Optin Monster

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Backing

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Backing

    hey everyone, i was wondering what people had to offer for suggestions for backing. i just finished some cuffs and leg bands for my son. they are lazy stitch. i asked around and people told me to back it with canvas and some plastic/cardboard/stiff material in between the 2 canvas' to help keep its shape. then go around the edges with some sort of tape. can't remember the name off hand. anyway, i was hoping to get some good suggestions as to what works the best and what kind of material presents problems or what to avoid. any help would be greatly appreciated because it took me a while to finish them. thanx much.

  • #2
    When I make regalia pieces I usually bead on canvas, then use heat-n-bond to attach a soft cotton backing, then whip-stitch around the edges and then add a bead edging. I wouldn't use a plastic stiffener for cuffs, because you want them flexible enough so that they don't rub on your arms. I use plastic for stiffening barrettes, or things that REALLY need to be solid. But for those cuffs, between the beadwork itself and the heat-n-bond it should be stiff enough to hold it's shape and still be flexible enough to wear.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've made cuffs and armbands using the same method that Lightningflash does and it has worked very well. Cardboard will disintegrate eventually and will get yucky if you sweat on it or get it wet. The plastic can break if you use needlepoint plastic. If nothing else, it can chafe. Depending upon how thick the canvas is, you can double it if you need to.

      Comment


      • #4
        sounds good. . my friend told me to back it with a thicker canvas material and then a nice satin cloth to make it look good. . . he told me to sew some bias (not sure about spelling) tape around the edges. then, i want to sew the fringed bucksin to the back of the finished product. that way, i can change my son's buckskin when it starts to get old and tired. can you get the heat and bond at a fabric store and will they know about how thick the cotton will need to be? is it just a slight layer? what do you think about the process my friend told me? thanks much. I would rather do it the right way instead of go half a** and cut corners.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi,
          I just joined and if you haven't finished your cuffs yet, try interfaceing, like they use in shirt collers. There are all different weights of this material and it works great for many beaded things that you want a little stiff, but bery flexible.

          Comment


          • #6
            Just read on the beaded crown topic that fun foam could be used. Anyone else try that?
            "We see it as a desecration not only of a mountain but of our way of life. This is a genocidal issue to us. If they kill this mountain, they kill our way of life." ~Debra White Plume

            Comment


            • #7
              That is what I backed my crown with and what I am backing my daughter's crown with also. It is wonderful stuff to bead on and does'nt break down or deteriorate! I was suggesting this to another gal on here for the same thing..crowns. It makes beadign easier and faster and with great results! My crown can be seen in the gallery under women's cloth dancing.
              Don't worry that it's not good enough for anyone else to hear... just sing, sing a song.sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                I use canvas, doubled over if it is too thin. On the back of the canvas I put masking tape (easier to line up rows). after the beadwork is done I put duct(duck)tape then a material backing. the duct tape keeps the sweat from damaging the thread.
                The brighter the light, the deeper the shadow.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Leather is always good, that brown buckskin that those hobbyists use (the cheapest kind) is the best to use as backing. Since noone can see it, its put to use, and its still leather, so it'll move and breathe, as far as if you've already got loomwork off, then put canvas on the back, then put it on whatever you're using it on, for example, if you're making side drops, put it on the canvas, then sew the canvas to the leather.

                  Comment

                  Join the online community forum celebrating Native American Culture, Pow Wows, tribes, music, art, and history.

                  Loading...

                  Trending

                  Collapse

                  There are no results that meet this criteria.

                  Sidebar Ad

                  Collapse
                  Working...
                  X