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Some more eye candy

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  • Some more eye candy

    Some just amazing inlay and intarsia by the master Jesse Monongya:

    Jesse Monongya Studios

    I love the way he uses the color gradient you get in orange spiny oyster. The necklace with the gaspeite beads is striking.


    Some spectacular metalwork by Edison Cummings:

    Edison Cummings @ Martha Struever Gallery

    Edison Cummings @ Hoel's

    Edison Cummings @ Garland's

    He does a huge range of techniques -- tufa casting, stamping, repoussé...


    Finally, some stunning overlay by Bennett Kagenveama:

    Bennett Kagenveama @ Garland's

  • #2
    Ribbon work in metal by Jodi Webster:

    Jodi Webster


    Jewelry by Keri Ataumbi:

    Ataumbi Metalworks

    I love the pieces she did Jamie Akuma.

    (Keri Ataumbi is Teri Greeves sister.)

    Comment


    • #3
      My purpose in listing these links was to highlight some work I considered nice and/or unusual. I guess I should have done the disclaimer thing. So I will now:

      I've never purchased from any of these websites. I know nothing about them. I'm not endorsing them. Do some research and use your judgement when considering a purchase.

      Comment


      • #4
        Some pieces by Jeff DeMent:

        Tufa casting by Jeff DeMent

        There are a bunch of videos about the process on his website.

        Comment


        • #5
          The tufa stone in the video, looks like one time casting form.

          I like the single lightning arrow earrings and the inletted lightning in the Tomahawk as the lithning pendant.
          Those who know do not write and those who write may not know. Frank W. Louis, No such Agency

          True peace between nations will only happen when there is true peace within people’s souls.
          Black Elk

          “Tell me, and I will listen.
          Show me, and I will understand.
          Involve me, and I will learn.”
          Lakota Proverb

          God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
          Courage to change the things I can,
          And wisdom to know the difference.
          Living one day at a time,
          Enjoying one moment at a time,
          Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace.
          (Reinhold Niebuhr, but the origin is debated)

          Comment


          • #6
            On rare occasions, you can get a second casting with a simple mold. Usually the details in the stone break when you unmold. Before use, the surface of the stone is coated with carbon, either from a fuel rich acetylene torch flame or fine fireplace ash. This acts as a mold release agent. The coating is rarely flawless, so you get some light sticking. Plus the thermal expansion coefficients of the stone and silver are different; this breaks fine details. I was taught to play the torch over the top of the mold during the pour. (I think because we had an undersized torch tip.) The heat can spalt the stone.

            If you're not too hard on your stone, you can grind the old design off and reuse the tufa. The stone is very soft. You grind it flat on a cement block or brick. You grind the surface a little even if it is new, because air exposure hardens the rock. It's easier to carve fresh stone surfaces -- a bit of an issue since you carve with a pen knife or Exacto knife.

            A single use mold can be a selling point. It promises the buyer an original piece. Some folks selling high end pieces, give the buyer the design side of the mold. It also helps make an emotional connection

            Comment


            • #7
              Quite a statement.


              About Me
              Those who know do not write and those who write may not know. Frank W. Louis, No such Agency

              True peace between nations will only happen when there is true peace within people’s souls.
              Black Elk

              “Tell me, and I will listen.
              Show me, and I will understand.
              Involve me, and I will learn.”
              Lakota Proverb

              God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
              Courage to change the things I can,
              And wisdom to know the difference.
              Living one day at a time,
              Enjoying one moment at a time,
              Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace.
              (Reinhold Niebuhr, but the origin is debated)

              Comment


              • #8
                Some interesting work by David Neel:

                David Neel Studio

                Comment


                • #9
                  An interesting presentation on the historic use of turquoise in jewelry

                  MIAC:Turquoise, Water, Sky exhibit

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for sharing this with us. I was searching for it for my best friend.
                    Last edited by BrunoMShull; 01-12-2022, 12:32 AM.

                    Comment

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