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How to:the chevron variation of 3-drop gourd stitch

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  • starwmn4
    replied
    Hello! I'm so glad you are still here:) I hve been bizy workin on orders and taking care of my lil one, but at some point soon here I plan to learn this style if possible! I'm experienced at 3drop, but hve anxieties about bein able to learn this. I've been lookin for anyone who knws it for at least 3 yrs nw, NO ONE I knw does this. In fact I think I've only ever seen one piece made with chevron style outside of this Whispering Wind mag my sister has. Anyway, I'll be back and looking for you here! Thx so much!

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  • OLChemist
    replied
    Yes, I'm still here. Sorry for the delay in responding. My folks had their 50th wedding anniversary and I've been there or making the 3000 mile round trip drive, LOL.

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  • starwmn4
    replied
    Can OLchemist be reached still? I would luv to pick ur brain more about this If possible!

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  • OLChemist
    replied
    What I failed to mention is that if your beads are big, 13/0 or larger subtracting is almost always better.

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  • OLChemist
    replied
    If I understand you correctly (a questionable proposition at 4:20am, LOL) you are asking about conventional 3-drop gourd stitch.

    To get patterns in three drop to work out well the number of beads in a roun must be an even integer multiple of three. I figure out the number of beads I will need as follows:

    I string a bunch of beads and wrap them around the object to be beaded. I count the number of beads. Because in 3 drop a single row of beads is made of three "sub-rows", I divide that number by three. If the number is even and there is no remainder everything is cool. This never happens, LOL. So here is a loose rule of thumb I use: If the number is even and the remainder is 2 or less, I put that even number of beads in each "sub-row". The slack will work itself out. If the number is odd and the remainder is 1 or greater, then I add one to the number -- so I get an even number -- to the "sub-row". The catch comes when the number is odd and the remainder is zero, then you have to use your judgement about whether to add or subtract a bead.

    Examples:

    Total number of beads is 25; 25/3 = 8 with a remainder of 1. So I use 8 beads in a "sub-row". My finished row will have a total of 24 beads.

    Total number of beads is 29; 29/3 = 9 with a remainder of 2. I use 10 beads in the "sub row" and my finished row will have 30.

    Total number of beads is 27; 27/3 = 9 with a remainder of 0. If the object is wrapped in soft leather I'll use 8 beads in a "sub-row". If it is hard, I'll look my beads over and make sure I don't have any unusually small or large beads on the measurement string and remeasure. Or I'll consider padding. If I just can't fix it I use 8 and hope for the best. Adding may make the beadwork loose, although this is not always true.

    Anyway, I hope I answered the right question.

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  • paulflores
    replied
    help

    Ok I went to work today and lost everything I done over the weekend,I found some where on this site that someone said for a three drop count your beads around and / them by 3, subtract that number .........So my question is this start w/the remainder then add your balance or what? Afriend said take your number and add 6 but has to be/ by 3 .any help please.......like I said WORK causes DAIN BRAMAGE!

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  • SingingDeer
    replied
    I can't wait to try this one. Thanks for the excellent instructions and graphics!

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  • andre
    replied
    An excellent thread indeed, and a topic near and dear to my heart!

    OLChemist your pics look great! Some time back I purchased a Wispering Wind craft annual #3 which introduced me to the chevron style. Since then, I can't recall doing even 1 row of any other style of gourd stitch. As you mentioned, this truly is much better for expansion than standard 3 drop, and I am working on a couple of flat fans with tapered handles right now.

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  • frybreadboogie72
    replied
    Wow, thanks for these all the post OLChemist...sure is helpful!!! I appreciate the pictures of each step!!!

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  • OLChemist
    replied
    Step 3 and done at last

    Step 3:

    Be aware that the two methods of expanding add width at different rates. The up wards V's add more slowly than the downward V's. So to keep even tension it may be necessary to add more often at one point than the other.
    Attached Files

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  • OLChemist
    replied
    step 2:
    Attached Files

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  • OLChemist
    replied
    Expanding part dueax

    When the v goes the other way. Step 1:
    Attached Files

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  • OLChemist
    replied
    step 2:
    Attached Files

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  • OLChemist
    replied
    Expanding

    You can expand just like you drop in regular three drop or add at the inflection points. the bunch of posts will show two ways to do that.

    Step 1:




    (PS Thanks AngelaK :) )
    Attached Files

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  • AngelaK
    replied
    thank you for sharing ...you make learning new things easy.

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