Sumo

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Beginner rosette question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Beginner rosette question

    My first loom bead project is coming along nicely, but I want to start a rosette for practice. You all do such inspiring work -I think I am totally hooked on beading now!

    What should a beginner choose for material? Right now I have size 10 and 11 beads, but I have size 13 Charlottes on order from CCTP. I don't know what to sew the beads onto for good practice with the stitches. All advice gladly accepted - thanks!

  • #2
    I like to do rosettes on file folders or heavy stock paper. I coat the front and back with clear finger nail polish for added strength. Then when I'm done, a little E6000 and a piece of buckskin protect the stitches.
    A tater tot is worth a thousand fries.

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow! Thank you for the advice. I would never have thought to bead on file folders, but it makes great sense . . . I had been wondering how it would be even possible on floppy material!

      Please tell me what E6000 is - I assume a glue or such? Thank you again.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by andre
        I like to do rosettes on file folders or heavy stock paper. I coat the front and back with clear finger nail polish for added strength. Then when I'm done, a little E6000 and a piece of buckskin protect the stitches.
        Really - you use file folders? What happens if it gets wet, and over time doesn't the paper start to disintegrate. I know that allot of scrapbooking crafts are done on "acid" free paper for that very reason. No offense ment, just seems really strange to me to put so much time and effort into something and then have it fall apart in a couple of years.

        No substitute for the real thing "buckskin" or even use "baby cloth" as we call it - but paper or file folders? I just don't know about that one. Again, no offense ment.
        Where the spirit does not work with the hand there is no art." - Leonardo Da Vinci

        "I found I could say things with my beads that I couldn't say any other way....things I had no words for" - Eva McAdams Eastern Shoshone

        Comment


        • #5
          The file folder is one I have never heard of. Using small beads like 13 cuts requires a very thin needle. I would think the needles would bend or break very easy. Also quite a bit harder to punch the needle through than cloth or leather. But what ever works for you, more power to ya and stick with it.
          I have beaded over 100 rosettes in my life. In fact it is my favorite thing to bead. About 12 years ago someone showed me what they use and I’ve stuck with it. I use the thickest, heavy weight “interfacing” material. I then put it on a small embroidery hoop. This keeps the material flat and in great shape while I’m beading. After it is complete, I cut a piece from a thin plastic sheet (you can find these at any craft store). I use a thin layer of “Leather glue” and bond this to the rosette. I then take a piece of buckskin and leather glue that to the back. Trim around the edge rather close, then edge bead it. Wa-La complete!
          There are many other ways that I’ve seen people do, so try several ways and find what is comfortable to you!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Cutbead Queen
            Really - you use file folders? What happens if it gets wet, and over time doesn't the paper start to disintegrate. I know that allot of scrapbooking crafts are done on "acid" free paper for that very reason. No offense ment, just seems really strange to me to put so much time and effort into something and then have it fall apart in a couple of years.
            No offense taken. You have a valid point, but the glue I use bonds the buckskin to both the paper and the thread, so even if the folder does disintegrate, the glue will be holding the thread to the buckskin. I have several rosettes done this way, and I haven't had problems with any of them. They aren't that old, but they are holding up much better than I expected. I think the nail polish helps to strengthen the paper against water damage and rot. I love to lazy stitch half way into buckskin, and I can do it very well, but rosettes on hide I never got the hang of.
            A tater tot is worth a thousand fries.

            Comment


            • #7
              "what ever works for you"

              Originally posted by Drippin With Beads
              The file folder is one I have never heard of. Using small beads like 13 cuts requires a very thin needle. I would think the needles would bend or break very easy. Also quite a bit harder to punch the needle through than cloth or leather. But what ever works for you, more power to ya and stick with it.
              I have beaded over 100 rosettes in my life. In fact it is my favorite thing to bead. About 12 years ago someone showed me what they use and I’ve stuck with it. I use the thickest, heavy weight “interfacing” material. I then put it on a small embroidery hoop. This keeps the material flat and in great shape while I’m beading. After it is complete, I cut a piece from a thin plastic sheet (you can find these at any craft store). I use a thin layer of “Leather glue” and bond this to the rosette. I then take a piece of buckskin and leather glue that to the back. Trim around the edge rather close, then edge bead it. Wa-La complete!
              There are many other ways that I’ve seen people do, so try several ways and find what is comfortable to you!
              I also like using embroidery hoops for just about everything I bead. I have several different sizes for the different jobs I and my daughter do.
              It's How We're All Connected !!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Thank you ALL for responding to my question - I have started a rosette tonight on a piece of file folder. It's working out great, but I will also try the other methods you have each recommended . . .
                I assumed that andre's method of glueing the rosette would secure all the threads and it wouldn't matter if the paper didn't last forever - almost like doing applique work with the water soluble interfacing from Sulky.

                Question for Drippin with Beads: Do you use interfacing that is woven or the non-woven kind? You have also given me an idea to use Timtex interfacing - are you familiar with that?

                Comment


                • #9
                  The interfacing I use is non-woven. I don’t like to bead on any material that is woven. If you have interwoven lanes of fiber, you run the risk of your stitching becoming loose. To see what I mean, take a piece of canvas, push a needle half way through. Now move the needle back and forth. You will see that the fibers of the canvas will open up creating a hole. This can really cause problems when you are working with a larger piece like a vest or a Women’s Northern Tradish cape. As you are beading, pulling the stitches tight and the handling of the piece will have an effect on your finished piece. Baby pad material is also great stuff for all your beading needs.

