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  • material to bead on

    I just started beading recently, and I don't really know much. One of my friends showed me the basics, & now I'm just figuring it out as I go. So I have some questions.

    *I started beading a headband, and I'm half way done. But, the material I used is a very thin cotton material stretched out on one of those stitching hoops.
    -Will be beadwork look better if I use a different type of material? What would you suggest?
    -Since the material is thin, will it affect how long my beadwork lasts? (When I'm done, I'm going to sew it onto something thick like leather or felt for something.)

    *Does anyone have any tips to make my beadwork look nice and flat? I used the method of stringing on three beads, then going back through the last two. & sometimes some of the beads sort of pop up or stick out.

    Okay, well thank you in advance for your advice & tips. Any helpful tips would be awesome.

    -Shawna

  • #2
    Originally posted by shawna.butterfly View Post
    I just started beading recently, and I don't really know much. One of my friends showed me the basics, & now I'm just figuring it out as I go. So I have some questions.

    *I started beading a headband, and I'm half way done. But, the material I used is a very thin cotton material stretched out on one of those stitching hoops.
    -Will be beadwork look better if I use a different type of material? What would you suggest?
    -Since the material is thin, will it affect how long my beadwork lasts? (When I'm done, I'm going to sew it onto something thick like leather or felt for something.)

    *Does anyone have any tips to make my beadwork look nice and flat? I used the method of stringing on three beads, then going back through the last two. & sometimes some of the beads sort of pop up or stick out.

    Okay, well thank you in advance for your advice & tips. Any helpful tips would be awesome.

    -Shawna
    To get the beads to lay flat they have to be uniform so that means you have to sort them and get them all the same size

    May I suggest something
    If your beading a strip perhaps you should use a Loom!


    Crazy Crow has lots of starter looms
    Ojibway Bead Loom: Crazy Crow Trading Post
    ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
    Till I Die!

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    • #3
      Ummm... don't use a hoop. Use 2 needle applique.

      There's lots of threads on here regarding both your issues. Usually I don't mind repeating things, but it's late and I'm grouchy. jokes
      ...it is what it is...

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      • #4
        your material is going to effect how well your beadwork turns out. I suggest starting over because thin material just won't work. I imagine your asking because the more your beading the worse it is looking no matter what you do. You need thicker material, like canvas kind of thick. Also the 3 needle stitching is good, as well as good uniform beads as the others told you. Don't squeeze in that extra bead, to many & they will also pop & stuff, not to mention practice. Keep going, if it was an overnight skill everyone would do it

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        • #5
          Originally posted by wyo_rose View Post
          Ummm... don't use a hoop. Use 2 needle applique.

          There's lots of threads on here regarding both your issues. Usually I don't mind repeating things, but it's late and I'm grouchy. jokes
          Speaking of 2 needle applique, is there a thread about this already? i cant seem to find it, im very interestd in learning more about this way of beading..
          I got a fevah! And the only cure is more cowbell!!!

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          • #6
            You will do alot better if you have a sturdier beading surface ,cotton is waaay too flimsy.. I myself use the heavier pellon, nice and sturdy yet flexible, i really like it.
            I got a fevah! And the only cure is more cowbell!!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Eagle Plumes View Post
              Speaking of 2 needle applique, is there a thread about this already? i cant seem to find it, im very interestd in learning more about this way of beading..
              Here is a very simple link for it: NativeTech: Glass Beadwork ~ Applique Techniques with Glass Beads

              I do the single needle applique technique because it was the way I was taught
              LOL
              ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
              Till I Die!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Josiah View Post
                Here is a very simple link for it: NativeTech: Glass Beadwork ~ Applique Techniques with Glass Beads

                I do the single needle applique technique because it was the way I was taught
                LOL
                Thank-You Josiah.. I will have to try it..
                I got a fevah! And the only cure is more cowbell!!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  http://www.powwows.com/gathering/bea...ing-video.html

                  Here's a link showing some of our local beadwork. The featured beader is doing 2 needle applique. Some of the posts in there explain a little about two needle applique.

