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how much should I charge?

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  • Tibiki Kinew
    replied
    Yes the square stitch is as close as it gets to the wampum stitch that I have seen. The ladder is not and neither is the brick!
    The square stitch is about the only stitch that comes close and that alone is a blessing. The main thing when starting that is not mentioned is a blind bead. Take any bead, an oddball so to speak and make that your constant blind bead for this stitching process. The blind bead gets tied to the very end of your thread to stop the beads from falling off. When you start the pattern you can take the whole row ans string it on and then follow the beading advice from the square for the first three rows, then go back to the first rows and flip the pattern over to redo the first level with the thread so that the first row gets snug. When you reach the end of a thread and it is only a few inches long, hide the thread in previous rows and zig zag away from the area you are working on. There are absolutely ZERO KNOTS in this way. Once you get the first thread done, take the loose start from the thread where the blind bead is and remove the bead, thread the needle on it and feed and hide the thread within the beadwork.
    You can do this anywhere you are and you do not need much space.
    Oh when you get to the last row of your beaqding pattern, again flip it over and redo the stitch in the opposite direction to once again tighten the outside edge.
    Once you get comfortable in this you will work with this stitch entirely, in fact you can do covered beading on necklaces that way too! Grandmother Urse (bear) does one better, by taking up to 5 sizes of beads can do 3-dimesional beading and keep it stiff! SO flower blossoms and birds are easy for her! Yes completely round shapes without stuffing them!!! She uses size 10 to size 15 seed beads for shaping and bigger beads for cores!
    This stitch started on the east coast with the Migmaw and has been shared all over but again forgotten and partially used and retitled! The first rows are what make the stitch unique, going back to firm up the outside is what makes it special. If you do not do the outside in the opposite way you have looser beads on the first row!

    Leave a comment:


  • NSoto
    replied
    Originally posted by SuzzeQ4 View Post
    I think it's a good idea. Protects you so that your not spending money you may not have too.
    Thanks SuzzeQ4, I was thinking for now on I will charge for half up front, but wanted to get an opinion.

    Leave a comment:


  • SuzzeQ4
    replied
    Originally posted by NSoto View Post
    I would also love to see a video or something on how to learn this stitch! It sounds great!

    As far as pricing, do you think it is too much to ask for half the money upfront for beadwork requested? Reason being, I have been asked to do a couple peices for someone and went out and bought the color beads they wanted and got started, but did not hear back from the person. Since I do not want to waste time and energy on someone that is not appreciative, would it be bad to ask for half upfront to make sure the person comes and purchases the peice?
    I think it's a good idea. Protects you so that your not spending money you may not have too.

    Leave a comment:


  • NSoto
    replied
    I would also love to see a video or something on how to learn this stitch! It sounds great!

    As far as pricing, do you think it is too much to ask for half the money upfront for beadwork requested? Reason being, I have been asked to do a couple peices for someone and went out and bought the color beads they wanted and got started, but did not hear back from the person. Since I do not want to waste time and energy on someone that is not appreciative, would it be bad to ask for half upfront to make sure the person comes and purchases the peice?

    Leave a comment:


  • SuzzeQ4
    replied
    I've used that tubular stitch for earrings. soon as i saw the tutorial I was like "oh I know that" Is this the stitch your refering to Tibiki? It is very secure. Never thought of using it for belts, but it would work well.

    Leave a comment:


  • legalstraight
    replied
    Also referred to as ladder stitch.
    I figured when Tibiki mentioned multiple passes, from the one time I have seen a reproduction belt I thought it was a little more like regular looking.

    And Bead Man, I have heard it referred to as Comanche stitch (by Comanches no less) but then again, we call it peyote stitch cause to prevent arguments it would have to be called Kiowa-Apache-Quapaw-Osage-Comanche stitch.

    Leave a comment:


  • BeadMan
    replied
    If you are searching by "wampum stitch" I doubt if you will find anything as this is the first time I have heard it called such. Non-native beadworkers often call it "square stitch" or "off-loom beadwork" The latter term is rather poor. I have eroneously heard it called "Comanche Stitch" before but that guy was a complete idiot and teaches the dumbest things I have ever seen to a lot of people. Try this link:

    Standard Square Stitch Beading Tutorial

    Leave a comment:


  • legalstraight
    replied
    Tibiki,
    I ran into a fella over the summer from, I think, Madeline (sp?) Island (someone referred to it as the Canadian version of Oklahoma) that had some reproduction pieces, I did get a good look at one and couldn't figure out the stitch.

    As for a video, all you really have to do is get someone to tape you doing it, but explain what you are doing as you are doing it. I have a ribbonwork video that someone made and that's all it is.

    Leave a comment:


  • SuzzeQ4
    replied
    Tibiki I want to know now too! There are some things I like to loom, but this wampum stitch sounds amazing.
    And I agree with Beadman that good loomwork looks amazing, but ya cant cut out beads & replace them.
    Of course my husband would be dissapointed if I stopped using my loom cause the one he made me is amazing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tibiki Kinew
    replied
    No the peyote is not the same, remember that the beads line up, in this stitch it is even more precise and they get locked inot place. Take a look at the bag that I have in my album it is done with the Wampum stitch. I compared it with the brck stitch and ladder stitch, they are all different!
    As per doing a video, darn I wouldn't know where to start on that! Just sitting and showing would be sooooooooo easy! I wish that I could get some one to to that with me!

    Leave a comment:


  • sherryh1014
    replied
    Wampum stitch

    i have tried researching the internet for the Wampum stitch with no luck, i keep getting the peyote. I thought that i could get a jump start on learning this while you were putting together a lesson for us. Is this stitch anything like the peyote? Have you thought about doing a video like on you tube or expert village?

    Leave a comment:


  • marnie2
    replied
    Could you maybe show us an example?
    Thanks, Marnie

    Leave a comment:


  • Tibiki Kinew
    replied
    Sorry for these sacred belts being carried by an Elder of 95 years, he does not permit pictures! He carries 7 treaty belts from the Ontario/Quebec region. He lets you look at them and touch them and hold them, even sketch them but NO PICS! So we go by his wishes.
    I hope that it doesn't sound too overbearing about comparing loom work with the Stitch, but I for one am not the only one that was a traditional loomer, I gave up on the loom once a thread broke and spilt lots of beads and I had to repair it. Now for all the years of the Wampum stitch I have never ever had to fix a piece. This stitch which is so old has had its reason for surviving so long, treaties changed, things added and dropped, the belts needed to reflect that too, so without making a new one, some of these belts were altered and the section was cut out and replaced in the same way. Loomed belts last too, but once they get broken threads they do loose beads! With the Wampum stitch each and every bead gets to see thread 4 times, making it that much stronger and last just like the belts being carried by Grandfather!

    No disrespect intended but I have seen and done and changed my mind years ago! I have loom work that is over 50 years old and it shows even from a good maker that it tends to shift!
    Again no disrespect intended just facts seen by those doing this stitch!

    Leave a comment:


  • BeadMan
    replied
    Tibiki, Don't be so fast to judge everyone's loom beadwork based on the poor craftsmanship of others. I'll put my loom weaving up against any other form and I know many others who would do the same. What it comes down to in my book is the time it takes to do the work. I've done a full mens fancy dance set in a week on a loom. Loom beadwork is very strong if you just take the effort to do it right. I am a bit suspect of the historic examples you cite as being made in "wampum stitch." Do you have specific examples or photographes to enlighten us?

    Leave a comment:


  • Tibiki Kinew
    replied
    I guess I need to make a video! Darn! Doing this in person would be soooooo much easier!

    Leave a comment:

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