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WOW..is it wrong for ppl to wear...

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  • redbear
    replied
    I dance traditional cloth.... my mother made my regelia and I must say I LOVE to see the circle full with everyones individual dance styles!

    Leave a comment:


  • lil anna
    replied
    This has been a great thread for me. I am an Aleut from here in Alaska. I was brought into the arena 7 years ago by my very best good friend. I watched for a couple years then we put together a tradish cloth outfit and she brought me in in a good way.

    I have danced tradish cloth ever since. I have always worn a T-dress usually in calico or brocade material with ribbon trim and I dance northern style.

    I have often wondered how appropriate it would be for me to dance with a dress made in aleut style (which is very close to t-dress style)with aleut adornment and still dance northern style. Aleut is a northern tribe after all.
    I would love to be able to represent some of my own tribe while continuing to dance the style I love.

    Leave a comment:


  • WhoMe
    replied
    _______


    Heyadancer:

    YOUR idea is about the BEST IDEA I have heard in a long time!

    So many people live in a region far from the area where a dance originated.

    In your case, you are a Great Lakes/woodlands tribe wanting to dance the southern style. I see your idea as a great compromise to have the desire to dance another tribe's style - yet hold on to your own designs.

    "This could be the beginning of a new trend!"

    Yes, if you wore a traditional dress with identifiable patterns to a southern powwow in Oklahoma, you would be challenged by someone who's style of dress you are wearing. But if you have your own designs - not a whole lot can be said!

    In honesty, I admire the Ojibwe, Navahos, Tglinkits, Senecas, Yakamas, Cherokees et al. who are proud of who they are and wear their own tribal dresses . . .

    But times change and we have to make compromises to fit the times . . . . just as our ancestors have done before us.

    Leave a comment:


  • native_jingle2001
    replied
    heyadancer, i agree with you..i would like to dance in a buckskin similar to southern..i would be afraid someone would come take it away!! i, personally would not got approach anyone and take their outfit..i just don't see taking someones things away. but i get the point of this thread..(am ojibwe).....i like dancing traditional but wear plain skirts and tops..don't need to look "cool" anymore..!!!! i just love dancing..

    Leave a comment:


  • quicksilverwade
    replied
    Originally posted by spicysouthern
    robin1 are navajos a southern or northern tribe? i seen a few navajos that dance southern in a oklahoma style pattern. are they considered a southern tribe its all kewl just asking
    I've considered the Dineh to be a southwestern tribe. So they probably can have their choice of going southern or northern. I haven't seen any problems regarding southern Dineh dancers or northern Dineh dancers. Sometimes their choice of colors can be a kaleidoscope nightmare but their dancing helps overcome the color error.

    Leave a comment:


  • ~+~Heya~+~
    replied
    Originally posted by CYSA
    heyadancer why wouldn't you use your floral design?
    Because it would be a southern cloth dress and I would be dancing southern style. Soooo....what do you think of that?

    Leave a comment:


  • Okwataga
    replied
    heyadancer why wouldn't you use your floral design?

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  • southern girlz
    replied
    I'm putting my two cents in.

    Although some poeple may dance their dance with respect, it still isnt right for them to dance that particular dance without permission. I've seen so many young girls go from one dance style to another and i have to bite my tongue sometimes because i know they arent going about it in the right way. I can understand if you really want to dance another way than what you are, but have some respect!! :)

    Leave a comment:


  • ~+~Heya~+~
    replied
    Hmmm...I'm kinda having a hard time with this thread. :p I agree with both sides to a point. Yeah maybe we should ask permission to dance another tribes dance, but I know alot of ppl who havent. I think as long as you do it with respect and the way the dance was meant to be danced then more power to you! I know I would love to dance southern cloth, and have even asked a few southern ladies. And they all told me what I just said...If you know how to dance that style and can respect it then go ahead!

    I personally like when I see other tribes dancing jingle....it just shows that they have a interest in another tribes way and want to show it through thier dancing! Thats just my two cents though! :D


    OK heres my BIG question though...say I were to start dancing southern cloth...what would you southerners think if my design on my dress was a floral desing of my own tribe? (Ojibwe)
    Last edited by ~+~Heya~+~; 09-08-2003, 12:00 AM.

