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Wrapping and Peyote Stitch

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  • Wrapping and Peyote Stitch

    Hey ya'll:

    I'm trying to get back into beading stuff again and wondered if I absolutley have to wrap a given item in leather before I proceed to bead it.

    I'm working on a backscratcher and have no leather. What's the worst that could happen if there is no leather backing? Should I use glue?

    Any advice will help.

    Thanks
    Because of our treaty status, the distinction of being 'Cherokee' is a status of citizenship, not a racial issue.

  • #2
    I beaded my husband's stethoscope and I didn't wrap it in buckskin before I beaded it. I did wrap it with some athletic tape to protect the rubber but I didn't use any glue or anything like that. Hope this helps!

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    • #3
      The leather backing serves two purposes-
      1. To help the beads stay in place if you are a little loose on your stitch (keeps 'em from slidin' down)
      2. To pad the piece and keep the beads from damaging whatever they are on, and prevents beads from getting broken from bumps.

      That being said, no you don't have to back it with leather. I have used medical tape, pet wrap (the stuff you wrap on horses' legs works good) and one time weather stripping tape. Or you can go with no backing at all, but depending on the stitch and how you start your work it makes it more difficult since you don't have anything to stitch it down to.

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      • #4
        wrap it first, the beading will last longer and look better over time.

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        • #5
          Yeah, wrap your scratcher with something before beading. Having your beadwork slide around and get bunched up is annoying. Doesn't feel nice. Better to have a backing to give it some stability and cushioning.

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          • #6
            peyote stich

            you can use duct tape AYE !! i know ur laughing but serious take the duct tape and put the sticky side up so your beads stick to it and they will stay still if the work is tight enough you wont be able to see the duct tape
            and your Champeen of The 2009 pow wow IS!!!!!

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            • #7
              I've always used masking tape. It's cheap and you can control the thickness of the backing by how many times you wrap it around your item. Beads will "nest" well in it too. I have a few peyote stitched items in my photo gallery and all of them are backed with masking tape.

              yuchgeha Gallery - Pow Wow Photo Gallery - PowWows.com

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              • #8
                Sometimes leather or buckskin is just too thick for the item you're beading. I've wrapped a thick blue paper towel around a circular keychain I was beading....tucked in the ends and I think I taped it in place.
                ...it is what it is...

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                • #9
                  hmm...WHEN I start learning to peyote stitch..the lady who is going to teach me ..uses nothing but masking tape on all her projects. SO..I think I"m gonna go with that, but I'm still gonna take into account all the ideas I've read here. My first project is my Dad's new gourd. He doesnt' know about it yet....

                  Good luck!
                  "I tried being normal once, worse 2 mins of my life!"

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                  • #10
                    I'll give it a shot....

                    The part that I intend to bead is considerably thinner than the rest of the stick, so the tape makes sense.

                    I'll give it a go and update.

                    Thanks, ya'll!
                    Because of our treaty status, the distinction of being 'Cherokee' is a status of citizenship, not a racial issue.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [QUOTE=

                      Thanks, ya'll![/QUOTE]

                      Attaboy,
                      Obviously a graduate of the tribal school if he can properly spell ya'll.

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                      • #12
                        Heh heh

                        Originally posted by legalstraight View Post
                        Attaboy,
                        Obviously a graduate of the tribal school if he can properly spell ya'll.
                        Well, I don't know about that, but I was raised next to the deep-fry at my step daddys catfish house.

                        That's gotta count for somethin'!

                        Ayyyyyy....
                        Because of our treaty status, the distinction of being 'Cherokee' is a status of citizenship, not a racial issue.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I use soft leather on everything because it helps to cushion (as has been mentioned before) but it also helps even out an item. Sometimes the things I bead are round and sometimes they are sorta round. Heck sometimes they have sides. The leather evens it out a bit in a way that tape and such can't (great for hand carved dance sticks or fan handles or even Christmas ornaments for example). I use scrap and I use the leather you can buy at Wally World that you might use to wash your car with. Super thin and stretchy and you can cut it to fit anything. One shammy has held out through numerous projects over the last 15 years or so. Just use a little rubber cement (no need to soak it) to attach it to whatever and you are good to go. Trim it if you need to in order to make sure you don't have a bump in your beadwork at the seam. At most it takes you a minute to set up your project and you are beading.

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                          • #14
                            Ive wrapped small items wound with thread on area to be worked to help it not to slide off. Works preety good, and use a smidge of beeswax around wrapped thread

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