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  • Beading books

    I was wondering whether it would be ok to start a thread on books about beading . . .

    I look through the Crazy Crow Trading Post catalogue and drool over SO many books, but don't know which might be truly helpful and which are just 'quick peek' quality.

    So I thought maybe we could discuss your thoughts about some of your books here . . .

    I'll start with the one I have . . .

  • #2
    Beading in the Native American Tradition, by David Dean $24.95 US Interweave Press

    (PLEASE NOTE - I just noticed this book on Amazon for $16.47 new, so I wanted to let everyone know just in case you think about buying it . . . )

    I bought this book and my first beads at a PowWow a month ago or so. I think it's beautifully illustrated and the stitch and loom drawings seem to be very clear and easy to understand. There are blank graphs in the back which could be photocopied and also some which are filled in with examples of possible patterns in the different stitches. I found that particularly helpful as I was trying to understand gourd stitch when I first read about it. There are also many photos of both historical and contemporary pieces of beadwork.

    I would recommend this book highly.
    Last edited by Mezzobean; 06-24-2005, 08:20 AM. Reason: Different price!!

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    • #3
      Now, I'm looking for recommendations for books about beading earrings - any thoughts?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mezzobean
        Beading in the Native American Tradition, by David Dean $24.95 US Interweave Press

        I bought this book and my first beads at a PowWow a month ago or so. I think it's beautifully illustrated and the stitch and loom drawings seem to be very clear and easy to understand. There are blank graphs in the back which could be photocopied and also some which are filled in with examples of possible patterns in the different stitches. I found that particularly helpful as I was trying to understand gourd stitch when I first read about it. There are also many photos of both historical and contemporary pieces of beadwork.

        I would recommend this book highly.
        I have this book also, and it is very nice. I also have met David Dean a few times. He is incredibly knowlegable and is a heck of a nice guy too!

        I have beaded a few pairs of earrings for my ex-girlfriend. I don't know if she ever wore them or not, so I don't know if women would want to wear these, but here is a link to the site I used as a reference:
        http://www.shira.net/make-earrings.htm
        http://jewelrymaking.about.com/library/bl052400.htm
        A tater tot is worth a thousand fries.

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        • #5
          I just checked out the links you recommended - they look really useful so I bookmarked 'em. Thank you!

          I'm glad you like the book I recommended - and I'm doubly glad to hear that David Dean is a nice guy . . . makes reading the book even more enjoyable.

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          • #6
            for beaded earrings.. any of the books by Veon's Creations
            Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

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            • #7
              I am SO excited - I took my birthday $ and ordered some beads and books from CCTP, including one earring one (before I started this thread) and the order just came - and it turns out the book is by Veon . . . yippee! It's the Vol. 1 brick stitch one . . . Guess I know what I'll be doing later tonight - listening to PowWow radio and tryin' out the book . . .

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              • #8
                Joel Monture's "Complete Guide to Traditional Native American Beadwork" is another good one. The author is a former professor of tradtional arts at the IAIA. In my opinion the books suffers a bit from being a hair on the dogmatic side. He does touch on some interesting things, like the role of artist attitude in the production of artwork and developing good work habits.

                http://www.iaiancad.org/store/pdetai...31&type=single

                Personally, I find the Full Circle "How To Bead" series works well for beginners. I bought a couple, after I had been beading for about ten years, and they have a some good close ups to show how stitches are done.

                I consider some of the historical/ethnographic work (some of the BAE bulletins for example) and museum catalogs a very good resource for studying the evolution of particular tribal aestetics (sorry can't spell that without a spell checker). Museum postcards and auction catalogs can provide more sources. Also collections of modern works, photos and surch are important too. I found that being urban I was not immersed in the Native artistic environment and when I was it was often other tribes. This is left me having to suppliment what I saw around me with other sources to learn the design vocabulary of beadwork (not copying designs, but learning the conventions of line, shape and color). I think this is a problem for more than a few would be beadworkers.

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                • #9
                  I will check out the book you mention . . . right now I'm just learning stitches and basic pattern alignment and things like that. I am not Native American, so am faced with the additional challenge of not having any tribal resources. I have a friend who is Abenaki who has given me some pointers for my loom work, and I look at ALL the beadwork I can get my eyes on at the PowWows around here and on this site . . .

