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How to:the chevron variation of 3-drop gourd stitch

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  • How to:the chevron variation of 3-drop gourd stitch

    I was cleaning my hard drive and came across my drawings from my beading class. So I've decided to torture you with another former chem. teacher's lecture, LOL.

    The chevron variation of gourd stitch:

    This is a variation 3-drop gourd stitch that gives you 2 or more (more being and even number) inflection points where the direction of the "spiral" in the stitch changes.

    This gives you a number of different design options. Also, it is more forgiving on expansion and contraction, since it less prone to visible gaps, when you add or remove beads at the inflection points.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    How it goes together

    Each "row" of beads has three "layers" or "rounds", just like regular three drop. The difference is the spacing at the inflection or "turning" points isn't even.

    The first row looks something like this:
    Attached Files

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    • #3
      The second layer

      The second "layer" goes in something like this (note the place where there are two beads):
      Attached Files

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      • #4
        The third layer

        Then comes the third "layer":
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          Starting the next row

          The first "layer" of the next row:
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            Coming soon...

            What to do with the other side of that pesky round piece.

            How many beads do you need to start this dang thing anyway?

            Expanding.

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            • #7
              Figuring out the number of beads needed to start:

              First measure around the object you're beading with a string of beads of the same size. Round the number down to the nearest even number. Divide that number by 3 and figure out what the remainder is.

              The drawing below shows an example with 22 beads around. The right edge and left edge would obviously touch on a round object, LOL. 22/3 = 7 with a remainder of 1. When the resulting of the division, in this case 7, is odd one of the beads will be a turning point.

              In the drawing below, lines mark the turning points and the green "beads" are the beads in the starting "layer" of the starting row. When the remainder is 1 the starting "layer" will look like the below drawing.
              Attached Files

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              • #8
                This drawing below shows an example with 24 beads around. The right edge and left edge would obviously touch on a round object, LOL. 24/3 = 8 with a remainder of 0. When the remainder is 0 the starting "layer" will look like the below drawing.
                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  This drawing below shows an example with 26 beads around. The right edge and left edge would obviously touch on a round object, LOL. 26/3 = 8 with a remainder of 2. When the remainder is 2 the starting "layer" will look like the below drawing.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    thank you for sharing ...you make learning new things easy.

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                    • #11
                      Expanding

                      You can expand just like you drop in regular three drop or add at the inflection points. the bunch of posts will show two ways to do that.

                      Step 1:




                      (PS Thanks AngelaK :) )
                      Attached Files

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                      • #12
                        step 2:
                        Attached Files

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                        • #13
                          Expanding part dueax

                          When the v goes the other way. Step 1:
                          Attached Files

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                          • #14
                            step 2:
                            Attached Files

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                            • #15
                              Step 3 and done at last

                              Step 3:

                              Be aware that the two methods of expanding add width at different rates. The up wards V's add more slowly than the downward V's. So to keep even tension it may be necessary to add more often at one point than the other.
                              Attached Files

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