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    Okay! I was going to spend a little while writing a nifty little topic, but this is the third time I try and the computer cuts me off and I have to start over.

    So, here is the topic. My professor in Human geography used the term "amerindian". Does is anyone else think that this is a really ugly word. It's like she didn't have the time to say Native people or whatever. I was a little baffled by that one. I as thinking that she would not refer to black people as "ameriafrican" THat would sound just as dumb. Does else anyone find this a little odd?

    One more thing, as we were talking about latin american, she used the term 'mestizo'saying that is was a term for someone of american indian and european decent. She said that someone once told her that is was now used a a duragotory term and not used anymore. I have never heard of that. BUt, another thing to throw out there for you to think about.
    ~~I'm not settlin for anything less than everything~~

    www.myspace.com/billiot

  • #2
    I am in no way saying that this kind of language is not offensive or trying to make excuses for people who use these terms. Some people are resisting change and some are just uninformed. She may be focused on subject matter that she chooses to use such words as to convey the meanings to her students in order to prepair them to the exposure. These terms have not been purged from earlier historical records and mabe they shouldn't be, it does give everyone who reads these records a clear definitive view of the attitudes of early europeans.

    These terms are commonly found in college archival textbook and history books, you can view them in college libraries across the U.S. and Canada. Amerindian is common in French Canadian history and geneology especially in earlier records. The second is also correct if refering to early Mexican American history and geneology records. Metis would be the same but used in French Canada. Savage was a word use by Jesuits regularly as well as Amerindian in early marriage records in French Canada. To personalize this a little so that no one will take me out of context, I have many grandmothers through generations of my family that have been refered to as such. Without those words on records I would not be absolutely sure as to what "I" was.

    Political correctness is something that has only purged "most" books in the U.S.
    Part of me wishes that all would be changed but would that be completely wise. If the truth was completely whitewashed would it be lost in the process, I think it could be. I say let the records lie as they are.

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    • #3
      Gee, Cricket - you are my new hero!!

      I had never heard or seen those words used as such before - thank you for posting before me!! I was about to go slam off - thinking that the teacher was just being lax - hehe - now I know better - thanks for the education!!! ;)
      Everything is gonna be alright!

      Be blessed - got love???

      This b me.....

      www.myspace.com/akayo

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      • #4
        On the use of the term "mestizo"-I am fluent in Spanish and have studied the cultures of latin american as part of my courses in Spanish in college. I was taught that to tell someone in Spanish, "Soy mestiza" (I am mestiza) is nothing more than to clarify or indicate my mixed European and Native heritage. It is used as a term to denote ones race, the same as black, white, hispanic, ect. are used here in the US. I have never heard that it was a derogatory word, or an insult. I would think that if this were the case, that I would have recieved some sort of reaction from the latin american people who I have said this to.
        It has been my experience that many college level instructors are sadly lacking in true and current information pertaining to our cultures and history; it appears that this is the case in this instance as well.
        When I was in college, one of my History professors made me lecture to the class when I pointed out several times that what he was teaching was sterotypical, or just plain wrong. When the semester ended, he told me that he had learned a great deal from me, and revised the course he was teaching to include the material I had taught the class.
        If we don't open our mouths the first time we hear these things and inform people of how we as the people being referred to feel about the terms used, we will continue to hear offensive words. Raise your hand and politely object to the use of these words. It is your right to hear your ancestors referred to in a manner that does not offend you.
        Rie

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        • #5
          The school that you attend as well as other institutions of higher learning in that area are highly ignorant and incorrect in their portrayal of American Indian people. Unfortunately, I know how frustrating this can be. To take it even deeper, the amount of ignorance in Louisiana that people display about their own culture is maddening. We are the main reason and influence behind the "culture" of Louisiana, but when you learn of the cajuns and creoles, you never hear of how they were influenced and learned to adapt to the area. Furthermore, they would like to have pretended we don't exist and be done with it. This only adds to my frustration, and I'm sure you can relate. What's even worse is that there is an instructor at your school who claims to be Indian and holds sweats at his house, showboating around the whole time for the benefit of his students. It's stereotypical and sickening.
          The best you can do is be heard because if you don't make noise no one will know. I know how hard it is to sit in a class full of students that you feel like could care less as long as the instructor lets them out 5 minutes early and you feel like you're talking to people who don't care, but you never know who you might reach. One thing I find to be true though, when trying to reach people you catch more flies with honey. If you get all pissed and start accusing and showing negative attitude, they will shut you out. Take care.
          "Moral excellence comes about as a result of habit" Aristotle

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          • #6
            :D Thanks guys! I was just wondering. Yeah, I guess those terms are used in text books and so forth. I didn't really find them offensive or anything, just kinda funny. You all gave me really good opinions and view points! I love it!!! Anyway. Like jojo was saying, and I know she knows how I feel. It's hard hear in Louisiana to feel like you belong in the midst of everyone else at colleges around the state. YOU GO JOJO!!! Well, guys! Once again, thanks for all the imput. Yes, cricket I must agree, you did well to educate us all. he he he. :D :D
            ~~I'm not settlin for anything less than everything~~

            www.myspace.com/billiot

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