Sumo

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I need help (on making a fancy regalia).

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I need help (on making a fancy regalia).

    Hello, I am a fancy shawl dancer; I just started in the beginning of October. I would like to to know how to make a fancy shawl regalia; I have no resources at all and I need some guidance from. What type of fabrics do I need? What type of shawl fringes should I get from Crazy Crow? I want applique - do I just get the fabric, cut it and put it on the ragalia? What items should I buy in order to make a fancy shawl regalia? Please HELP this lost person. Thank you.

    ~ Tiffany (Stands Tall Woman)

    P.S. Please do not knock me down, for I do not know the answer to the question. Please have patience with me, for I have the tendency to ask a lot of question - for getting on people's nerve by asking so many questions. I was taught to ask questions and do not be afraid to ask questions. I want to make a regalia and be proud that I am made it all by myself.
    Last edited by StandsTallWoman; 03-23-2005, 08:15 PM.
    ~ Tiffany ~

  • #2
    well that's a tall order since I've only made one set myself for my kid and I could have done her yoke better..... You know the first place to start is looking at pictures to figure out what you want it to look like as far as the make goes.. I dont' mean copying someone's clothes, but there are kinds that are dresses with a full yoke, some that are a skirt and vest with the yoke attached to the vest... and then figure out your design and colors you would like.
    Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

    Comment


    • #3
      I second BlackBear on the looking at pics. Since you'll be going to powwows, go and watch the dancers. See how the regalia is put together. Make a friend who can give you guidance. There is nothing like getting someone to tell you how they did it.

      Get a clear idea of the what you want to do. Make some sketches. Lay out colors. Do a couple of practice bits.

      You have an advantage with shawl dance clothes, in that properly selected conventional dress and vest patterns can be used as is or adapted for use. Fabric applique can be learned at your local fabric store, Joanne Fabrics and others have classes and workshops. Your local libarary may well have books on how to do the basic techniques.

      As far as fabric, remember your going to be sweating in your clothes. Pick stuff that breaths, is durable, and can be cleaned. Wrinkle resistant is a plus, especially if you favor rural powwows -- it's pretty hard to plug in an iron in a tent, LOL. Since you're going to do your yoke and leggings in fabric or sequins, you'll need to layer heavy fabrics with interfacing. You want to get some weight to have it hang right, otherwise you may be flogged to death by your yoke during a fast song :)

      For the shawl, you need fabric heavy enough (but not too heavy) to take shoving a really big needle through a couple layers without ripping or breaking your fingers. Wrinkle resistant is a must or it will be perma-wrinkled where you hold it. ( My mom always made me squeeze a handful of the fabric I liked, if it wrinkled she'd refuse to make me clothes from it, LOL. )

      Shawls can be doubled over and fringed on all sides, or not doubled and fringed on three sides. This will effect the amount of fringe needed. There are two common types of fringe: chainette and flat fringe. Chainette is round and is sold in spools or already cut and sewn together. Flat fringe, which is like a thin ribbon, is sold on spools. The choice depends on your taste. The stuff on the spool is measured out and cut; the pre-cut fringe is picked off the presewn threads and used.

      If you're using the stuff on the spool, it is helpful to have a jig to measure. I have a couple for different lengths, made by putting two wooden dowels at opposite ends of peices of 1x2's. You can improvise one by turning two kitchen chairs over and putting them on a table, and winding your fringe between the legs.

      I know you want to make your own dance clothes but, if you've never made moccs, you may want to get someone to make them for you. You're going to be dancing a style that puts lots of stress on your footwear, they need to be sturdy. Blown out side seams aren't pretty. Well made moccs are worth the price. There are lots of people who can do that.

      Comment


      • #4
        THANKS GUYS!!!!! I deeply appreciate it. I am going do a few sketches during the Easter break and post it up to you guys. Yes, I will be definitely sweating after all that spinning, skipping and hopping lolz. Would a cotton material be okay? I do not want my fancy shawl regalia to be shiny or beaded up. I never made moccasins nor own a pair before; I was supposed to go to the workshop, but I think I missed it. I have two choices: either buy it online or go to the Shinnecock rez and buy it; I will think it over. Again, thank you for your help.
        ~ Tiffany ~

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by StandsTallWoman
          I do not want my fancy shawl regalia to be shiny or beaded up.
          No offense, but you're sort of missing the point here.
          I think everyone on this rez is addicted to Harry Potter...lol...

