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  • A little help please

    I have Comanche ancestory, that is about all I know at the present time, as the search is still going on. I do not claim to be Comanche myself as there probably isnt enough native blood to prove, but this is still my family and I am very interested in their culture. The question I have is, are there any beaders that do traditional Comanche beading? If so would you be willing to share color and pattern ideas? also could someone tell me how I could make a large bead loom, I have tried several ways and its just not working out right. Thanks for any kind of help.

  • #2
    There sure are Comanche beadworkers.

    As for sharing patterns and colors that is a more delicate matter. Giving a pattern is giving a gift.


    How big a loom? (BTW loomwork isn't always a tradtional technique for a tribe)

    Comment


    • #3
      There's a long thread on loomwork already posted on this board. It will tell you about making a loom, etc.

      As for patterns and colors, . . . Well, I've found out that if you don't have a connection to a family with its own traditions, all you're left with is books. But, the good news is that books aren't bad. There are some for sale on this website or you can get them from most places that sell beads. If you don't want to spend the money, jot down the authors and titles of the books you find and try to get them at your local public library. If they don't own the books, they can get them for you through Interlibrary Loan -- just ask. I'd also suggest typing in "commanche beadwork" in your favorite search engine to see what websites you can find.

      Hope this is helpful.
      When you are born into this world you reach for either a bow and quiver, which is blessed by the Sun, our Grandfather, or you reach for an awl and sewing bag, which is blessed by the moon, our Grandmother. From that time on you will follow that vision and be blessed.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you for being so helpful. I hope I didnt upset anyone with that last post, I wasnt asking for spacific patterns, please forgive me if it sounded that way. I would like to have some "idea" of what would have been used traditionally. What kind of geometric or floral patterns might have been used, the colors that might have been used. I have learned that green was mostly used while in mourning (or is that wrong?) see I am still learning and I need all the help I can get, as all the family members from that side of my family are now passed on and I have noone to ask and no pictures of any of them for reference. It is such a sad thing that my great grand father was so ashamed of his wifes heritage that he even hid her "real" name from us. Anyway that is another story in its self....sorry bout that.

        I found the threads on the loom thanks alot.... i want to bead a piece to sew onto the back of a leather jacket so its going to measure about 18inches acrossed and 24inches long i think.

        Comment


        • #5
          First, I'm sorry, I didn't mean to sound as harsh as I did. I was trying to be brief not rude, but clearly I failed.

          You might consider a heddle loom for a piece that big. It takes a bit more to learn to use one, but you won't be fighting the needle wars all the time.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you so much for that. I didnt take you as being rude I thought maybe i had upset you, as I am still new to all of this and didnt know how to go about asking for help. I enjoy this forum and appreciate any help anyone offers.

            Thank you, Thank you, Thank you, and God Bless

            Comment


            • #7
              The other option, besides a heddle loom, for a piece that size is lane stitch (sometimes called "lazy" stitch). The advantage is that you wouldn't need so much equipment, especially if you're not expecting to do a lot of that kind of work. Any pattern you find for loom beading will work on either kind of loom or for lane stitch.
              When you are born into this world you reach for either a bow and quiver, which is blessed by the Sun, our Grandfather, or you reach for an awl and sewing bag, which is blessed by the moon, our Grandmother. From that time on you will follow that vision and be blessed.

              Comment


              • #8
                I was just looking up that stitch yesterday and never even thought about using it for this project, seems to me that it would be more secure than loom work especially if its to be worn quit a bit. because that is the stitch you string on the beads then go back and tack down the thread... am I right or is that another stitch???? You have to forgive me sometimes my senior MOMENTS last for HOURS...LOL


                Thanks for the help...you all are some great people!!!!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  It sounds like you're describing double needle applique. Lane stitch is done in rows or "lanes" (hence the name) that are curved slightly upward. You string the same number of beads in each lane.
                  When you are born into this world you reach for either a bow and quiver, which is blessed by the Sun, our Grandfather, or you reach for an awl and sewing bag, which is blessed by the moon, our Grandmother. From that time on you will follow that vision and be blessed.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you..... I will look up those stitches again....but how do you get them to curve if the beads are all strung at once......sits and scratches head over this one...LOL

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by AngelaK
                      ....but how do you get them to curve if the beads are all strung at once......
                      This works because the beads most often used for this stitch are oval. (See the thread on Delicas for more discussion.) And the beads are not jammed tight. There are tiny gaps for the anchor thread.

                      The attached picture (computer gods willing) shows the beads strung on one thread. Then a second needle is brought up through the backing and stiffener. It is passed over the thread with the beads, then put back down through the same hole. Make sense?
                      Attached Files

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        more

                        You can get any design you can draw - curves, straight lines, you name it. The kinds of work preduced by this basic techinque is widely varying.

                        You can make any design you can do in loom work or lane stitch. But the techniques is very fussy, it takes a lot of practice to line up perfect grids. The Shoshone, in particular, are masters of this. They have some amazing beadworkers up there, true artists.

                        You can also fill in colored geometric bocks, making a complex pattern with each colored area worked seperately from the others. Traditional Crow work is an excellent example of this. The work from that part of the country coorindinates with the rawhide painting and the quillwork. Men and women (and their horses) in their traditional clothes are a single unified composition.

                        You can also make textured work with thin lines that look like lace. Or with three dimensional scupltured areas. The Six Nations peoples are well known for this type of amazing work.

                        There is also the curvelinear work that has roots in several nations artistic traditions. In my experience this is the most common use of applique.

                        The picture below shows a unfinished piece I'm working on. (Please ingore the weird white paint where I corrected a drawing mistake.)
                        Attached Files

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          lane stitch

                          Lane stitch is the beadwork style most non-Ndns are familiar with. This is the stuff you see on most museum pieces and actors in westrens, LOL.

                          It produces a characteristic pattern of humped lanes in the overall piece. The backing is covered by lanes of adjacent rows of beads. Imagine two lines drawn on a piece of leather and a thread emerging from the leather on one line. Enough beads to fill the space between the lines is strung. Then the needle is slid halfway through the leather on the opposite line. Then the needle is brought back up through the leather a bead's width away. Then the same processes is repeated going the other direction.
                          Attached Files

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            more

                            It can be used to easily make geometric designs. It is also used by some artists to make curving designs or "figurative drawings". It can be mixed with other techniques, particularly to do backgrounds.

                            This the medium of many nations of the northern and southern plains. There is enormous variation in the types of designs, from subtle to bold, that can be made with this technique. (Can you tell it's my favorite?)

                            Below is another work in progress showing a tiny bit of lane stitch. If you look you even see my pencil lines, LOL.
                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              That is just amazing...... Thank you so much for taking the time to clear that up for me. Where are you from? Im down here in Florida. I wish I had someone close to me to show me how to do this stuff. Self teaching is hard to do.....

                              Again Thank you
                              Angela

                              Comment

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