Sumo

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

a question about feathers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • a question about feathers

    I collect feathers on my walks. No eagles, hawks or even turkeys for that matter. Usually I find duck feathers,some feathers from songbirds. A heron feather if I'm lucky. I was thinking of making a fan with the duck feathers. They are small but very beautiful.
    I usually wash them and let them sit for a few days before handling them much. So my question,is there any reason not to use them?



    annie

  • #2
    Originally posted by annie_griffin View Post
    I collect feathers on my walks. No eagles, hawks or even turkeys for that matter. Usually I find duck feathers,some feathers from songbirds. A heron feather if I'm lucky. I was thinking of making a fan with the duck feathers. They are small but very beautiful.
    I usually wash them and let them sit for a few days before handling them much. So my question,is there any reason not to use them?



    annie
    No,
    Having said that just confirm they are not protected by the various laws...
    Migratory Bird Laws for one
    Protected species acts
    Endangered species acts
    ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
    Till I Die!

    Comment


    • #3
      thanks

      Josiah,
      Thanks. I will check the laws but I have to say it seems odd that
      anyone should care if a person picks up feathers off the ground.




      -annie

      Comment


      • #4
        chances are the duck feathers you found are not from an endangered species...if they were, I challenge ANY game warden to ID them by sight!!! lol....my old ornithology professors probably couldn't do that!

        most ducks and geese are included in the Migratory Bird Act...here's a summary of that law: Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918

        taken literally, nearly every bird migrates and thus would be included and protected by this law...someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe there are a FEW species specific exclusions (written in subsequent amendments to the MBA) like starlings and house sparrows (considered to be introduced/non-native "pest" species)

        now, generally speaking, these laws that protect our N.American birds are written to give lawmakers the power to prosecute offenders

        now let's define offenders........in my opinion "offenders" do not include someone picking up "found" feathers

        offenders that warrant prosecution include:
        • poachers (someone who shoots eagles, hawks, condors, etc.)
        • black market traders (pets, illegal imports, exotic foods, etc)
        • anyone who engages in intentional destruction of known protected habitats (farmers, rancers, commercial real estate developers, etc)


        these are the issues and people that the lawmakers WILL spend their time pursuing for prosecution and will need those laws to do so

        law makers and game wardens really aren't too concerned with everyday citizens admiring or collecting found feathers.............until those private citizens begin harming birds and their habitats or try to benefit monetarily from those bird parts (selling found feathers of protected birds is a no-no)

        so enjoy and treasure your found feathers and rest assured that no one is going to knock on your door and try to confiscate your feathers and fine you or haul you off to jail (remember if anyone claims to be a game warden, the burden of proof is on them)

        Is anyone going to "look down on you" for using duck feathers? NO WAY...don't fall for that powwow snobbery!! LOL

        Remember, would someone 300 years ago have equally treasured those found duck feathers??? I should hope so!! ;)

        enjoy!
        sigpic


        See my trading post ads
        See my photo gallery
        See walela49's myspace page

        Comment


        • #5
          I should have gone to law school

          Josiah,
          Wow. I should have gone to law school instead of art school.
          I did learn that you shouldn't hunt crows on Sundays in
          New Jersey. Seeing as I am not a hunter and would never hunt
          a crow I guess that tidbit wasn't helpful. For some reason the red winged blackbird is considered an agricultural nuisance.
          I see those beautiful birds down by the creek and they don't seem
          to be annoying any agriculture. In New Jersey I'd have to say
          that highways and housing developments would be more of an agricultural nuisance. Maybe they are on the migratory bird list too.

          -annie

          Comment


          • #6
            hangin around the pond

            Walela,
            Thank you for your clear insight and encouragement.
            Well really I figure if I am honest with myself I probably have a lot
            more in common with the ducks anyway.

            Rather domesticated hanging around the pond.



            -annie

            Comment


            • #7
              My motto is never assume and always check
              But from what I am reading you will be safe using them for your own purposes!

