstitch beadwork, some otter fur and a few dangle feathers. The other Tail Stick was made from a section of tree that had a vine wrapped around it to give it a corkscrew spiral appearance. It was thin and straight, but had a spiral twist.
          It is important to consider that these two special variations may have been for very special reasons having to do with dreams, family tradition, official permission unique to a clan or tribe, or something similar.

          Most all other Tail Sticks I have seen are straight and decorated with wrapstitch, gourdstitch (aka peyote stitch) or brickwork beadwork. Perhaps some otter fur decoration, some bone or silver inlay decoration, or intricate carving into the wood. Some even have small dangle feathers attached on the end.

          "Be good, be kind, help each other."
          "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

          --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

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          • #6
            Is it true only people that wear Turbans have Elders that were Cheifs or porminent people of the tribe?
            I don't know "why" some people wear Fur Turbans, each person would have their own personal reason, especially depending on what tribal tradition they follow, and if they follow a tradition at all or just go by personal preference.

            I can tell you that there are many old (1800s) photographs of Ponca, Osage, Omaha, Sauk & Fox, Iowa, Otoe, Missouria, Kaw, Pawnee, Quapaw, Comanche, Kiowa, Menomini and Potawatomie men wearing Otter Fur Turbans. Although I cannot tell you the traditions of each tribe as to what the Otter Fur Turban meant to them, I can tell you that among the Ponca in the old days, the Otter Fur Turban was worn only by Ponca Chiefs or sub-Chiefs.

            One last piece of advice...if you are considering putting together an Otter Fur Turban in a particular Tribal Tradition (they have many variations in style and decoration), ask questions among the elders of that tribe. If your set of clothes are Comanche style, go to Melvin Kerchee...if they are of Ponca style, go to Damon Roughface, and so on. It is good to ask questions.

            "Be good, be kind, help each other."
            "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

            --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

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            • #7
              Historian,
              Thank you for your get post. Your knowledge will go a long way.
              Thanks again,
              DRU

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              • #8
                My husband wears an otter cap because he is chieftain line on both sides ofhis family.

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                • #9
                  the Otter turban

                  well here among the Omahas the Roach was worn in battles and the the Otter Turban was worn at ceremonies. And only the chieftains wore two eagle tail feathers on their fur turbans, so when you see dancers with two feathers in there fur turbans would be descendents of chiefs. I know My uncle Henrey Collins wears two feathers on his otter turban, cause he is a descendent of chief Big Elk. and he is the one who told me this little interpretaion. I know this to be among the Omaha, Ponca, Osage, Kansa, and the Quapaw. Here you go
                  >>>~~~~*~~~~<<< THUNDERHILL >>>~~~~*~~~~<<<

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the info.
                    DRU

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