                  It's interesting to me that you mention 'design vocabulary' because I was thinking along those lines and feeling pretty certain that I will have to learn that vocabulary through pictures - which is one of the reasons I started this thread.

                  Thanks again for your input . . .

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                  • #10
                    Sadie Starrs' book is like that OL.. it's got photos close up step by step... Mezzo, if you want to learn how to do beadwork simple to advanced, this is an awesome book. It's pretty costly, around 30.00 but so well worth it.

                    http://beadwork.about.com/library/we...adiestarr1.htm
                    Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by OLChemist
                      Joel Monture's "Complete Guide to Traditional Native American Beadwork" is another good one. The author is a former professor of tradtional arts at the IAIA. In my opinion the books suffers a bit from being a hair on the dogmatic side. He does touch on some interesting things, like the role of artist attitude in the production of artwork and developing good work habits.

                      http://www.iaiancad.org/store/pdetai...31&type=single

                      I consider some of the historical/ethnographic work (some of the BAE bulletins for example) and museum catalogs a very good resource for studying the evolution of particular tribal aestetics (sorry can't spell that without a spell checker). Museum postcards and auction catalogs can provide more sources. Also collections of modern works, photos and surch are important too. I found that being urban I was not immersed in the Native artistic environment and when I was it was often other tribes. This is left me having to suppliment what I saw around me with other sources to learn the design vocabulary of beadwork (not copying designs, but learning the conventions of line, shape and color). I think this is a problem for more than a few would be beadworkers.
                      Mezzo: First of all I would like to start off by saying that I'm really impressed with your first beading project, I just went through the gallery your barrett looks great and to think it was done on a file folder? I'm gonna have to try it.

                      I think the book that OC has mentioned above is one of my favorites. Joel Monture really has a reverance for beadwork.

                      Coming up with new design ideas is a road block for every beadworker, new and old. I agree with you OC that it is very important not to encourage anyone to copy designs, but instead to really reach inside yourself and make up a few of your own. They mean something then.

                      My sister in-law and I even used a book from the library on ancient egyptian art as inspiration when designing her outfit. (My ol' tradish gramma - just rolls her eyes. LOL) She loved the color combinations and I must say, her buckskin is really beautiful.
                      Where the spirit does not work with the hand there is no art." - Leonardo Da Vinci

                      "I found I could say things with my beads that I couldn't say any other way....things I had no words for" - Eva McAdams Eastern Shoshone

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                      • #12
                        Thank you for the kind words, Cutbead Queen! I really liked beading on the file folder - I did coat it with clear nail polish as andre and BeadMan suggested. However, the next time I coated some folder pieces I went outside, as my office smelled liked I'd been sniffin' glue for a whole day after I did it in here! I figured I'd coat up a sheet of it then cut it to use as I need it, so now I've got some for my next few projects . . .

                        I found the book you and OC suggest on Amazon, but I will have to wait a while before I get it . . . that's ok though, because as I said, I'm still learning the basic stitches and such, and the language of NA beading will come later after my technique improves.`

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                        • #13
                          Blackbear I just ordered Sadie Starr's book used from one of the Amazon listed affiliates - incl. S&H it was a bit over $26. Amazon said there was a 4-6 week wait for new copies!

                          I'm really thankful to have the recommendations from all of you experienced beaders!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Cutbead Queen
                            My sister in-law and I even used a book from the library on ancient egyptian art as inspiration when designing her outfit. (My ol' tradish gramma - just rolls her eyes. LOL) She loved the color combinations and I must say, her buckskin is really beautiful.
                            :) I keep imagining those turn of the century (19th) artists running home, after seeing all those oriental rugs of which the Victorians were so fond, to use their new inspiration in their latest design. Artists have always been the first to take and use design elements and technology from other cultures.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by OLChemist
                              :) I keep imagining those turn of the century (19th) artists running home, after seeing all those oriental rugs of which the Victorians were so fond, to use their new inspiration in their latest design. Artists have always been the first to take and use design elements and technology from other cultures.
                              Slightly off-topic, but what you say reminded me of my potter friend, who travels every few years to remote villages around the world to study the animal designs used locally in pottery and brings the designs to her work that year, always crediting the source of the inspiration. I'd been thinking about how some of her work would translate into excellent beaded designs . . .

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