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  • need help... any ideas?

    Ok fellow beaders...

    Here's my dilemma... I started beading these ponies... been coming along GREAT! I beaded them on lap pads (as I usually do for barrettes and stuff... anyway... the plan is to applique them to a cap. Well, I didn't think it all the way through (go me!) and last night I'm sitting there thinking... holy crap! When I finish them, I'll cut them and sew them to the cap but what do I do about the edge? AND... what if I cut too close to the edge of the beadwork and snip a thread (horror!). So, any ideas ladies and gents?? I don't want to glue the horses to the hat (in the event that one day the hat needs retiring and the ponies don't). Any solutions??
    Haudenosaunee Hotties & Hunnies

  • #2
    I'm not SURE I understand the exact application, but here goes with my idea...

    Cut out your beadwork from the pad, and stitch it down on your cap, kinda like you were sewing on a patch over a hole in a pair of jeans... Leave at least 1/4 to 3/8 around the last row of beadwork, and if you are REALLY worried about unraveling, iron some of that "glue tape" stuff (stitchless basting?) all around your fabric edge for security. Make sure you tuck the edge of the "un beaded" fabric under the beadwork as you go stitching to your cap.

    In order to hide the edge stitching, do a beaded border... Like it you would on a rosette if you've ever done that before, or between the backing and the front of a barette (you said you made those before right?).

    In the future if there is ever a problem, just cut the stitching from the cap to the "beaded patch" and you're all set. Just repeat the process to attach to another project!

    Is that the kind of idea you were looking for? Definately don't get those scissors too close to your beading threads, or cut so the edges will unravel... That would be a tragedy!

    hth, Tom

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    • #3
      good tip but I think that the lap pad might be too thick to turn under. It's that rubber stuff with flannel... know what stuff I'm talking about?
      Haudenosaunee Hotties & Hunnies

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      • #4
        I would cut it out leave some room to do some ravel beadwork where you go through around and again but make sure when you go through you put like maybe 5 -8 beads whichever fits the edging and go around otherwise thats about it. Unitl i remember or next time im online lol Just like up dere what he says lol
        Last edited by cree_raven_redsky; 05-11-2004, 05:50 PM. Reason: forgot a few lines lol


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        • #5
          I'd do what hockeyfan said except for turning the edges under... instead I would cut the edge just slightly smaller than a row of beads would be, and then use that edge to do a running stitch bead edge around the entire pony preferably in the color of the hat.
          Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

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          • #6
            Sorry, I didn't realize it was that rubber stuff... I thought "lap pad" was that stuff like a baby receiving blanket, kinda cottony and thick... I was always afraid that the bead stitching would pull through that rubbery stuff, although it does look nice to work on.

            Tom

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            • #7
              My thread would break before it tore through the lap pad stuff. It's really strong! Yeah it's kinda thick but not too thick, just a bit too thick to turn under.
              Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Blackbear
                I'd do what hockeyfan said except for turning the edges under... instead I would cut the edge just slightly smaller than a row of beads would be, and then use that edge to do a running stitch bead edge around the entire pony preferably in the color of the hat.
                I had this exact same idea! Just *ding* :Idea came to me yesterday... great minds sis... :Thumbs Thanks for all the great ideas troops... you rock!!! I'll be sure to take a pic when I'm done and show you all how it came out!! :D Maybe I'll even get a pic of it on the lucky recipient:2: (shhh:Quiet ... it's a suprise). Just something to laugh about... here's how "in shape" I am... my forearm is sore from beading....:muscles:... *lol* I think from holding the needle so tight and having to pull it through that darn lap pad... but what else is there to bead on that is strong, water proof, won't stretch, and is pretty stable??
                Haudenosaunee Hotties & Hunnies

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                • #9
                  In case you haven't already done that, here's another idea. Get a piece of canvas, and glue the beadwork onto the canvas. I use this glue called Industrial Strength E6000. The Multi-purpose Adhesive, Self-Leveling Formula, Medium Viscosity. It comes in like, a metal tube. But glue the beadwork onto the canvas with that, leave it to dry overnight. Then cut out your beadwork and sew it onto the cap. The threads don't come out of the sides and the beads don't fall off.

                  Kim
                  TARHEEL BORN, TARHEEL BRED, WHEN I DIE I'LL BE TARHEEL DEAD!

                  MizzQaqimat's Space

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                  • #10
                    I would never use glue on the back of beadwork; just sew it on neatly and bead around the edges.

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                    • #11
                      I see what CNG is saying.. you are saying add on another layer and the glue seeps into the threads holding them fast. E6000 is a clear drying cement that also dries flexible. All she's suggesting is reinforcement.
                      Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by gaonseh
                        but what else is there to bead on that is strong, water proof, won't stretch, and is pretty stable??
                        How about that "EZ felt" everybody was discussing the other day on another thread? It's only $0.79 for a piece about 11x17 (or larger?) at Michaels. Nice stiffness, decent weight, and it SEEMS strong...

                        Personally I have only beaded on canvas... I was just always afraid to try anything else, but if the felt stuff is strong enough, it'd be awesome to bead on, and I'd expect the needle to GLIDE right through...

                        Any comments on the stuff?
                        Tom

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                        • #13
                          I would trim the edge of your lap pad just close enough so that you don't cut the threads of your beadwork and use a little tacky glue to adhere it to the cap then do another beaded row or rows around the pony so that you cover up the lap pad and the stitches of beadwork hold it the hat.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Blackbear
                            I see what CNG is saying.. you are saying add on another layer and the glue seeps into the threads holding them fast. E6000 is a clear drying cement that also dries flexible. All she's suggesting is reinforcement.
                            Exactaticaticaticaly. lol ;)
                            TARHEEL BORN, TARHEEL BRED, WHEN I DIE I'LL BE TARHEEL DEAD!

                            MizzQaqimat's Space

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bdn_ndn_grl
                              I would trim the edge of your lap pad just close enough so that you don't cut the threads of your beadwork and use a little tacky glue to adhere it to the cap then do another beaded row or rows around the pony so that you cover up the lap pad and the stitches of beadwork hold it the hat.
                              Yeah, trim the edge very close since lap pad doesn't unravel much. BUT then use fray check, some clear cement or other glue and go around the edge of the thing and let it dry. This will stop any possible raveling. Then stitch it to the hat and do a little beading on the edge.

                              If they're bigger designs you might want to glue or cement them to the back of canvas. But canvas unravels TERRIBLY, so cut your canvas to fit and edge it with bias tape, then glue to the beadwork.

                              Just my 2 1/2 cents!
                              ...it is what it is...

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