Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hard sole mocs tutorial

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • powwowbum49
    replied
    STEP 7

    At this point you are ready to cut the upper pattern out and then trace it on to your leather. Some prefer to always use pencil when tracing a pattern to hide but I just use pen on the back (the side that will be on the inside of the mocs) of the hide. If you needed only one pattern then be sure to remember to turn the pattern over before you trace the second upper...well unless you are that proverbial person with 2 left feet...LOL.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • powwowbum49
    replied
    STEP 6

    Now continue the tracing back to the heel area of the sole pattern. Continue on the general line/direction you were already making back to the arch line. Once you get to the back of the heel (about 1/2" behind the heel) take your ruler and measure to see if the same amount is on either side of the toe/heel line. If not choose one side and use that measurement on the other side and adjust the tracing accordingly so that the sides are even.

    You may want to write the persons name and date on the pattern. Also you might want to write which ever foot the pattern was made from...i.e., RIGHT FOOT and then write the opposite on the other side of the pattern since it will serve for both feet.

    Now some folks out there have feet that are not the same size so for those folks you will want to redo steps 1-6 for your other foot.

    Now I have to say that after I finish making my sole pattern I take a manilla folder and trace the upper pattern to that. Then I cut out the sole and also trace it to the folder. Then I cut those out of the folder and use them to make my tracings to leather with. I also keep all those pattern for possible future use.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • powwowbum49
    replied
    STEP 5

    Next start tracing out the general shape of the upper from toes back to the arch line. This will very depending on how you like your mocs to fit. For me, I like fairly snug fitting mocs so I keep the tracing line fairly tight to the sole pattern around the toes (within about 1/4" of the foward point of the toes). As you get out to the ends of the toes then start moving out to the point where the arch line ends.

    Now if you like looser fitting mocs or you plan on using insoles in your mocs, then give more room at the toe area and you might want to add about a 1/4" to each side of the arch line.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by powwowbum49; 05-22-2004, 03:18 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • powwowbum49
    replied
    STEP 4

    Next I draw 2 lines...the first is a toe/heel line. At the heel measure the distance across the widest part of the heel and put a mark there in the center of that. Then lay the ruler down from that mark to approximately where the middle toe and the toe next to the big toe meet and draw a line up that length. Then take the measurement you made of the arch and divide that in half. Place the ruler so that the half way mark is on the toe/heel line and the marks made when taking the arch measurements. Now draw a line the length of the arch measurement. (You may need adjust up or down slightly as to where the arch measurement marks were made so that you can get the arch line as close as possible to a 90 degree angle to the toe/heel line)

    You may notice a Second line now at the heel in the photo. I did this because this pattern is being made for my niece and she's 7 yrs old and growing like a weed. I extended the length of these mocs by about a 1/2 inch to give her some growing room so she won't need a new pair for a year or two.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • powwowbum49
    replied
    STEP 3

    Next use a ruler to connect the toe and heel lines on each side of the foot. Do not worry if it goes insde or outside the tracing of the foot.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • powwowbum49
    replied
    Step 2

    Next you will want to sketch the heel area and toe areas of the sole. Run a line connecting the tops of the toes and then continue it around the sides down to where the toe would meet the ball of the foot. At the heel get a good even shape to the heel area and then continue the line up about an inch or so from the heel.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by powwowbum49; 05-22-2004, 03:10 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • powwowbum49
    replied
    Okay, I have some more for this tutorial. I am going break down the steps of making a pattern and accompany each step with a photo.

    STEP 1

    The first step is to trace the foot. Be sure to do this with weight on the foot (since without weight the foot is skinnier than when weight is one it). Also before moving the foot measure the length over the arch. This measurement should be taken at about the point where a pair of low top tennis shoes laces tie at. Be sure to mark on either side of the foot tracing where you took the measurement at, since this will be important later.

    Now if you are making mocs for someone else that is sending you their tracing...be sure to let them know that it is important that they get this stuff down for you, or their mocs might not fit well after you are done...LOL!
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Well, that's the way I was taught, PWBum. But if you hide stretched and didn't contract that would be the pits. I actually made some mocs when my kids were little and cut one out 'sideways' cuz I was almost out of hide. It stretched the long ways and she had a baggy heel.

    The amount of stretch does vary in different parts of the hide. But geez, it's so expensive you really gotta use every square inch.

    I'll check for fabric moc pics. Or maybe I'll make some more. :)

    Leave a comment:


  • Yelloweyes
    replied
    powwowbum49

    Thanks for the help. See I knew I had forgotten some of what my grandmother showed me. That's what I get for not doing that many mocs for too many years. Tend to forget the little bits of info. let you know how I end up.

    Leave a comment:


  • powwowbum49
    replied
    Rose

    I never had any luck having the stretch going side to side on a pair of mocs. I did a pair for myself years ago that were cut that way and I ended up having to put an insole in them and wear socks with my mocs just to get them to fit, because the dang elk hide stretched so much. That upper gained almost 1 1/2" across the arch after it was popped right side out, and it didn't contract back much either.

    For me, that way would be just to iffy cause I like a snug fit across my arch and I can always trim excess from stretching off at the heel seam when it runs on the toe/heel line, but if it works for you...more power to ya...LOL.

