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Wool and Silk Turbans

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  • Wool and Silk Turbans

    While I have no information to offer concerning turbans made from finger-woven wool sashes, or made from silk material, these types of headwear appear in many old photos of some Central Plains and Prairie tribes, both alone or in combination with a hair roach.

    If anyone has any information to offer on this topic, I'd be very interested in learning more.

    Some examples of turbans made from finger-woven wool yarn sashes, such as the picture below:



    Pipe Chief - Pawnee - 1858


    L-R: Sun Chief, A Fine Horse, Lone Chief, Struck By A Tomahawk, One Aimed At - Pawnee - 1868


    Lone Chief, Standing Buffalo Bull, Iron Whip, Walks With Effort I - Ponca - 1858


    Lone Chief (aka Antoine Primeaux)– Ponca – no date


    Lone Chief (aka Antoine Primeaux) – Ponca – no date


    James Whitewater - Otoe - 1891


    Prairie Turtle - Otoe - 1894


    Otoe man - 1896


    Robert Headman - Otoe - 1898


    James Whitewater - Otoe - 1898


    Iowa man - no date


    Little Chief – Iowa – 1869


    Bear – Iowa – 1869


    Deer Thigh – Iowa – 1869


    Standing Hawk, Little Chief, Rattling Thunder - Omaha - 1866


    Buck Elk Walking, Blackbird - Omaha/Missouri - 1875


    The Buck - Omaha - 1883


    Hard Ribs - Omaha - no date


    The Watchful Fox - Sauk & Fox - 1847


    Sauk & Fox man - 1858


    Sauk & Fox men – 1866


    Many Scalps - Sauk & Fox - 1868


    Moses Keokuk - Sauk & Fox - 1868


    Winding Stream - Sauk & Fox - 1890


    Shining River - Sauk & Fox - 1890


    Shining River - Sauk & Fox - 1890


    Black Dog, Not Afraid of Pawnees - Osage – 1877





    Some examples of turbans made from silk material:

    Buffalo Bull - Pawnee - 1858


    Group of 4 Pawnee men and 1 interpreter - 1868


    Driving A Herd - Pawnee - 1868


    William Faw Faw - Otoe - no date


    Knife - Iowa - 1869


    Omaha men - 1875


    White Horns – Osage – 1904

    "Be good, be kind, help each other."
    "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

    --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

  • #2

    "Be good, be kind, help each other."
    "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

    --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

    Comment


    • #3
      Bump...

      "Be good, be kind, help each other."
      "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

      --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

      Comment


      • #4
        i am thinking of doing a "pueblo style" cap.....made of wool of course
        "I on the trail of a possible good Indian lady and she is reported to like the old way's and she to believes in big family and being at home with kids all the time"... - MOTOOPI aka WOUNDED BEAR

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you!!! WONDERFUL pictures!
          "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it."

          Comment


          • #6
            Too bad we don't see anyone wearing these at dances.



            .
            Traditions.....keep them and keep them sacred!

            I am NOT Indian. I have never been to India, nor has any of my family before me! I have met these people from India, of whom you speak, and I am nothing like them. Why do you call me an Indian?

            .

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Mato Mahe View Post
              Too bad we don't see anyone wearing these at dances.



              .
              I've have seen one or two. The most memorable one was a VERY traditional Cherokee gentleman at the Nat'l Powwow. He looked right out of a history book, and wearing a silk turban with fluffy fancy ostrich plumes. Pretty amazing. We complimented him on his way into the ring. He sure was having a good time, too!
              "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it."

              Comment


              • #8
                Head Wrap

                Photos of headwrap taken from Photobucket.
                http://s636.photobucket.com/albums/u...w%2010-6-2012/





                Attached Files
                Last edited by Mato Mahe; 11-28-2012, 01:11 PM. Reason: Still learning how to do this attachment stuff!!
                Traditions.....keep them and keep them sacred!

                I am NOT Indian. I have never been to India, nor has any of my family before me! I have met these people from India, of whom you speak, and I am nothing like them. Why do you call me an Indian?

                .

                Comment

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