                  I have not heard of “Timetex”. Is it supposed to ‘Take a lickin and keep on tickin’?!?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for the advice - I figured you meant non-woven, but have learned not to assume too much!

                    Are you familiar with fabric bowls? Timtex is the usual stiffener for making these. It was developed by a woman who supposedly couldn't find stiff enough interfacing for Irish step-dancing costumes she made and she got tired of fusing multiple layers together. She now markets it herself. It is very heavy, and washable and steam press-able, too.

                    I have a modest home sewing business and so bought 75 yards of Timtex wholesale. If you would like to try some send me a private message and I'd be more than glad to put some pieces in the mail for you.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I just want to back up what andre said about using file folder. Everyone has their own way and if it works for you then go with it. I use file folder in the same way, coating with clear polish. I tell this to a lot of folks and the same responce comes back, "Won't it fall apart if it gets wet?" I guess if I were on the powwow cruise and somehow went overboard and drifted for a week or two, then yes, the beadwork would probably fall apart, but that's the least of my worries at that point.

                      All of the medallions on my fancy dance outfit are done on file folder. I danced like a mad man in Oklahoma for several years, that beadwork went through a lot and absorbed tons of sweat. The medallions are practically brand new if you look at them. The loom work on D nymo has seen better days though. So I can verify that beaded in paper CAN hold up.

                      Last note, once people actually see the beadwork or watch me doing it they get converted pretty quick. I even amazed a guy who swears to using cloth and hoops for EVERYTHING. Although I don't think he will try paper anytime soon, he was impressed.

                      I've posted some medalions in a previous rosette thread, try looking through the archives if you want to see them or I'll repost.
                      Last edited by BeadMan; 06-18-2005, 10:50 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you for adding your thoughts, Beadman. I have LOVED the work of yours I've seen photos of.

                        I did try my first rosette on file folder, as andre suggested, but as it was just for practice, to learn the running stitch and bead placement I didn't coat the folder with nail polish - but I will next time.

                        I'd like to add one additional positive note about using file folders, from an absolute beginner's point of view. I found that it made checking the evenness of my stitches possible - white thread on white interfacing (which I tried the next day) was really hard to see, but white thread on manilla folders was a breeze - it reminded me of sewing on those old-time sewing cards I had as a kid. . .

                        Thanks again to everyone who has taken the time to respond!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thank You

                          Thank you for this post.I haven't started beading yet.But after reading what everyone said,iwant to start right away. Again thank you.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You may have figured this out on your own, but one thing that has not been mentioned is how to use the paper/folders to bead on. Say you are using running stitch, 4 beads at a time. Lay the beads where you want them and then poke the holes from the upper side of the work. I poke the hole at the end of the 4 beads and in between bead #2and 3. then you do the regular stitches through the two holes you have just punched with your needle.

                            As for using small beads, I have done belt buckles in small beads (16/o and smaller) and have used a #16 needle and it is just fine.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              MEZZO!!! YES I know of that stuff!!! A friend of mine gave me a small piece to work with and I LOVE IT! It's alot like the stiffy felt, but it's not felt.. more like nylon that's been felted together. It's some awesome stuff! She buys hers online for 5 dollars a yard I believe. I told her next time she orders to get me about 3 yards and I'd happily pay her for it.
                              Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

                              Comment

                              Join the online community forum celebrating Native American Culture, Pow Wows, tribes, music, art, and history.

                              Related Topics

                              Collapse

                              • storm122366
                                Beading Help
                                by storm122366
                                I am starting a new traditional set of beadwork. I have been using buckskin as a material to bead on but it moves around too much. Does anyone have any advice on what is the best material for lane stitch items. I had thought about using canvas, but did not know if it would show too much after sewing...
                                10-20-2008, 02:07 PM
                              • littleswan
                                Starting a new men's northern set
                                by littleswan
                                Hello, I am starting a men's northern set and I had a few beadwork questions regarding what to bead on, and the best way to construct certain things where it looks clean, professional, and will last a few years. I am not new to beading, but I only know how to bead on leather and deer sinew, which isn't...
                                09-09-2012, 06:38 PM
                              • edmontonnativemommy
                                Best Material to Bead On..
                                by edmontonnativemommy
                                My needles keep breaking!! I have upholstry canvas that i have been using to bead on and yes i am very new to beading and was told to find the sturdiest material. I just dont know what i am doing wrong. If i use a stronger needle the beeds wont fit and if i use my beading needles they break.. The beadds...
                                08-07-2008, 05:17 PM
                              • 5lilndns
                                Where to start????
                                by 5lilndns
                                Wheeww!!! I just finished my first set of beaded hairties. Yeyahhh!!! lol This is also the first time I've used barrettes in the back instead of ties, is this better? I sewed them in instead of just making slits, is this ok? Now onto the yolk. HELP!!!!! I have no idea where to start. Do I bead thru...
                                12-31-2006, 10:39 AM
                              • chumus
                                Beading a Marine Corp Logo
                                by chumus
                                I'm beading a Marine Corp logo for my dad as a gift. I was wondering if anyone has any advice on what colors I should use for the eagle that stands at the top of globe in the design. Should I go with black and silver or should use the natural colors of the eagle. I was also thinking of using gold. I...
                                03-16-2013, 08:21 PM

                              Trending

                              Collapse

                              There are no results that meet this criteria.

                              Sidebar Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X