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Computers and beading

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  • subeeds
    replied
    I tried the easybead designer. I liked it. However, I liked my designs better when I did them with paper and colored pencils. I usually just write the patterns down instead of sketch them. I did one the other day and it looks like "3 bead brick base connected to 5 brick base by x number of bead net". If I don't look at it again for 6 months, I'll still know what it means and what plans I have for it.

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  • superndngyrl
    replied
    yea i'm in front of a computer all day too besides its fun to me -- playing with computer programs and my designs ...ways i like spending my time. :D

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  • trob226
    replied
    I've been practicing rosettes (I'm a newbie),and I've just been planning them in my head, but usually I get them part done and change my plan because something appeals to me as I go along. I like seeing things "plan themselves."

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  • Czechy
    replied
    I don't plan my beadwork much beyond the basics because I usually end up changing something anyway.

    Even so, I do have BeadPlan, an old computer program with graphs for peyote, brick and loom work. The coolest part was that you could scan in a photo or picture and the program would map it into beads for you. My disk is now collecting dust since I find it faster to just whip out the graph paper and colored pens. Even that I only do rarely since I have been beading for so long now that I can just work on the fly without needing to map stuff out.

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  • chazziff
    replied
    Originally posted by kiyaanii mom View Post
    Hummmm I really like these ideas.

    I usually free hand the outline of my design onto what I'm doing, then get started. I use to free hand create a color drawing of my design then follow it when I'm beading.

    Maybe I can use the computer to sketchout some ideas I have. It would be cool to shrink or enlarge a design to see how it will look in a certain place.

    Hummmmmm......
    i do my designs i guess the old fashioned way .. on graph paper, a scrap of paper (sometimes something jus comes to me lol), a post-it .. lol .. and i scan that into my computer using my printer/scanner/copier. and then i can manipulate it .. expand it, shrink it, reverse it .. make copies of it.

    that way i can make the design whatever size i need for a particular project ..

    i've tried some of those beadwork programs .. kinda bore me .. sorry they do. but i'll try the one betweentwoworlds linked to .. it looks very interesting ..

    Leave a comment:


  • between2worlds
    replied
    *shrug* some of us are stuck looking at a computer all day. I like to get the design out of my head and saved once I've figured it out. Fear of old timer's disease maybe?

    The computer also lets me "sketch better" - I have advanced arthritis in my hands, trying to draw anything out has literally become a pain I can do without. It also saves my hands for more important things.... like beading.

    Finally - many who bead know that most designs are suggestions anyway and even a detailed road map should not be confused with reality. Variables like bead uniformity and a person's personal style (how "tightly" one beads - whether loom or applique can make ROWS of difference in a large piece) mean being able to render a pattern which can be perfectly duplicated is nigh on to impossible.

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  • BeadMan
    replied
    Brian,

    You hit the nail on the head, finally someone who "gets it." All you computer designers can draw, sketch, scan, copy, crop, and resize all day long. I'll have my project half finished before you ever touch a bead.

    Come on, this isn't rocket science, it's beadwork. Don't worry about making everything so perfect. Perfection is a bore. It's alright to sketch out an idea and work on spacing or alignment, but don't doodle out every blasted bead in color!

    Leave a comment:


  • TKMJ Productions
    replied
    Originally posted by kiyaanii mom View Post
    Hummmm I really like these ideas.

    I usually free hand the outline of my design onto what I'm doing, then get started. I use to free hand create a color drawing of my design then follow it when I'm beading.

    Maybe I can use the computer to sketchout some ideas I have. It would be cool to shrink or enlarge a design to see how it will look in a certain place.

    Hummmmmm......
    That's what I do. If it works out, I use the pattern. If not, I save it and give the pattern away to someone who can use it. Sometimes, I'll even make up the work and give that away with the pattern in case someone wants to make a reverse for the other side of the regulia. I'm finding that there is so much you can do with the computer and beadwork.

    But I often wonder what some people can do with the work of others. I have seen some great freehand beadwork that can be scanned and copied with the computer to make an exact pattern. So I think all of us must be very careful not to make copies of the work of others. I feel that every piece you make must be from your research and heart. Copying someone elses work is wrong. Just something to keep in mind.
    Last edited by TKMJ Productions; 02-22-2007, 07:00 PM. Reason: more spelling errors

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  • kiyaanii mom
    replied
    Hummmm I really like these ideas.

    I usually free hand the outline of my design onto what I'm doing, then get started. I use to free hand create a color drawing of my design then follow it when I'm beading.

    Maybe I can use the computer to sketchout some ideas I have. It would be cool to shrink or enlarge a design to see how it will look in a certain place.

    Hummmmmm......

    Leave a comment:


  • TallmanFL
    replied
    I just start beading. I think beading can be overplanned.

    I go for a general design and make sure it is balanced, but I dont plan out every bead.

    Who else does beading the same way?

    Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagle Plumes
    replied
    Originally posted by superndngyrl View Post
    well... as a shortcut in instructions...

    If you draw out 1/4 of the design, and scan/take a picture of it. Then use photoshop and mirror the other parts. Then print it out to your dimensions. I'm sure there's an easier way but i'm a photoshop nut so thats how I do it. If you don't like it you can either edit it photoshop or erase it and redraw it, take new picture, repeat.
    I had not thught of that, but either way ive not used photoshop lol
    A while aga I lost a beaded earing and ws wanting a new one so last nite I was getting out pencil and paper to draw another one. My Husband asked hun what are you doing? I said well Im needing a new earing , he then said do you want your paperin color? or black & white? I said either why? he reached up put the match to the one I lost in it " minus the post I lost it too lol" And he coppied it rite in our color printer/copy machine! now im just ready to bead. Now I have a head band in my head that wants to come out and im going to use the same methode to get it on paper and bead away

    Leave a comment:


  • superndngyrl
    replied
    well... as a shortcut in instructions...

    If you draw out 1/4 of the design, and scan/take a picture of it. Then use photoshop and mirror the other parts. Then print it out to your dimensions. I'm sure there's an easier way but i'm a photoshop nut so thats how I do it. If you don't like it you can either edit it photoshop or erase it and redraw it, take new picture, repeat.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eagle Plumes
    replied
    Originally posted by superndngyrl View Post
    The computer is also great for making ribbonwork designs. :)
    Ok you have my Att lol

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  • superndngyrl
    replied
    The computer is also great for making ribbonwork designs. :)

    Leave a comment:


  • lostsalt
    replied
    Absolutely I use it. Especially in the planning /designing stages. I can qiuckly determine if the colors i chose have the desired effect. is the contrast enough, etc. I can see several colored backgrounds in no time and change detail of the elements themselves. l
    I've found it useful as well to make sure the spacing is right. The space between design elements can be determined exactly. You can move it around until you like it.
    These things used to take LOTS of time. I would usually end up short cutting it.
    The p.c. has made it easier to have a great blueprint for the project, where as before I would have most of it in my head.

    Lostsalt

    Leave a comment:

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