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  • Yoke fringe

    What size beads do you suggest using to fringe the front/back of a fully beaded yoke?

    What size, and what type???

    I appreciate any information.

  • #2
    umm it might help if I had a clue as to what you were talking about. heh
    There should be a law against stupid people being able to breed!

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    • #3
      DO you intend to make the dress look old, then the fringes should be shorter (like going to your hips).
      Should it be more the contemporary style then the fringes can go down to almost touching the floor.

      I made mine going way down and cut them about 1 centimeter (about 0.4 inch) wide.

      That's mine!
      Attached Files
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      • #4
        I think she is asking about a BEADED fringe. I've done beaded fringe on purses and braid ties before but not on a dress! That's a lot of work. I sure wouldn't go too small! If you are using cut beads, I wouldn't go smaller than size 9 3-cuts. Or how about size 10 2-cuts or the smallest bugle beads that they make. They really shine and the job will go faster.

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        • #5
          Sorry I didn't make myself very clear.

          I am going to add a row of larger beads (like a size 9mm or 6mm). The buckskin fringe would be on the arms of the yoke, just like usual.

          But on the body part of the yoke (below the shoulders in the back and below the breast in the front), there would be my row of fringe out of the larger beads.

          Am I making sense?????????

          :p

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          • #6
            Oh, like where we used to use tile beads on buckskin strings? I use 8mm fire polish beads on thread or sinew and then sew a knotted string of buckskin to the bottom so that it looks like they are threaded on buckskin even though the holes in the beads are too small for buckskin.

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            • #7
              You're making perfect sense to me. I have a book entitled "Native America...Arts, Traditions, and Celebrations, by Christine Mather. If you have a copy of this book, turn to page 188. There is a picture of a lady wearing a buckskin dress with a fully beaded yoke. Buckskin fringe is hanging of the sleeves of her dress. In the middle, at the base of the yoke, there is a row of fringe made up of maybe 6 or 8 mm glass fire polish beads. The bead fringe is set up the way you would put bead fringe on a rosette.

              Redfringe, my guess is that you would use that technique for working on beaded fringe. I think that I would use artificial sinew to string the beads. You would string your beads come back up through the row of beads once you had your end bead in place. Let me know if this makes sense to you. Good luck with your fringe.

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              • #8
                I've seen some dresses from the Plateau and Columbia River region with beaded fringe at the lower edge of the bodice/yoke. I like the look of the larger beads, the 8mm cut crystal looks really classy. Don't use plastic beads, they show wear and just look cheap. With fringes of smaller beads, there is more a danger of them catching on stuff and breaking. Ending each fringe piece with a leather strip as mentioned above looks nice. You can also end with coins, thimbles or cowrie shells. You may want to individually knot each fringe strand just so if one breaks, you will only lose one strand.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Suzizila
                  You're making perfect sense to me. I have a book entitled "Native America...Arts, Traditions, and Celebrations, by Christine Mather. If you have a copy of this book, turn to page 188. There is a picture of a lady wearing a buckskin dress with a fully beaded yoke. Buckskin fringe is hanging of the sleeves of her dress. In the middle, at the base of the yoke, there is a row of fringe made up of maybe 6 or 8 mm glass fire polish beads. The bead fringe is set up the way you would put bead fringe on a rosette.

                  Redfringe, my guess is that you would use that technique for working on beaded fringe. I think that I would use artificial sinew to string the beads. You would string your beads come back up through the row of beads once you had your end bead in place. Let me know if this makes sense to you. Good luck with your fringe.
                  Hey Suzizila!

                  Could you post a pic of that yoke?
                  I'd like to see it!

                  Thx

                  Selina
                  Join my FB page:
                  https://www.facebook.com/#!/NatamBeadwork


                  Live each and every day of your life as though it would be your last!

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                  • #10
                    Selina, I wish I could, but I don't have a scanner. It's a picture in my book. The dress has appliqued roses on the yoke with the background filled in with turquoise blue lane stitch. You should check out the book. Amazon might have it.

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                    • #11
                      hmm, ok,
                      thx for the info!
                      :)
                      Join my FB page:
                      https://www.facebook.com/#!/NatamBeadwork


                      Live each and every day of your life as though it would be your last!

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                      • #12
                        Hey everyone.........thanks for the information.:Wave

                        I never would have thought of stringing these beads on sinew first. I probably would have struggled to get a buckskin thong thru the beads!! :p

                        Do you all think 8mm or 9mm is the best size to use?? That sounds good........Like Czechy said, there will probably be less chance to catch the larger beads on anything.

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