                  You can actually bead on thin cotton if you want. You just need to back it and top it to make it stiff enough. If you've beaded far enough that you don't want to tear it out, glue on some thick brown paper (think paper grocery sack) on the back with elmer's glue. You don't want a whole lot of glue, just an even layer.

                  Usually whatever I back my stuff with brown paper and top it with white paper (bond or a cotton blend is cool) with the design on it (or just a center line if I'm doing a geometric pattern. I don't like to glue, but some of the coolest things I've seen is canvas glued to white paper, then edged with bias. Simple and to the point.

                  If you're using some kind of fabric that frays you MUST attend to this before you get too far. The best thing to do is to edge it with bias. That's why the thick Pellon interfacing is good to bead on, cuz it doesn't fray. Of course, brain tanned buckskin that you can stick a needle through like butter it the BESTEST thing to bead on. Even with that I would back it and top it.
                  ...it is what it is...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As for 2 needle applique, it's a piece of cake. You'll generally have 1 threaded needle working on top of the piece and one working underneath. Cut a 36 inch piece of thread (I like A for most things), thread through a sharp needle and tie the ends together in a knot. Do the same for your other thread. I've seen folks that use a single thickness of thread, but I don't see the advantage.

                    First bring your top threaded needle up to the top from the back along the lines of a pattern, or along the center line in a geometric. Put a few beads on this thread. Hold the beads in place and get your second threaded needle ready.

                    when starting on outlines or the center line of a geometric, you'll want to tack the top thread holding the beads every TWO beads. So with your 2nd needle come up just to the side of the line between the 2nd and 3rd bead. Then go back down on the other side of the top thread between the 2nd and 3rd beads again. Then come up between the 4th and 5th beads (just slightly to the side again) and back down on the other side of the thread. PIck up some more beads with your top needle and continue.

                    Don't push your beads together too tightly. And please allow space for the tacking thread. When you get to the end of the row, go down with your top thread and come up at the start of your next line, or knot it and cut it off.

                    When you fill in spaces or on adjoining lines supported by a starting beaded line, you can just tack down every THREE beads.

                    I'll have to look for a video camera cuz this is a lot of typing!! And I'm not sure I can explain it without pics.
                    Last edited by wyo_rose; 10-20-2008, 11:36 PM.
                    ...it is what it is...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      http://www.kstrom.net/isk/art/art_bea2.html

                      here's a link with a pic showing 2 needle applique, also called double needle, tacking and I'm sure there's other terms for it. And yes, you can leave all your knots on the top if you want. Unless I'm making mocs, all my knots are underneath.

                      This is the way you'd make rosettes too. That's a good illustration of a rosette in progress too.

                      don't look any further down the page, or you might be offended by the Lazy S-word stitch. I've NEVER heard it called that before.
                      ...it is what it is...

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                      • #12
                        http://www.powwows.com/gathering/tut...roduction.html

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Eagle Plumes View Post
                          You will do alot better if you have a sturdier beading surface ,cotton is waaay too flimsy.. I myself use the heavier pellon, nice and sturdy yet flexible, i really like it.
                          I too like to use pellon, weather it be with beads or with sequins. Pellon works great, and you can get it at any fabric store, and its not expensive. Happy beading.
                          Walk softly, leave nothing but footprints....

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                          • #14
                            I use white felt material that I bought at Walmart
                            to make it sturdy I use office manila folders
                            With a glue stick I tack the felt to a folder and then cut out how much I need for a project

                            real easy
                            ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
                            Till I Die!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I like to bead with smoked deer hide whenever possible. Its really soft and very easy to bead with, I sew my design on top to keep it firm, works great and I don't have to worry about frayed edges. I don't like sewing on commercial hides though unless I absolutely have to. For very large surfaces, like dress tops, I bead on canvass.

                              Comment

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