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  • bqueton
    replied
    I can agree with both sides of this discussion. In my opinion, in this new generation, there are two differents powwow worlds. The traditional powwows and the new contest powwows. It is wrong to adopt into a new style of dress or try to bring in a style that just doesn't belong at a traditional powwow. However, when these new powwows being run by Casinos and Corporations for profit, and the dancers only come to win money, all traditions are thrown away. People will adopt into styles that weren't given to them because it pays more money. At these new competion powwows there is nothing traditional about them. No traditional songs or even songs from that area. Personnally I turn my back and enjoy the dancing.

    However, at traditional powwows I am a strong believer of keeping the traditions. I am of Kiowa and Sac & Fox blood. And I am a singer. Each tribe has there traditional songs that I do not take away or out of there territory. Also I do not sing the songs of other tribes that I don't have the right to sing. Both tribes have songs that where put on the drum. Those are the songs that we take out into the "Intertribal" powwow.

    I am a very strong believer in Traditions. But when it comes to dancing for money. I believe the traditions just aren't there. If you are offended by the people who dance or sing at these competition powwows, then it's you who don't belong there. And if they come into your traditional area and try to do the same, feel free to knock 'em out!

    Leave a comment:


  • WhoMe
    replied
    _______

    Today's powwows are being taken over by a new generation of people and their contemporary ideologies. The values of honor and respect are being cast aside to honor and promote competition and the almighty dollar.

    It is generally acknowledged that yes, it takes money to survive in today's society.

    But just heed a few wise words of CAUTION:

    "When we, the first nations of this continent, sell the land we walk on > sell the water we drink > sell our ceremonies > sell the cloths we wear > sell the songs we sing and sell the language that we speak . . . then we will have nothing to call our own."

    "When all is sold, we will have no one to blame but ourselves."


    This is not "old school" . . . . . . it just "is."




    >>>>>>>>>>>>>:Cry :Cry :Cry<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

    Leave a comment:


  • ern_dawg2003
    replied
    buckskin dancing

    I don't care who or what tribe dances buckskin, the laydees make that dance look so damn keen and sexy, they should be # 1.

    Here are a few of my favorites
    #1 Karey Abbey -northern Baybee!!!!!!
    2 Danielle Sigwig
    3 Salina Todome - northern
    4 Dalynn Alley
    5 Delaine Alley-Snowball
    6 Justine McArthur -northern
    7 Tooky Hamilton-Brady
    8 Keri Bread
    9 Deanna Deere
    10 Shane Hughes- dayum fyne!!!
    11 Toni Tsatoke

    Oh did i Mentioned Karey Abbey -baybee!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • spicysouthern
    replied
    robin1 are navajos a southern or northern tribe? i seen a few navajos that dance southern in a oklahoma style pattern. are they considered a southern tribe its all kewl just asking

    Leave a comment:


  • ron red eagle
    replied
    For me personally, I dance Northern Traditional, because well.. I am Ojibwe. I may live here in the south, but I (in my opinion) don't have the right to dance their styles. So, if I go to a pw that is dancing non-northern traditional, I sit and watch and enjoy. Until I have learned to dance their styles, and/or given the privilage and honor to dance with them.

    RRE

    Leave a comment:


  • goose
    replied
    Like my dad always said" if it's not yours, leave it alone" ha ha
    We could really technical about this subject and it would probably offend alot of people, so just take it all with a grain of salt and be as respectful as you possibly can. I personally agree with rw and luvs, but then I know my origin of dance, being Ponca and Sac&Fox and growing up in those traditions.
    But alot of people are not of the tribes that originally pow wow dance, but would like to dance and take part. If that is the case, just ask and there are those that will help you attain the goal you are seeking.
    The arena is a wonderful place to make relationships and learn about other tribes. It is also strict at times and it is just best to gain as much knowledge as you possibly can therefore you won't offend anyone.
    Money entering the arena has been a twist in the equation, but think about it.....indians have always been competitive. From who could run the fastest, shoot the the straightest, etc. from since time began. We are a competive race, and the fact that the new area of competition is pow wow dancing, we give it our all. Nothing wrong with that. Just take it all into perspective and do what you feel in honorable to the arena and to yourself.
    It is not a country club, I hope not or else I forgot to pay my yearly dues...I've been too broke. LOL

    Leave a comment:

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