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Starting a new men's northern set

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  • Starting a new men's northern set

    Hello, I am starting a men's northern set and I had a few beadwork questions regarding what to bead on, and the best way to construct certain things where it looks clean, professional, and will last a few years. I am not new to beading, but I only know how to bead on leather and deer sinew, which isn't an option for my dance clothes. I really only know to use waxed nymo beading thread and not to use imitation sinew since it stretches over time, and cuts through leather. (especially while sewing latigo soles on moccasins.

    I have heard good things about pellon, duck cloth, and stiff felt, but I am not sure which one to use to make a certain piece of clothing. I see duck cloth (beaded, then edged with bias tape) is popular for vests, leggings, cuffs, and side drops, but I am concerned about this material because the material can fray. Why is canvas/duck cloth the most popular over the other options? I have experimented with canvas that I cut out and edge in bias before beading so the bias tape will be covered and it will look like buckskin, but rows of 1/2in in 11/0 czech don't always match up and the back of the beadwork ends up looking squished, and the pattern shrinks because of it. Along with the armbands I have kneebands, and a vest cut out and already edged, but every bone in my body is telling me not to bead on them because I done something wrong with the lumpy, bumpy armbands. I don't want to spend a few months on a vest and have the vest shrink so much it begins to look like a female's jingle dress vest. That's why I am concerned and want to know options for material I can bead on and cut out once I'm done without worrying about it bunching up or fraying.

    Is pellon or stiff felt a viable option for cuffs, kneebands, side drops, belt, roach spreader, moccasins(I know leather is preferred for this but I was also looking for alternatives) and a fully-beaded vest?(could I bead over a vest from the thrift store?) Which material do I use for which one? How do I construct them to last?

    I know it's packed-full of questions that have been answered and discussed before, but none of them quite answer the specifics I am worried about. If there is a way to use duck cloth in a way I feel comfortable with, I'd be open to learning that construction method too so I don't have to let my extras go to waste.
    Last edited by littleswan; 09-09-2012, 07:42 PM.

  • #2
    I always wash my fabric before sewing/cutting. That way it's not going to shrink again.

    I also use sizing spray on my cloth fabrics when I'm beading them, helps to keep them from pulling out of shape. If the fabric is lightweight, I use an iron on backing like wonder under.

    To stop fraying, use a tape or spray that prevents the fraying. I also run a seam along the edge of fabirc that I know will fray badly.. it hepls stops the edge from fraying. On clothing that is made from fabirc that frays easily, I also either use the serger or run a zig-zag seam along the edges to stop the fraying.

    When designing your patterns, use a bead measurement chart (tells you how many beads are in any particular row, length, per inch). That way you'll be able to rework your design if the rows aren't matching up.

    There are many brand name beads out on the market, some are better then others with respect to consistent sizing amongst the beads. Try and use brands that try to have their beads consistent in sizing, it'll be less frustrating when you are having to be exact with your rows/patterns.


    Good luck!
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. — Robert A. Heinlein

    I can see the wheel turning but the Hamster appears to be dead.

    Comment


    • #3
      What she said!

      And in my opinion:

      The best thing to bead on: braintanned buckskin

      Next best: Canvas that has been edged with bias - YES, but if it's not a super heavy weight canvas, it needs a stabilizer. Put canvas and Pellon (the thickest one) together either with WonderUnder or just baste it together.

      I assume you're doing lane or lazy stitch, since you got squishy, lumpy, bumpy results. That's gonna happen, unless you stabilize, stabilize, stabilize.

      My suggestion: find the heaviest weight Pellon, cut a backing out of this for all your pieces. Zigzag them together along the edge. Edge them with bias, but only sew the bias on the front and leave the edge that will be on the back side hanging loose. Bead, bead, bead...right up onto the bias. Then put a nice PRESHRUNK cotton backing on to hide the beading thread, then fold the bias over, stitch it down to cover the edge of all three layers.

      If you bead it applique style, it will never shrink, pucker, etc...if you stabilize it enough, too.

      Good luck. And again, this is my opinion. I don't know everything, even though I've been called a know-it-all.
      ...it is what it is...

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the replies you guys they help out quite a bit. :)

        wyo_rose, how do you make sure the rows will line up correctly if the piece I will be beading is already pre-cut? with 11/0 beads, a row of 1/2in is about 9.5 beads according to the bead chart. I tried pre-cutting and biasing my armbands before beading and I ended up with 3 good rows and 1 super big row because the rows didnt match up with the edging. :/ That last big row more of the bias tape on the top to show than the bias on the bottom so it looked lopsided.

        Is there a way around that so I can measure out rows to fit properly, or should I just bias it after I finish beading and superglue those rhinestones to the side to hide some of the ugly bias tape?
        Last edited by littleswan; 09-14-2012, 05:21 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Depending on the beads - all size 11's are NOT created equal - I would just pick a nice odd number if you're doing a design....probably 9....or maybe even just 8 if your doing background. Ten seems like a little too many to me for a single row.

          Keep all your rows the same, even if you have a little extra space. Then you can just use small rows to finish up...4..then 2..then 1 even. An extra long row would look a little strange.

          When beading, some people mark out every lane. I usually just make one reference line and start beading there. On the next rows out, if you're getting off too much, just use skinnier or fatter beads to make up for it, so you can end up with a pretty straight edge.

          Some Plains peoples bunch up their beads, for "poofy" lanes, but I prefer them laying flatter.

          If you want a more "perfect" looking beadwork...use 2 needle applique. It's my personal fav.

          Oh, and DON'T use 3 cuts for lazy stitch!!! I'm in the middle of making mocs like this and I swear I will NEVER do it again. Talk about beads not being made of equal sizes!!!
          ...it is what it is...

          Comment


          • #6
            Sometime if I'm beading on a shaped piece (iow, not a square) I use scotch tape to mark our my lanes. Then I just bead over it. The tape is the perfect size for lazy stitch.
            A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. — Robert A. Heinlein

            I can see the wheel turning but the Hamster appears to be dead.

            Comment

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