          Comment


          • #6
            cotton wrinkles easily... try rayon. I used rayon for my kids' skirt and vest with blue microdot... it's easy to care for and doe'snt wrinkle easily unless it gets wet and it breathes good and hangs good too.
            Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Warning, personal opinion of a woman who only irons feathers: 100% cotton fabric usually wrinkles like the dickens. I think you're in trade off territory here, the breathablity of cotton vs wrinkle resistance of a blend. Now, if you're not going to travel much or far, wrinkle resistance is less of an issue. Or if you love your iron cotton is great.

              As for the beadwork, I got to agree with SingerDad. You're missing a great opportunity. The Sihasapa have a wonderful beadwork and design tradtion. Truely a wonderful legacy. Nothing like your own regalia to give you an excuse to immerse yourself (and to honor the artistic and craftsmanship legacies of your ancestors). But then I'm the kind who makes beaded goblets, so if it aint moving, its going to get covered, LOL.

              How are you going to make your hair ties and/or barrettes, without beadwork? I'm interested in seeing what you have in mind.

              As for the mocs, Sioux Trading Post, Matoska, Steve Eagles, and lots of other outfits can link you up with moccasins made in the style of at least one of your people.

              Anyway, hope I answered the question somewhere in there,

              Comment


              • #8
                LOL BlackBear, you read my mind while I was crashing my browser.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Baby Cloth works great for leggings, stiff but not to stiff, easy to bead on and they keep the moisture away from u. All 3 of my girls are fancy shawl, we used satin, sateen or rayon fabrics for their dresses/vests. The more flash the better they like it, lol.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sldodson
                    Baby Cloth works great for leggings, stiff but not to stiff, easy to bead on and they keep the moisture away from u. All 3 of my girls are fancy shawl, we used satin, sateen or rayon fabrics for their dresses/vests. The more flash the better they like it, lol.
                    I was thinking of rayon fabrics. I agree with you all, I need a fabric that is wrinkle resistant; I do not want my regalia to be wrinkle so easily. Rayon fabrics will be on my shopping list.
                    ~ Tiffany ~

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by OLChemist
                      As for the beadwork, I got to agree with SingerDad. You're missing a great opportunity. The Sihasapa have a wonderful beadwork and design tradtion. Truely a wonderful legacy. Nothing like your own regalia to give you an excuse to immerse yourself (and to honor the artistic and craftsmanship legacies of your ancestors). But then I'm the kind who makes beaded goblets, so if it aint moving, its going to get covered, LOL.

                      How are you going to make your hair ties and/or barrettes, without beadwork? I'm interested in seeing what you have in mind.

                      As for the mocs, Sioux Trading Post, Matoska, Steve Eagles, and lots of other outfits can link you up with moccasins made in the style of at least one of your people.

                      Guys, do not get me wrong...I am definitely going to get a beaded moccasins and hair tie/or barettes. I will also definitely going to honor my ancestors. May I have the websites to Sioux Trading Post, Steve Eagles and Motoska? Thank you so much for all of your help.

                      ~ Tiffany (Stands Tall Woman) ~
                      ~ Tiffany ~

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Satin

                        We finished a fancy shawl outfit for a friend last month. We chose to use a crepe backed satin. It has a beautiful sheen and is machine washable. We made her shirt and skirt out of this material. It is easily available at most fabric stores, even chains like Hancock or Joann's or Michael's. We even found some on sale one weekend at Hobby Lobby. (These may just be local chains, so YMMV). It doesn't wrinkle easily and breathes well. We also were able to cut pieces of it to use for applique, however, it frays very easily. We just cut the pieces we needed for the designs on the shawl using a woodburning tool. It seals the edgles so you don't have any fraying. Then we applique stitched them on. Hope this helps.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by beadmom
                          We just cut the pieces we needed for the designs on the shawl using a woodburning tool. It seals the edgles so you don't have any fraying. Then we applique stitched them on. Hope this helps.
                          What a great tip....... I had forgotten about this so I'm glad you brought it up. It does really well!
                          "We see it as a desecration not only of a mountain but of our way of life. This is a genocidal issue to us. If they kill this mountain, they kill our way of life." ~Debra White Plume

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Applique

                            I do have one question for more experienced shawl makers that applique designs to their shawls. We used Heat-n-Bond lite to iron on the design to the shawl before we zigzag stitched it onto the shawl material, however, it makes the shawl heavier and stiff where the design is. Someone told us to use a basting spray glue instead. We tried it, but I liked the heat-n-bond better because when we cut out the design, it was easier to have the bonding glue and the paper on the back. But, we still want to make the design not so heavy. How do you attach your designs to the shawl?

