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  • #16
    Back in the day the Wisconsin Ho-Chunk had thier Haylushka but it doesn't exist anymore. Before Mike Winneshek died he was working with Ken Funmaker, SR to start it up again. The songs are still around and continue to be sung by the Wisconsin Dells Singers and other groups up that way.

    I'm not aware of anything with the Nebraska Winnebago. Although the sign at the VFW in Winnebago, NE says "Men's Haylushka" on it. I saw that sign a couple of years ago.

    CEM

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    • #17
      Hmmmm

      Interesting, CEM. I lived up in Wisconsin for a while and never heard about that. I talked to lots of old folks about straight dance and Southern Plains ways, but most had never heard it, much less seen it.

      I've heard and know some of those songs, but never thought they related to a particular society. Do you know when and where they picked it up?

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      • #18
        I don't see where this question was ever answered. To my way of thinking, a "tail dance", the way the term is now used, is something relatively new on the scene. I suspect that it may have started with Melvin Kerchee, Sr., maybe 15-20 years ago or so. It doesn't have the meaning of Man Dance, Hethushka, Iruska, or Ilonska.

        I saw one of them where the tail dancers are picked randomly at the start of a powwow, and several straight songs are sung, maybe eight(?). The tail dancers will dance the tails in the proper way. Then, after those songs, the dance becomes a regular powwow, and the tail dancers no longer "do their thing". The rationale announced at the dance was that this was in remembrance of how the powwow originated, and that it was to honor those early dancers, now gone.

        I attended another where the tail dancers continued to tail throughout the dance, even though the dance was not sponsored by one of the formalized, traditional, sanctioned organizations.


        There are dancers who think that this is trendy and OK, and there are others who think that this kind of dance is not peanuts, nor is it butter. "It's peanut butter".

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Gledanh Zhinga
          ...I saw one of them where the tail dancers are picked randomly at the start of a powwow, and several straight songs are sung, maybe eight(?). The tail dancers will dance the tails in the proper way. Then, after those songs, the dance becomes a regular powwow, and the tail dancers no longer "do their thing".....


          Gledanh,

          I have seen this too. Once in New Mexico and twice in Oklahoma. I was a little leary about dancing because they were all "intertribal."


          ____



          Paraivo, Park and CEM,

          Concerning the HoChunk Hayluska, they are in a period of reviving their man dance. I received the following notice during the summer:


          Ho-Chunk Hayluska
          Good Village, Friendship, Wisconsin
          Saturday, August 26, 2005


          Over 200 people attended the reinstated Ho-Chunk Hayluska, the first such dance to be held since World War II. 16 dancers participated, including 8 Ho-Chunk, 1 Menominee, 1 Ojibwa, 4 White Bear, and 2 friends of White Bear. Chief Winneshiek’s family sponsored the traditional Ho-Chunk mourners’ feast at Noontime whereas the Funmaker family under the leadership of Maryanne (Ho-Chunk; White Bear head cook; and sister of Ken Funmaker, Sr.) and Anthony Yazzie (Navajo; White Bear head cook) sponsored the evening feast.

          Although Ho-Chunk singers have long kept their repertoire of hayluska songs, this was the first Ho-Chunk hayluska and a learning experience for all present-day participants. Consequently, at the request of headman Ken Funmaker, Sr., Mark Thiel and Greg Bergenske served as whip man and water boy respectively. While most Ho-Chunk dancers wore Northern traditional bustles, lead singer Bradford Funmaker commented afterwards that next year he hoped to dance and wear a dragger instead, which most likely would be a Ho-Chunk first.

          The apparent group consensus is that the event was very enjoyable and an overwhelming success. Many women danced outside of the arbor and a number of men not dancing said they would do so next year. Presumably word will spread and more will attend next year as well.
          WhoMe
          PauWau Coordinator
          Last edited by WhoMe; 12-28-2005, 05:39 PM.
          Powwows will continue to evolve in many directions. It is inevitable.

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          • #20
            Thanks for the info on the Ho-Chunch Hayluska. A friend sent me pictures of the dance they held in the summer. I was glad to see this restarted in that area. Someday I hope to attend.

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            • #21
              Thanks for the info on the Ho-Chunk Hayluska. A friend sent me pictures of the dance they held in the summer. I was glad to see this restarted in that area. Someday I hope to attend.

              Comment


              • #22
                I was told that the Omaha s have a tail dance session prior to their dances.

                Have you been able to dance with the Apaches in Lawton OK. They have a dance they call Apache Formal Dance. When I was able to dance with them they were at the Fair Grounds. Same building the CIVA danced at along with some other dances. I think this dance is in the spring, sorry can't remember.
                BOB

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                • #23
                  In the powwow scene, each tail dance that I have witnessed has been a little different, depending, I guess, on the committee's interpretation. It seems there is a lack of understanding or consensus about what tail dancers really do at their home society dances.

                  At the recent Black Eagle Powwow held at Santa Ana Star Casino, New Mexico, there was a pseudo, quasi something or another which the committee thought was a "tail dance". The announcer tried to explain it, but his explanation was a misch masch. After Grand Entry, four Northern Traditional dancers were chosen to be in the four directions within the circle. Four Southern hethushka songs were sung for them, and they kind of danced in their own quadrant of the circle. The four songs had tails, but there was no idea of real tail dancers coming off a bench to dance the tails. Some Northern Traditional dancers were dancing in place at one side of the circle, as though honoring the four guys. There were a number of straight dancers at the powwow, but I could not see that they were included in any of this. I was seated and to tell the truth, I was surprised and numbed by the whole thing. I hope it doesn't become an instant tradition.