              I am always surprised by what is in the law books
              So when I give advice I always say check the laws first!
              ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
              Till I Die!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by walela49 View Post
                chances are the duck feathers you found are not from an endangered species...if they were, I challenge ANY game warden to ID them by sight!!! lol....my old ornithology professors probably couldn't do that!

                most ducks and geese are included in the Migratory Bird Act...here's a summary of that law: Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918

                taken literally, nearly every bird migrates and thus would be included and protected by this law...someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe there are a FEW species specific exclusions (written in subsequent amendments to the MBA) like starlings and house sparrows (considered to be introduced/non-native "pest" species)

                now, generally speaking, these laws that protect our N.American birds are written to give lawmakers the power to prosecute offenders

                now let's define offenders........in my opinion "offenders" do not include someone picking up "found" feathers

                offenders that warrant prosecution include:
                • poachers (someone who shoots eagles, hawks, condors, etc.)
                • black market traders (pets, illegal imports, exotic foods, etc)
                • anyone who engages in intentional destruction of known protected habitats (farmers, rancers, commercial real estate developers, etc)


                these are the issues and people that the lawmakers WILL spend their time pursuing for prosecution and will need those laws to do so

                law makers and game wardens really aren't too concerned with everyday citizens admiring or collecting found feathers.............until those private citizens begin harming birds and their habitats or try to benefit monetarily from those bird parts (selling found feathers of protected birds is a no-no)

                so enjoy and treasure your found feathers and rest assured that no one is going to knock on your door and try to confiscate your feathers and fine you or haul you off to jail (remember if anyone claims to be a game warden, the burden of proof is on them)

                Is anyone going to "look down on you" for using duck feathers? NO WAY...don't fall for that powwow snobbery!! LOL

                Remember, would someone 300 years ago have equally treasured those found duck feathers??? I should hope so!! ;)

                enjoy!
                Good post
                ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ - Anigiduwagi
                Till I Die!

                Comment


                • #9
                  thanks!
                  I totally had on my "teacher hat" LOL
                  sigpic


                  See my trading post ads
                  See my photo gallery
                  See walela49's myspace page

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    weird luck

                    Josiah,
                    Thanks again. You were absolutely right to suggest about checking the laws.

                    So I was all excited to get started on this fan only to find that
                    a chipmunk ate (mauled) the feathers. How do I know this
                    well the poor thing was lying dead on the floor of my shed where
                    the feathers were drying.

                    I try not to be superstitious but I don't like this at all.
                    Not to mention I am disappointed about the feathers.

                    -annie

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      offenders that warrant prosecution include:
                      poachers (someone who shoots eagles, hawks, condors, etc.)
                      black market traders (pets, illegal imports, exotic foods, etc)
                      anyone who engages in intentional destruction of known protected habitats (farmers, rancers, commercial real estate developers, etc)

                      these are the issues and people that the lawmakers WILL spend their time pursuing for prosecution and will need those laws to do so

                      law makers and game wardens really aren't too concerned with everyday citizens admiring or collecting found feathers.............until those private citizens begin harming birds and their habitats or try to benefit monetarily from those bird parts (selling found feathers of protected birds is a no-no)
                      Actually they will and have done so. I have personally witnessed this. The feathers were those that were picked up from the ground....some song bird feathers that were molted and some a cat had killed. You do NOT take chances where you are not sure about feathers. Just leave them alone or never show them to anyone if you do.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yeah, that's the problem. You can not PROVE to the authorities that you found such-n-such feathers on the ground rather than by killing a protected bird or purchasing from some black market dealer. They don't give you the benefit of the doubt in that regard. I also have heard of people fined for using found songbird feathers in dreamcatchers and other stuff for sale. The wildlife laws are online and a Google search will net you all the info you could ever want.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It does NOT matter where you get the feathers...on the ground or from a caged wild bird or what ever...you cannot have the feathers. So NO story will be believed by the authoreties nor do the care.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by annie_griffin View Post
                            Josiah,
                            Thanks. I will check the laws but I have to say it seems odd that
                            anyone should care if a person picks up feathers off the ground.




                            -annie
                            many years ago i read an article in a gun magazine my brother in law had about a woman whose family vacationed at the grand canyon one year. while they were out walking the canyon trails she stopped an picked up a couple feathers. she took the feathers home,put them on a dream catcher and mailed them to hillary clinton as a gift.
                            some time later the FWS showed up at her home and trashed the place looking for the any other feathers she might have had.

                            she didnt know they were eagle, but still, someone may care.keep yourself covered

                            The older I get the less of a deterrent life without parole gets

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Actually, the feathers were seagull she had gotten at the beach and made into a Dream Catcher which she did give to the Clintons. She was arrested and fined.....later Clinton pardoned her when he left office. I have many of the articles and several court cases on file with the facts and information on this type of stuff. It is amazing what you can get arrested for....and I have seen what a house looks like after the feds are finished searching for feathers. How would you like the paneling taken off the walls, your drawers all dumped out on the ground, and doors broken into to see what was behind. They do NOT pay for damage either.

                              Comment

                              Join the online community forum celebrating Native American Culture, Pow Wows, tribes, music, art, and history.

                              Loading...

                              Trending

                              Collapse

                              There are no results that meet this criteria.

                              Sidebar Ad

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X