                            Also, I have seen some very detailed designs with small curved areas curling out from the design. I would think it would be difficult to zigzag these little points down. Do you just straight stitch around these types of designs?

                            Thanks for any suggestions you may have. My mother and I will start working on a fancy outfit for my niece next week.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ok have you ever watched those sewing shows on PBS? They have an idea that might work for you.. what they do is get waxed paper and iron that lightly to the material that they want to applique. they put a piece of paper on the side of the wax paper that they are ironing so it does'nt get on the iron, then you can draw your design piece on that and cut it out.. with a light iron you can then iron that piece onto your shawl. Now it's not steadfast and it does'nt seal the edges like heat and bond or wonder under do, but it will hold it temporarily in place so that you can zig zag it, without making it stiff. BTW.. have you tried wonder under? It's made by Pellon and you can buy it at walmart or joannes or just about anywhere that sells fabric.. it's a bit lighter than heat and bond but holds just as well.

                              for those curled and curved designs.. you go very slow and move your design carefully under the needle. You can even do it manually... let me try to explain... when you come to a curve or point, stop your machine with the needle through the fabric. Then raise the foot and move your design in place for the next stitch, lower the foot and by hand turn your sewing machine's wheel to make the stitch and repeat that till you are around a curve. If you come to a point, then stop the machine with the needle down, raise the foot, turn your material around , lower the foot and continue on. Now the trick here is where to stop. I use the guide line on a clear foot to go by. Your needle will go on either side of that center line and you need to watch and know how far it goes.. when you come to a point you actually want to go past the point a stitch or two so that when you turn your fabric to back down the point it's lined up right. When I started doing applique I was'nt happy doing regular geometric patterns and threw myself full into the curves, curls and points. I'm to a point now that I can have a shawl strip done in two hour and the stitching part only takes me 15-20 minutes. I know that sounds too fast but I've learned how to grab my fabric and manipulate it while the needle is moving and I rarely have a mess up. But I had to start the same way I just explained above... and I sure hope I made sense LOL
                              Last edited by Blackbear; 04-06-2005, 04:07 AM.
                              Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

                              Comment

                              Join the online community forum celebrating Native American Culture, Pow Wows, tribes, music, art, and history.

                              Related Topics

                              Collapse

                              • New2itall
                                Sewing a simple shawl
                                by New2itall
                                Being out here in non-Pow Wow land, I have managed to make it into adulthood without having attended a Pow Wow. Recently I went to OK and was able to attend a Pow Wow while there (Choctaw). I was told I need to at least get a shawl for entering the circle during open dances. We are going back in a few...
                                05-02-2008, 02:58 PM
                              • CHEROKEE-N-PROUD
                                help me please
                                by CHEROKEE-N-PROUD
                                I am just begining to start the process of fancy dancing.I am 14 years old and I love fancy shawl dancing. I am creating my shawl designs , but I don't know where to start.
                                I also love the dance but don't know where to start there either . I have been to numerous pow-wows and watched so many...
                                01-17-2007, 05:03 PM
                              • redberries
                                How to make a bib....??!
                                by redberries
                                Hello there,

                                Okay here is the deal...I have jingle dance for years and that regalia holds no secret for me. However, my niece wants to Fancy Shawl and has asked me to design her regalia. I have done the skirt, I am half way through with the waistcoat part. I have tried to find old threads...
                                07-21-2007, 03:50 AM
                              • appleprincess
                                Outfit pattern
                                by appleprincess
                                I am back for those of you who used to tease me when I used "Ahpi Shikopa". No, my name hasn't changed, but I decided that if you were going to tease me with "Autumn Apple Princess," I might as well use the name. No hard feelings to anyone anymore.

                                Anyway, for those...
                                04-01-2003, 12:29 PM
                              • MoonLightWarrior
                                Materials Needed for Fancy Shawl!
                                by MoonLightWarrior
                                Hey everyone, I'm new to this. I should be getting my bead order to start the beadwork for my fancy shawl regalia soon so I want to finish the shawl before then! However, I'm LOST lol. I just don't know where to start. I want a double sided shawl (white and royal blue satin-y fabric?) and it will have...
                                05-24-2012, 08:44 PM

                              Trending

                              Collapse

                              There are no results that meet this criteria.

                              Sidebar Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X