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Why do we wax the thread when beading?

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  • Native 1
    replied
    this is so crazy but I lost both of my beeswax..and there was no regular un waxed d thread so I am going to try that silamade? thread..I'll let you know how..that goes..for now I am using unwaxed thread..its a pain..but...

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  • Czechy
    replied
    Yeah, I tried Silamide once. It is very "wiry" and a pain in the butt to use. Tangled a lot even with wax because it is so "curly". Kevlar I have also tried. The knot used with it is called the Surgeon's Knot. Kevlar is okay for bugle and other sharp-edged beads but I would not use it for anything else.

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  • OLChemist
    replied
    Originally posted by BeadMan View Post
    I only say that to make OlChemist think I'm smart.
    LOL

    I've had a heck of a time getting knots to stay in the stuff without the thread cutting itself. There are funny knots you have to use, but since I flunked boy sprouts(in part 'cause I'm a girl, LOL)... There are people who swear by this stuff for bugle beads, since it resists cutting on the sharp edges.

    Silamide and C-LON are all the rage in the non-Native beading world. And there is a new thread from Japan called KO, which some folks are starting to carry.

    Silamide is a multiply, pre-conditioned nylon. I find the stuff hard to thread through the needle. Too much work for the extra fray resistance, IMHO. But, if you hate starting a new thread in gourd stitch worse than pushing a difficult thread through a needle, it might be a good thing to try. I know people who just love the stuff.

    I think C-LON is another type of nylon thread. Several artists claim it's better than Nymo and about the same as Silamide.

    I have no idea about the KO. I've only seen it list in a couple of catalogs.

    There is gel-spun polypropylene. This is very fine and very tough for its weight and thickness. However, it frays like crazy. Also, some vendors tell you to keep it out of the sun -- not a good thing in powwow regalia.

    For me, I'll stick with Nymo. I'm too cheap to pay for high-tech threads when I can get Nymo to work just fine with a little care. But your milage on the above opinion may vary.

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  • BeadMan
    replied
    Originally posted by crazywolf View Post
    Just wonderin...

    Anyone ever use Kevlar thread? I have tried it and find that it freys a lot less, and is stronger than regular nylon

    Anyone else use it?

    Derek
    I have used Kevlar before and didn't think much of it. It was alright, not much different, just more expensive.

    Kevlar is in a sense a type of Nylon (polyamide). It is an Aramid (aromatic polyamide). So waxing should have about the same effect. I do not know if a bonded version of the thread is available as with Nymo.

    I only say that to make OlChemist think I'm smart.

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  • crazywolf
    replied
    Just wonderin...

    Anyone ever use Kevlar thread? I have tried it and find that it freys a lot less, and is stronger than regular nylon

    Anyone else use it?

    Derek

    Leave a comment:


  • Czechy
    replied
    I've used both Thread Heaven and beeswax. For lazy stitch I prefer the wax because it gives a thicker coating. I feel the stuff helps protect the threads from all kinds of things including moisture and whatnot. In addition, the wax helps fill up the bead holes which gives lazy stitched beading some stiffness.

    Many, many moons ago I tried beading with waxed dental floss. Not good. Frayed like no tomorrow.

    Leave a comment:


  • J.L. Benet
    replied
    Originally posted by randyinkc View Post
    Thread Heaven!!!!!!

    Bee's can keep their wax....
    I use the stuff as well. My wife swears by it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fat Albert
    replied
    Waxing is great after you get done with an applique job because when you hit it with an iron it flattens out and the wax sets the pattern to hold like hair gel... sort of. Wax a lot for a better project!

    Leave a comment:


  • OLChemist
    replied
    Originally posted by BeadMan View Post
    It is a sacred sacrifice to the long chain hydrocarbon gods.
    It does my black little p-chemist heart good to see there is another person making nerd jokes in here, LOL.

    Leave a comment:


  • Native 1
    replied
    Originally posted by randyinkc View Post
    Thread Heaven!!!!!!

    Bee's can keep their wax....
    lol...I am a big fan of waxing my thread..although when I couldn't find all of my what 3 discs of wax..I continued to bead without it...but I wouldn't recommend it..its just one of those things you gotta have to bead...sometimes I go crazee looking for wax...lol...or if I should forget it at home I buy another one at the pw...

    Leave a comment:


  • randyinkc
    replied
    Thread Heaven!!!!!!

    Bee's can keep their wax....

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Originally posted by BeadMan
    Waxing thread is actually an ancient ritual to cleanse the beadworker. It is a sacred sacrifice to the long chain hydrocarbon gods. It also wards off evil spirits such as Ocrap'aknot, Snagemon Chairleg, and Frizin Dewrongplace. Most importantly, it keeps the bead needle from rusting.


    There's just some thread that you HAVE to wax. But some to me seems prewaxed. The wax doesn't seem to stick, it doesn't fray, and isn't prone to knots. I have two big spools of it. I also have a big spool I inherited from my grandma and it can't be used without wax.

    Leave a comment:


  • BeadMan
    replied
    Waxing thread is actually an ancient ritual to cleanse the beadworker. It is a sacred sacrifice to the long chain hydrocarbon gods. It also wards off evil spirits such as Ocrap'aknot, Snagemon Chairleg, and Frizin Dewrongplace. Most importantly, it keeps the bead needle from rusting.

    Leave a comment:


  • subeeds
    replied
    They've hit the nail on the head. It's a LOT easier to get knots out of waxes thread, than unwaxed thread. there have been times when I should have re-waxed my hread, but didn't, only to spend what seemed like hours trying to get a knot out. right now, I'm working on a poject using size D NYMO. It's white in color and seems to me that it's slicker than the colored NYMO thread. Waxing gives it some texture so it doesn't slip as much.

    Leave a comment:


  • between2worlds
    replied
    I find if I don't wax my thread it tends to get frayed from pulling a whole length of thread in and out of the cloth repetitively (or back and forth through beads on a loom). Heavily waxed thread also seems more resistant to breaking when used to hold beads to a piece that gets a lot of wear and tear (like mocs).

    Initially I did it because that was what I was taught. I have kept on using wax because waxed thread just seems to work better. (Also it is much easier to get tangles out of waxed thread!)

    Leave a comment:

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