    I would love to see some of those fabric upper mocs you make if you have any pics of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    Oh, and I edge the fabric or canvas upper with bias tape BEFORE beading or appliqueing the design. Sew it on with a couple rows of stitching and it's much less likely to 'blow out'. :p

    Leave a comment:


  • wyo_rose
    replied
    OK, well here's my two and a half cents about stretching. Hides do stretch more side to side than head to tail, BUT line up your mocs toe to heel line with the head to tail line of the hide. In other words you want your moc to stretch from side to side. If you think this is going to make a baggy upper, TRIM IT. This was taught to me by the elder ladies who showed me how to make mocs.

    I make a new pattern for each foot and do a 'dry fit' to see how the top fits on the sole. It's good to have a little extra on the top and 'gather' slightly around the ball of the foot and the opposite side. Some gathering at both sides of the heel is good too.

    I also fold my upper in half and mark the halfway point, and fold each side up and mark halfway to the toe on each side. I do the same with the sole and line up the marks. Most of the time I'll actually tack the top and sole together on those marks so the top doesn't shift as it gets sewed on.

    I do fabric and or canvas mocs all the time. Place the upper pattern on the bias of the fabric, cuz you need a little stretch to get your foot in. Then I use a commercial buckskin sole, sometimes doubled.

    Leave a comment:


  • hockeyfan_019
    replied
    Originally posted by ChenoaNativeGirl
    anyone have any opinion about using canvas for the uppers? it's going to be beaded of course. Also, what's this someone said about their latigo fell apart, or disentegrated or something when it got wet? Does that happen a lot? Also, you sew the upper to the sole, inside out right, then flip it right side out? And how do you make it so that your beadwork goes all the way touching the sole, like, not leaving any unbeaded area between the upper and the sole?
    Hi CNG,

    I was just thinking, perhaps you are working with a "pucker-type" upper? I've made these before too, and I attached the upper to the sole inside-out like we described, but the "vamp" across the top of the arch (the part in front of the tongue, that has the puckers along the edge) was always attached when it was right-side-out...

    As for the beading-to-edge, I think that PWB is exactly right, the last row or 2 would need to be attached after turning back right-side-out. I can't recall seeing any where the last row actually "covered" the seam, normally I see a bit of a gap above the seam before the beadwork. On mine, I normally leave a bit of gap here on purpose, since I seem to sometimes get the moc twisted on my foot a bit during "rough" usage... If there was no gap, I'd end up walking on the beadwork, and damage it. As it is, without a welt the seam takes a bit of abuse, and the thread wears.

    hth, Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • powwowbum49
    replied
    Hockeyfan

    You are ever so right in the fact that too big can be worked around but too small is a disaster!

    CNG

    I have never made mocs with canvas upper and never will, especially since hide is close to the same price as good canvas that is not on sale. I have seen one pair done on canvas and it looked very nice, but that pair still had a 1/2" strip of leather sewn to the sole and them the canvas part stitched to that. As for the latigo falling apart...I have no clue on that cause it has never happened to a single pair I have made using the stuff. Yes, I sew the mocs inside out and then pop them, but I do know some folks that just sew the toe area inside out and the they pop them and finish sewing the rest with it looking normal. And finally as for the beadwork going all the way down to the meet the sole. I can't say I can honestly remember seeing any that do, but if that is what you want to do then I would say you will need to put that last row of beadwork on after the mocs are sewn up and popped

    Leave a comment:


  • ChickasawDiva
    replied
    anyone have any opinion about using canvas for the uppers? it's going to be beaded of course. Also, what's this someone said about their latigo fell apart, or disentegrated or something when it got wet? Does that happen a lot? Also, you sew the upper to the sole, inside out right, then flip it right side out? And how do you make it so that your beadwork goes all the way touching the sole, like, not leaving any unbeaded area between the upper and the sole?

    Leave a comment:

Join the online community forum celebrating Native American Culture, Pow Wows, tribes, music, art, and history.

Related Topics

Collapse

  • Guest's Avatar
    Softeing Leather For Moccs
    by Guest
    Hello I do have a question, and I sure hope that someone will be able to help me:(

    I have some black commerical hide that I would like to use for moccs, both uppers and bottoms. The problem is my size 10 gold tip beading needles seem to break all to often:(( That is why I stoped beading...
    02-07-2003, 05:05 PM
  • Mato Winyan
    Crash course in leather selection
    by Mato Winyan
    Wonder if anyone out there would be willing to tell us about selecting the right leather for projects.... moccs...fringe...dresses..etc. and how to know how much to buy for a project. :)

    Did I say pretty please? :Angel2
    12-29-2003, 06:51 PM
  • traddancer553
    Aging Bone Hairpipes
    by traddancer553
    I have some artificial bone hairpipe I'm trying to age. I've sanded off the outer coat and have used tea but I can't seem to get it any darker. Does anyone know another way?
    11-04-2007, 07:01 PM
  • webscouter
    Knife sheath
    by webscouter
    Here are some questions for your fine folks. I was just gifted a beautiful knife, deer antler handle with eagle head carved in the end, most symetrical hand knapped blade you have ever seen.

    I am trying to make a sheath for it and am having problems with forming the rawhide inside sheath....
    10-29-2002, 12:57 AM
  • Eagle Plumes
    Beaded roach spreaders?
    by Eagle Plumes
    Hope this is in the rite spot for this question, I am head lady here real soon and I would like to make a couple of spreaders for my give-a-away I know how to bead and do all the things it takes to get the finnished product my question is does any body have any tips on how to make one of these? I have...
    04-06-2006, 10:49 AM

Trending

Collapse

There are no results that meet this criteria.

Sidebar Ad

Collapse
Working...
X