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                  • #24
                    I had an honor dance that was tail dance at Pawnee in March. I'd never really heard of a tail dance but my grandpa wanted to do it the old way so instead of just a dance, it was tail dance.
                    "All your life you are told the things you cannot do. All your life they will say you're not good enough or strong enough or talented enough; they will say you're the wrong height or the wrong weight or the wrong type to play this or be this or achieve this. THEY WILL TELL YOU NO, a thousand times no, until all the no's become meaningless. All your life they will tell you no, quite firmly and very quickly.
                    AND YOU WILL TELL THEM YES."
                    - Nike ad

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Gledanh Zhinga
                      In the powwow scene, each tail dance that I have witnessed has been a little different, depending, I guess, on the committee's interpretation. It seems there is a lack of understanding or consensus about what tail dancers really do at their home society dances.

                      At the recent Black Eagle Powwow held at Santa Ana Star Casino, New Mexico, there was a pseudo, quasi something or another which the committee thought was a "tail dance". The announcer tried to explain it, but his explanation was a misch masch. After Grand Entry, four Northern Traditional dancers were chosen to be in the four directions within the circle. Four Southern hethushka songs were sung for them, and they kind of danced in their own quadrant of the circle. The four songs had tails, but there was no idea of real tail dancers coming off a bench to dance the tails. Some Northern Traditional dancers were dancing in place at one side of the circle, as though honoring the four guys. There were a number of straight dancers at the powwow, but I could not see that they were included in any of this. I was seated and to tell the truth, I was surprised and numbed by the whole thing. I hope it doesn't become an instant tradition.
                      Buh -

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        What do YOU think when a straight dancer lifts his tail stick after his contest?

                        What if the straight dancer was never a tail dancer? Should the drum honor his request?
                        Powwows will continue to evolve in many directions. It is inevitable.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Growing up around inlonshka, I heard alot of head committee men stand up and talk about this. From what I gathered all those years is that only the head tail dancer is allowed to raise his stick, and he may do it when he feels "the ground becomes holy" and a good feeling is present.

                          When another dancer, who is not a designated tail dancer, dances on a tail, we consider it a mistake that needs to be corrected and paid for. I've seen this done by people, who couldn't make it back to their seat in time and by people who did it on purpose and they called it "stepping on the tail", whereas they had a brief small giveaway immediatley following the tail, to pay for the mistake.

                          As far as powwows go, I've seen it done, where a dancer raises his stick in hope of the drum to acknowledge him as a tail dancer, and I've seen where the drum did sing the tail and times when the singers didn't.

                          My perspective is that things like this shouldn't be taken lightly, there are rules and protocal involved. We wouldn't allow our ceremonial dances to be like a powwow, so why would we allow a powwow to be like a ceremonial dance? There are differences, we don't mix them, and it seems like only the ones brought up around the dances or powwows know the difference. Or at least they take the time to.

                          I only hope that people do more research and more respectful when it comes to these ways.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I figure that there is a time and place for all things. If you are carrying a stick you should have earned it. If you earned it you know what it is for/ represents and how to use it as well as the costs. Therefore those with sticks should be recognized by the drum because they should know what they are doing and are prepared to take care of the obligations that come from that, regardless of where they are. But how many straight dancers have no idea? There goes my logic! Maybe the tail dancers should carry an article of clothing that is distinct, shows everyone their position and is only carried by... ohhh forget it!
                            Fat Albert
                            Eater of all frybread!!
                            Last edited by Fat Albert; 07-06-2006, 07:40 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Fat Albert
                              I figure that there is a time and place for all things. If you are carrying a stick you should have earned it. If you earned it you know what it is for/ represents and how to use it as well as the costs. Therefore those with sticks should be recognized by the drum because they should know what they are doing and are prepared to take care of the obligations that come from that, regardless of where they are...
                              This would be the ideal, unfortunately, there are so many Straight Dancers carrying Tail Sticks now-a-days without the background knowledge and/or the rights given to go with that honor, that it would be difficult for a Head Singers to differentiate.

                              "Be good, be kind, help each other."
                              "Respect the ground, respect the drum, respect each other."

                              --Abe Conklin, Ponca/Osage (1926-1995)

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by park
                                Interesting, CEM. I lived up in Wisconsin for a while and never heard about that. I talked to lots of old folks about straight dance and Southern Plains ways, but most had never heard it, much less seen it.

                                I've heard and know some of those songs, but never thought they related to a particular society. Do you know when and where they picked it up?


                                A buddy and I danced at the 1957 Nebraska Winnebago Powwow, and they sang many word songs that were like hethushka songs. We recorded some of them on one of those old, heavy reel-to-reel players. Not too much later, Clyde Warrior, Ponca, told me that he took an auto trip with a Hochunk guy, and they sang songs to each other. They started teasing each other, because many of the songs were the same tune, but different words. They were accusing each others tribe of "stealing songs". Clyde said they had a great time.

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